The Sandman, Vol. 1
In 1916, Dream is captured and encased in a glass globe in a failed attempt by a fictional Edwardian magician (very much in the vein of Aleister Crowley) named Roderick Burgess to bind Death and attain immortality. Dream bides his time for decades until Burgess dies. Afterwards, his son Alexander becomes Dream's new captor. Finally, in 1988, Alex's guards grow careless and the guards watching him fall asleep in his presence, allowing Dream to use the sand from their dream to his benefit. When the guards awake and break the seal Dream was in, he is then able to escape. Dream punishes Alex by cursing him to experience an unending series of nightmares. The rest of the story concerns Dream's quest to recover his totems of power, which were dispersed following his capture: a pouch of sand, a helm and a ruby. The pouch is being kept by a former girlfriend of John Constantine's. Once that is recovered, Dream travels to hell to regain the helm from a demon, where he incurs the wrath of Lucifer (an enmity that will have major repercussions later in the series). The ruby is in the possession of John Dee, a.k.a. Doctor Destiny, a supervillain from the Justice League of America series. He has warped and corrupted the ruby, rendering Dream unable to use it, and with it he nearly tears apart the Dreaming. However, thinking that it will kill Dream, Dee shatters the ruby, inadvertently releasing the power that Dream had stored in the ruby and restoring Dream to his full power. The collection ends with "The Sound of Her Wings", an epilogue to the first story-arc. This issue introduces a character who has become one of the series' most popular and prominent personalities: Dream's older sister Death. She is depicted as an attractive, down-to-earth young goth girl, very unlike the traditional personification of death, and spends the issue talking Dream out of his brief post-quest depression.

The Sandman, Vol. 1 Details

TitleThe Sandman, Vol. 1
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 1st, 1998
PublisherVertigo
ISBN1563892278
ISBN-139781563892271
Number of pages240 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fantasy, Fiction, Horror, Graphic Novels Comics

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The Sandman, Vol. 1 Review

  • Patrick
    January 18, 2014
    First off, let's be clear, I'm a big soppy fan of Gaiman's Work. Secondly, I've read the Sandman series several times before. So this is more a record of my fond re-reading and musing about this story rather than some sort of objective review. But if you've read any of my other reviews, that won't come as a surprise. I think it's been a full ten years since the last time I've read this series. And, given that my memory is, well... to put it plainly quite shit, I get to experience the series with First off, let's be clear, I'm a big soppy fan of Gaiman's Work. Secondly, I've read the Sandman series several times before. So this is more a record of my fond re-reading and musing about this story rather than some sort of objective review. But if you've read any of my other reviews, that won't come as a surprise. I think it's been a full ten years since the last time I've read this series. And, given that my memory is, well... to put it plainly quite shit, I get to experience the series with a fairly fresh set of eyes at this point. The first thing that I notice is that the art is different that I remember. I remember it being darker and grittier. More real AND more surreal at the same time. But that, I'm expecting, is the lens of corrective memory at play. In reality, the art seems more (for lack of a better word) cartoony. The colors are bolder, more garish than I remember. Note: I had the same experience recently when I re-read Watchmen. So I'm suspecting this is an issue with me, rather than the comic. Or perhaps I'm remembering the later parts of the comic more vividly. The other thing I'm surprised to see is that both John Constantine and a few members of the DC cannon show up in this first book. Mostly just brief walk-ons, but Martian Manhunter is there, and we see Arkham asylum and the Scarecrow. These things don't detract from the story. I can say that for a fact, because on my earlier reads when I hadn't read many comics, so I didn't know who many of those characters were. But I have to say, reading through this time they kinda surprised me. You see, I think of the Sandman series as being... well... kinda self-contained. That's not the right way of putting it really, as the story is hugely vast. It's sprawling and lovely and mythically rich. I guess what I'm saying here is that while it seems perfectly natural that Sandman exists in the same world as Odin and Puck and Eurydice, having Batman in that cosmology, even by association, feels really odd to me. And the more I think of it, it's strangely off-putting. That said, I'm fairly certain these DC cameos were early things, and weren't repeated extensively throughout the rest of the series. As for this first book, it makes for both a great story in itself, and a great start to the larger series. That's not a common thing. Is it worth your time?Absolutely. I don't care if you don't read comics, you should read this series. And if you *do* read comics, you cannot consider yourself well-read until you have Sandman under your belt. Seriously.
