The End of the Fucking World
TEotFW follows James and Alyssa, two teenagers living a seemingly typical teen experience as they face the fear of coming adulthood. Forsman tells their story through each character's perspective, jumping between points of view with each chapter. But quickly, this somewhat familiar teenage experience takes a more nihilistic turn as James's character exhibits a rapidly forming sociopathy that threatens both of their futures. He harbors violent fantasies and begins to act on them, while Alyssa remains as willfully ignorant for as long as she can, blinded by young love. Forsman's story highlights the disdain, fear and existential search that many teenagers fear, but through a road trip drama that owes as much to Badlands as The Catcher in the Rye. Forsman's inviting, Charles Schulz-influenced style lends a deadpan quality that underscores the narrative's tension. The End of the Fucking World is certain to be one of the most talked-about graphic novels of 2013. Forsman is arguably the most acclaimed talent to come out of the Center for Cartoon Studies, a school founded in 2004 by graphic novelist James Sturm and educator Michelle Ollie in White River Junction, VT. Forsman graduated in 2008 and is a two-time Ignatz Award-winner for his self-published minicomic, Snake Oil. The End of the Fucking World is his first graphic novel.

The End of the Fucking World Details

TitleThe End of the Fucking World
Author
FormatPaperback
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseAug 3rd, 2013
PublisherFantagraphics
ISBN1606996673
ISBN-139781606996676
Number of pages136 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Graphic Novels Comics, Fiction, Mystery, Crime

Write a review

The End of the Fucking World Review

  • Jan Philipzig
    July 31, 2014
    TEotFW reads like an updated, rougher version of Terrence Malick's 1974 masterpiece Badlands. While Malick's movie is narrated by a teenage girl who runs away with a charming but violent young greaser, Charles Forsman's comic book alternates the perspectives of its two young runaway protagonists. In both cases the narration is at the same time strikingly honest and fatally inept, and in both cases the female teenager turns a blind eye on the increasingly antisocial and brutal behavior of her mal TEotFW reads like an updated, rougher version of Terrence Malick's 1974 masterpiece Badlands. While Malick's movie is narrated by a teenage girl who runs away with a charming but violent young greaser, Charles Forsman's comic book alternates the perspectives of its two young runaway protagonists. In both cases the narration is at the same time strikingly honest and fatally inept, and in both cases the female teenager turns a blind eye on the increasingly antisocial and brutal behavior of her male partner. Yet the beauty and poetry Malick finds in the lives of his anti-heroes is almost completely absent from Forsman's cold and ugly world.Forsman's artwork is clearly influenced by early newspaper strips such as Gasoline Alley and Thimble Theatre, but has a cruder, grittier, more basic edge that reminds me of contemporary alternative cartoonist Jeffrey Brown. The artwork perfectly matches the protagonists' bleak lives and abrasive, unsophisticated mindsets.
    more
  • Fabian
    September 12, 2016
    Impressive gonzo violence comes in such a sweet lethal package! This gives a wicked jolt of invigorating life energy to squiggles and shapes and letters on white paper. A true pictorial achievement...!
  • Sam Quixote
    July 28, 2014
    First of all - amazing title! Second of all - AMAZING BOOK! The End of the Fucking World (or TEOTFW) is about two teenagers, James and Alyssa, who decide to run away from home together. Their journey starts out somewhat romantic then becomes increasingly more desperate and tragic until they become like the modern Bonnie and Clyde. I read Charles Forsman’s Celebrated Summer a couple months ago and loved its quietly devastating intensity in such a relatively short comic about a couple of friends w First of all - amazing title! Second of all - AMAZING BOOK! The End of the Fucking World (or TEOTFW) is about two teenagers, James and Alyssa, who decide to run away from home together. Their journey starts out somewhat romantic then becomes increasingly more desperate and tragic until they become like the modern Bonnie and Clyde. I read Charles Forsman’s Celebrated Summer a couple months ago and loved its quietly devastating intensity in such a relatively short comic about a couple of friends whose friendship dissolves over the summer and they never see each other again afterwards. But that doesn’t prepare you for how chilling TEOTFW is, which is a much, much darker read! Told in 8 page chapters (these were originally published separately as micro comics) with alternating viewpoints of our two protagonists, we see the same story from two perspectives. James, who we learn early on displays sociopathic tendencies and only gets worse as the story continues, and Alyssa, the girl who falls for him and does her best to turn a blind eye to his disturbing behaviour. The story explores the two characters’ loneliness from their remote families to their small town, and the despair they feel at their encroaching adulthood as well as their frustration and fear at their aimlessness and the unknowns of the future. James and Alyssa’s actions slowly