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  • Alejandro
    June 17, 2013
    FanTABulous preluDe! Creative Team:Writer: Neil GaimanIllustrators: Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg & Malcolm Jones IIICovers: Dave McKeanLetterer: Todd Klein A PRELUdE TO dREAM It is NEVER “only a dream”, John Constantine. Definitely there is stuff that if you read again, you’ll get it differently, but even so, you’ll get it differently if you re-read it again in a different order.I am re-reading again the first four TPBs of The Sandman since I was able to buy the rest of TPBs of the series, FanTABulous preluDe! Creative Team:Writer: Neil GaimanIllustrators: Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg & Malcolm Jones IIICovers: Dave McKeanLetterer: Todd Klein A PRELUdE TO dREAM It is NEVER “only a dream”, John Constantine. Definitely there is stuff that if you read again, you’ll get it differently, but even so, you’ll get it differently if you re-read it again in a different order.I am re-reading again the first four TPBs of The Sandman since I was able to buy the rest of TPBs of the series, BUT I chose to read first the TPBs of Death and definitely it was the right call. Neil Gaiman commented at the end of The High Cost of Living that Death can serve as an introduction to The Sandman and he was right. I guess he knows something about it since he’s the author (he,he,he).But, seriously, now that I read Death: The High Cost of Living first of re-engaging into The Sandman, I was able to recognize some characters and getting the importance of comments made there. Even wondering details like how Roderick Burguess was sure, with just a glance, that Dream wasn’t Death, but wasn’t able to know who was exactly. Allowing me to enjoy even more the re-reading experience of this first TPB in the series.Of course, re-reading again this first TPB (taking in account that I already read before the following 3 TPBs) allow me to enjoy the introduction here and there of characters that they will play relevant roles in the rest of the series. And that I was able to appreciate and understanding certain scenes.So, indeed this is a prelude to The Sandman, since Neil Gaiman is just establishing the general scenario where he will develop the story in the following TPBs. BROKEN dREAM I am riding in your dreams. 1916: Morpheus, the King of the realm of Dreams, the embodiment of Dream, is trapped by mistake by a black sorceress.Roderick Burguess didn’t want to catch Dream, he was after Death.But what’s done, it’s done.Dream is trapped in a magic circle during 72 years and even bereft from his tools of office which are key receptacles of his own power.1988: Dream is able to escape. Weak. Angry. Confused.During this first TPB of The Sandman, Morpheus must seek out for his tótems of power, a little pouch full of sand, a helm with the shape of a WWI gas mask, and a ruby.Dream needs all those three artifacts since he put inside of them too much of his own power and therefore, now without them, he won’t be able to regain control of his own realm.Dream will have a little help from John Constantine to get back one of those items, but about the remaining two, he must face alone dangerous challenges in unexpected places and/or against unexpected oponents.And since Morpheus needs those things to get back to full power, evidently he isn’t in top shape to fight his enemies with raw power, so he must rely in cunning and destiny to try to be again his “old self”.
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  • Bill Kerwin
    May 21, 2016
    I thought it was time I added The Sandman. It fits precisely into my systematic program of reading. “Hold on!” I can hear all you folks out there saying. “ Your 'systematic program of reading'? Why you're one of the most eclectic readers I know!”I can understand why you might feel that way, but there is a little method to my madness. Although it is true that some of the books I read (progressive political analyzes, slim 20th century verse collections, cat books, classic spiritual treatises, or t I thought it was time I added The Sandman. It fits precisely into my systematic program of reading. “Hold on!” I can hear all you folks out there saying. “ Your 'systematic program of reading'? Why you're one of the most eclectic readers I know!”I can understand why you might feel that way, but there is a little method to my madness. Although it is true that some of the books I read (progressive political analyzes, slim 20th century verse collections, cat books, classic spiritual treatises, or the occasional literary novel) do not fit within my grand plan, most of them do.About ten years ago, I realized that many books I liked were from emerging, belittled or despised forms or genres: the Elizabethan popular stage play, the budding 18th century novel, the gothic romance, the Victorian bourgeois novel published in serial form, the novel of sensation, the decadent experiment, the adventure tale, the sea story, the spy story, the ghost story, the pulps (both mystery and terror), the space opera and other science fiction and fantasy of the '50's, the detective novel, and the modern horror tale. Whereas the writers of “literary fiction” are often too concerned with critical opinion, judiciously curbing their personal obsessions and producing unreadable “writerly” prose, the humble genre writer is more likely to give his “inner crazy” free rein, and either tell his eccentric story in no-nonsense fashion or--on occasion--let his plots and prose burgeon untrammeled, like a blooming meadow garden. At worst, the result is amusing, or odd; at best, it is something original, something new.Not long ago, it occurred to me that—being too much a creature of words—I had neglected an obvious example of an emerging genre: the comic book of the late 80's, on its way to becoming the “graphic novel.” Since I'm already in love with Gaiman's American Gods, I decided to begin with The Sandman.I am glad I did. The first eight numbers of Gaiman's series are, on the surface, a traditional quest story. Morpheus Lord of the Dreamworld, imprisoned for years by a sorcerer, goes searching for the objects of power—his helmet, his jewel, his pouch of dream-dust—so that he may once again exercise full power over his realm. But the stories it tells, and the genres in touches, range widely, from an Edwardian tale of an Aleister Crowley type sorcerer, a pulp EC Horror Cain and Abel anecdote, a contemporary British horror story of drug abuse, through a mythic descent into hell featuring an epic duel with demons, until it climaxes in a ghastly ordeal of modern horror (with a little meta-fiction thrown in) in which an escaped madman in a diner, in possession of the Dream Lord's mind manipulating jewel, brutalizes the restaurant's clientele for hours. The final number (“The Sound of Her Wings”)—perhaps the most elegant of the eight—is however, a kind of whimsical coda, introducing us to Dream's sister, the irreverent and down-to-earth Death.I thought everything about this saga—story, dialogue, art—was well executed...except for one small detail. Gaiman chooses to make a reference to the DC universe (the Justice League of America, to be precise) in a way that breaks the spell of what otherwise would be a completely self-contained, transcendent and mythic journey. But that's the kind of thing that's bound to happen in emerging genres. People take risks.Anyway, I'm hooked. On to Sandman, Volume 2: “The Doll's House”.