become more foreign, at least to most of us, but Forsman reminds us of their humanity and their youth in scenes like when Alyssa meets her estranged father for the first time in 10 years - suddenly, she’s just a kid wanting to be with her dad. Other times, like the title, express the kind of heightened drama teenagers feel - what could be more fitting for a pair of desolate teenagers than to star in a book entitled The End of the Fucking World? On a surface level it could be read as a crime drama as the two start out stealing things like cars and breaking into houses to James turning to much more destructive acts. It’s a twisted love story between two people who don’t really understand what love is, having never experienced it before, but feel something - maybe the only thing they’ve ever felt - between them, and Forsman questions whether James, who is clearly a sociopath, is able to find redemption in the end.Forsman draws the book in the style of Peanuts, almost like he’s bitterly chuckling at the juxtaposition of the subject matter to the cutesiness of his characters’ appearance. It makes the one panel, where he draws James more realistically for the only time in the book, all the more powerful and shocking an image when you see those eyes. I hesitate to call a book so bleak “wonderful” but it is enormously entertaining and artistic at the same time - and, yes, that is wonderful. I rifled through this, not because it’s short, but because Forsman told a great story and told it well - he genuinely knows how to build the tension in a comic so perfectly that you’re breathlessly turning the pages by the end, wondering just how it’ll play out. And it surprises you too, in the best possible way. Both the story and the characters have stayed with me days after putting the book down - it really is an immersive and unforgettable experience. If you adore comics that tell a great story and pack real emotion in them, The End of the Fucking World is a howl of raw fury at an uncaring and empty world from a truly original creator.
    more
  • Andrew
    June 4, 2014
    There's a lot to like in this book. I guess my favourite thing about it was the pacing and the play between the text and the art. The author definitely has a good understanding of how words and drawings go together in a comicbook. I enjoyed the simple art style for the most part, but there were some panels that seemed a bit lazy - perhaps with stylistic intent, but I feel like they could have been refined.The story is about a couple lost teenagers going on a disastrous road-trip (or hometown run There's a lot to like in this book. I guess my favourite thing about it was the pacing and the play between the text and the art. The author definitely has a good understanding of how words and drawings go together in a comicbook. I enjoyed the simple art style for the most part, but there were some panels that seemed a bit lazy - perhaps with stylistic intent, but I feel like they could have been refined.The story is about a couple lost teenagers going on a disastrous road-trip (or hometown runaway). I usually read this type of story pretending that its a depiction of the teenage will, or mentality, and not literally. To the two teens, everyone is the bad guy.I'd recommend this for a nice read. I think its an excellent example of the power of this medium - even if the story didn't resonant with me.
    more
  • Pierre
    October 14, 2014
    A remarkably touching graphic novel. Simple yet very effective art.Pathos, isolation, and alienation expressed through the drawn line.Highly recommended to those who appreciate the graphic novel as art and those who never read graphic novels as an initiation to the art form.
    more
  • Kathy
    February 18, 2014
    I have finally read it, after waiting several months to finally make the purchase. I heard so much about TEOTFW and all the hype yet I really had no idea what the story was about. It surprised me. Is this a book about a sociopath and his extremely co-dependent girlfriend? Yes on the surface it certainly is. This is also allegory portraying a teenage love story. What makes a short story great (including graphic novel form) is when you are finished, you continue to think about it. Wonder about wha I have finally read it, after waiting several months to finally make the purchase. I heard so much about TEOTFW and all the hype yet I really had no idea what the story was about. It surprised me. Is this a book about a sociopath and his extremely co-dependent girlfriend? Yes on the surface it certainly is. This is also allegory portraying a teenage love story. What makes a short story great (including graphic novel form) is when you are finished, you continue to think about it. Wonder about what was really trying to be said here. Fill in some blanks, look back at it again and discover either "the" meaning or your own meaning. That is how TEOTFW was for me. On the surface it was creepy and violent and spoke very loudly about a topic nobody wants to discuss. Underneath, it is a road trip coming of age story about a couple of kids that hate their lives at home only to discover that out there in the world there is just as much if not more sickness and craziness than they were trying to escape from. Well done, simple clean illustration and short and chilly narration that speaks volumes. A little book with many layers, just like people.
    more
  • Hannah Messler
    July 26, 2013
    This book is good. It stars a yucky little jerk and his dishrag girlfriend and their unkind adventures a la if Mickey and Mallory were homely, disaffected teens. The look is super drawin-in-yr-notebook-in-math-class plain jane, keeping the brutal storyline close-to-the-bone. There's a devil worshipper who if you wondered what Lucy van Pelt might grow up to look like if she aged lonely in Utah or some shit, there you go. This sounds like a kind of pissy dismal review but it's a pissy dismal story This book is good. It stars a yucky little jerk and his dishrag girlfriend and their unkind adventures a la if Mickey and Mallory were homely, disaffected teens. The look is super drawin-in-yr-notebook-in-math-class plain jane, keeping the brutal storyline close-to-the-bone. There's a devil worshipper who if you wondered what Lucy van Pelt might grow up to look like if she aged lonely in Utah or some shit, there you go. This sounds like a kind of pissy dismal review but it's a pissy dismal story, what are you gonna do. I'd keep reading if the story kept going. I like it. It's written pretty beautifully, and the dialogue rings true.
    more
  • Kevin Cortez
    August 29, 2013
    http://drawnwords.com/review-the-end-...It’s a story that explores psychopathy. It explores teenage rebellion against authority and a need for love and understanding. The dark, simplistic style of drawing from Charles Forsman is that of Charles Schulz, injected with a syringe of inpurity. The creepy illustrations and the quickly escalated momentum of problems in The End Of The Fucking World is absolutely insane. It’s gritty and clearly conveyed as crazy. The discomforting, disturbing story is a http://drawnwords.com/review-the-end-...It’s a story that explores psychopathy. It explores teenage rebellion against authority and a need for love and understanding. The dark, simplistic style of drawing from Charles Forsman is that of Charles Schulz, injected with a syringe of inpurity. The creepy illustrations and the quickly escalated momentum of problems in The End Of The Fucking World is absolutely insane. It’s gritty and clearly conveyed as crazy. The discomforting, disturbing story is a unique comic book nothing short of fantastic.
    more
  • Michael Seidlinger
    July 28, 2013
    "Sometimes I get this feeling. A feeling of nothingness. It's not a bad feeling. It's a calm feeling. When everything is quiet. No expectations."During those moments, you can almost watch yourself fade into the bland, dark shadows of the room.
  • Stephanie
    December 21, 2013
    Should have looked closer before I started reading! Too twisted for my taste.
  • ~
    September 27, 2013
    Like every genre, YA books are becoming darker and grittier with every passing year; taboo topics are now the spine of stories and not something that they contort to skirt around. That said there is still nothing out there quite like TEotFW, nothing that can prepare you for just how twisted and gut-turning Charles Forsman's comic can be.Two doting but disturbed teenagers decide to drop-out of their safe suburban lives and go on the run 'Badlands' style, having sexual and satanic adventures along Like every genre, YA books are becoming darker and grittier with every passing year; taboo topics are now the spine of stories and not something that they contort to skirt around. That said there is still nothing out there quite like TEotFW, nothing that can prepare you for just how twisted and gut-turning Charles Forsman's comic can be.Two doting but disturbed teenagers decide to drop-out of their safe suburban lives and go on the run 'Badlands' style, having sexual and satanic adventures along the way. It should be silly, the extremes that they go to, but because of how truthfully the teens are depicted, how repeatably everyday they are, their actions become really quite shocking. I didn't like this book at all, but I wasn't supposed to. Despite it's short length and lack of driving story it's a devastating read, an unsettling one that I won't likely shake for some time.
    more
  • Ryan Werner
    July 6, 2015
    This has the feel of a movie that would get really good reviews at Sundance and they'd all use the word "stark" in one way or another. It kind of looks like Peanuts and also very much does not. The spare frames usually forgo much of a background and it works out all right in terms of paralleling the bare, minimal emotions of the characters. They both speak in simplicities, which doesn't necessarily do the story any harm, but by the end of the book it feels like the characters have simply changed This has the feel of a movie that would get really good reviews at Sundance and they'd all use the word "stark" in one way or another. It kind of looks like Peanuts and also very much does not. The spare frames usually forgo much of a background and it works out all right in terms of paralleling the bare, minimal emotions of the characters. They both speak in simplicities, which doesn't necessarily do the story any harm, but by the end of the book it feels like the characters have simply changed more than developed.When I was dealing with murder, family, and the occult as a teenager, it was the same way. TEOTFW is a good book for what little time it takes to read and a wonderful, lateral-move alternative to trying to read the funny pages from the paper after sending them through the garbage disposal along with a couple of your fingers.
    more
  • Caitlin
    July 10, 2016
    It's difficult to say that I "liked" TEOTFW. The combination of Schulz-esque artwork and the subject matter is intriguing. However, I sped through the book while waiting for a flight and couldn't believe I was done when I hit the end. After finishing it, I learned it was originally published as 8-page mini comics (presumably each pov shift). That pacing is almost utterly lost in the graphic novel. To that end, I enjoyed the comic, but the formatting issues significantly detracted from my enjoyme It's difficult to say that I "liked" TEOTFW. The combination of Schulz-esque artwork and the subject matter is intriguing. However, I sped through the book while waiting for a flight and couldn't believe I was done when I hit the end. After finishing it, I learned it was originally published as 8-page mini comics (presumably each pov shift). That pacing is almost utterly lost in the graphic novel. To that end, I enjoyed the comic, but the formatting issues significantly detracted from my enjoyment.
    more
  • Alana
    June 12, 2014
    Nothing like a little graphic novel about psychopaths to get you through your day.... actually it was kind of cool!James and Alyssa are pretty much crazy and disgusting. What's not to like? I loved the drawings, but as far as graphic novels go I really wasn't blown away by anything. More just surprised at what the characters did next. I'm sure I made some interesting faces while I read this one! Another random library pick up. Why I buy books at all when there are thousands to read for free I'll Nothing like a little graphic novel about psychopaths to get you through your day.... actually it was kind of cool!James and Alyssa are pretty much crazy and disgusting. What's not to like? I loved the drawings, but as far as graphic novels go I really wasn't blown away by anything. More just surprised at what the characters did next. I'm sure I made some interesting faces while I read this one! Another random library pick up. Why I buy books at all when there are thousands to read for free I'll never know.
    more
  • angela
    February 11, 2014
    An intriguing, brutal indie graphic novel. This is not an enjoyable read, necessarily: how could reading about sociopaths murdering people be? But it is certainly original: I appreciated the dry, crackling, Schultzian art; it called to mind the whole "mind numbing post-modern suburbia" vibe, as well as (I guess?) the emotionless vacuum of the protagonists.
    more
  • P.
    December 26, 2013
    can a sociopath be noble? TEOTFW attempts to construct a scenario where this happens. Forsman's lines and panels are spare. His characters look a little like Peanuts characters, but they are living more overtly grim lives. Irrelevant information: Forsman technically could've gone to school with one of my cousins!
    more
  • Hakim
    March 2, 2014
    Short and enjoyable, "TEOTFW" is a Badlandesque story about an anti-social teenager and his devoted girlfriend. Charles Forsman perpetuates brilliantly a tradition known to the indie comic world; creating an unconventional, riveting and compelling world full of weirdos and nuts. TEOTFW is not the most unforgettable graphic novel of all times, but there's an undeniable charm to it.
    more
  • Jeff
    March 24, 2015
    Didn't know where it was going at first. Then soon was disturbed and terrified where it did. Somewhat a little outlandish, but it landed it's stories and made it's mark in a more truthful way. Then others have tried to and succeeded. The simple stripped down artwork while looking bare. Also makes it feel all the more believable.
    more
  • Simon Sweetman
    April 18, 2016
    It's the Bonnie and Clyde/Badlands/Wild at Heart/Natural Born Killers storyline, but set in the graphic novel world and with the actual ennui and grey boredom/inertia of a reality not stylised. A great sucker-punch of a graphic novel, brutal in places, bracing.
    more
  • Emilia P
    September 1, 2014
    Dark punk-y shit man. Dark shit. A teensy bit romantic. But mostly just dark. Well composed and thought out-- it worked. Just a little bit of a Peanuts style going on here, to make things even weirder. Hooray!
  • Joe Young
    May 17, 2014
    Charles Forsman - artistA sad and affecting tale of two runaway teens, a young girl and her burgeoning-sociopath boyfriend. Strong, complicated work from Mr. Forsman.For fans of graphic novels, recommended.4/5
  • S. M. S
    August 31, 2014
    This book is perfect. Gorgeous. Haunting. Tender. Darkly funny. Heartbreaking.
  • Alison
    January 28, 2014
    For a 20 minute read, it packs a punch.
  • Nishkarsh Chugh
    January 30, 2015
    Re-read it by chance after a year in depression. Still the same greatness. Sociopaths always make good stories.
  • Andrea
    November 2, 2014
    Very simple art and not a lot of text but super fucking intense. Packs a massive wallop for such a little book. Made me shudder.
  • Shannon Appelcline
    January 14, 2014
    A well-told story with nice (minimalist) art, but too unremittingly unpleasant to be particularly enjoyable.
  • Ben Brackett
    July 19, 2013
    Meh.
  • W
    December 14, 2016
    Art style reminds me of Peanuts (a really fucked up Charlie Brown), but that's where the similarity ends.To keep the review minimalist, it's like No Country for Old Men meets Natural Born Killers.
  • Greg
    January 18, 2017
    Got a little gory for my taste but I did like the characters.
  • Dru
    April 2, 2014
    A brutal book about two broken people running off together. Stealing cars, breaking into homes, on the run from satanists, trying to figure out who they are. A tragic love story.