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  • Bookdragon Sean
    January 3, 2015
    Mr Gaiman, thank you for the dream. See what I did there? But in all fairness this is a dream. This comic is just everything I want a comic to be. It’s dark and brutal; it’s profound and sophisticated: it’s imaginative and creative. I just love everything about it. It’s superb. Let’s begin with the characters: Dream So the protagonist is a god, a very old god. And he represents one of the key elements of life itself: hope. He is everything the mind longs for. He is the reason to carry on living Mr Gaiman, thank you for the dream. See what I did there? But in all fairness this is a dream. This comic is just everything I want a comic to be. It’s dark and brutal; it’s profound and sophisticated: it’s imaginative and creative. I just love everything about it. It’s superb. Let’s begin with the characters: Dream So the protagonist is a god, a very old god. And he represents one of the key elements of life itself: hope. He is everything the mind longs for. He is the reason to carry on living. Dream walks in the darkness. He comes from the darkness and brings the light. However, such an entity has been brought down by the folly of humans. He’s been locked away and his power sought after. The world is in turmoil; thus, the story begins. As Dream seeks the stolen relics of his power, the depth of this world is slowly revealed. Lucifer Morningstar Although Lucifer isn’t a major character in this volume, I do feel like he is being forshadowed as a later antagonist in this series. Well, at least, I hope he is. I love the rendition of Lucifer here. He is very much in the Miltonic vein. Proud and beautiful yet twisted beyond repair. One of his minions has a relic of Dream’s, and although the two are hospitable towards each other, the words speak of veiled threats and a violent past. I can’t wait to see more. Lucifer and Dream philosophising the sovereignty of hell? Give me more. Death So Death is a gothic girl who oozes with nihilism? She’s a rock chick who is clearly rather badass. She’s Dream’s sister and is rather pissed off that he didn’t call on her for help. Why are these characters so fucking cool? I could spend all day reading about this lot. Did I just find a new favourite comic series?
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  • Shelby *trains flying monkeys*
    December 16, 2014
    I need to admit something. I've never "gotten" Neil Gaiman's books. They confuse the hell out of me. I really never know where he is going with a story. *gasp* This one was some freaky ass shit. Some old guy wants to perform a ceremony to capture "Death". Yeah..okay.Anyways, he ends up capturing our guy Dream. Dream bides his time. Then he wants his domain back. Then some more freaky ass shit goes down. I see a whole lot of fangirls and boys on these books. Don't kill me yet. I have another on I need to admit something. I've never "gotten" Neil Gaiman's books. They confuse the hell out of me. I really never know where he is going with a story. *gasp* This one was some freaky ass shit. Some old guy wants to perform a ceremony to capture "Death". Yeah..okay.Anyways, he ends up capturing our guy Dream. Dream bides his time. Then he wants his domain back. Then some more freaky ass shit goes down. I see a whole lot of fangirls and boys on these books. Don't kill me yet. I have another one to read. But I'm skeered...
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  • HFK
    February 15, 2016
    Neil Gaiman is a bit of an black sheep to me. What I mean by that is that I absolutely adore his ass off. He is one of those authors that writes so beautifully, vividly, creatively that it is almost impossible not to be sucked inside the fantasy worlds he somehow manages to share to us mere mortals. All this despite of the fact that his most popular works are in general the kinds I have no interest, no passion, no need to have on my reading list.But he is Neil Gaiman. He is my black sheep. He is Neil Gaiman is a bit of an black sheep to me. What I mean by that is that I absolutely adore his ass off. He is one of those authors that writes so beautifully, vividly, creatively that it is almost impossible not to be sucked inside the fantasy worlds he somehow manages to share to us mere mortals. All this despite of the fact that his most popular works are in general the kinds I have no interest, no passion, no need to have on my reading list.But he is Neil Gaiman. He is my black sheep. He is that one anomaly, worship worthy. First volume of The Sandman did not live up to my enormous, perhaps too high and hyped up, expectations, and I in many places felt as if Gaiman did not do as good as he could do. Granted, this is a work of long process and I do know in my heart that he will eventually get to blow my mind, the more volumes I am able to read, the more I will fall in love with his creation.This was a fifty-fifty read for me. Other parts (mostly the modern parts of the story) I really liked whereas the other parts (mostly the parts that leaned heavily on the fantasy side) I did not feel at all, which again highlights my reading tastes and preferences. The Sandman as a character was build to be a very compelling, attractive, multilayered personality and he will be one of the two big reasons why I will gladly continue my journey with. The other is his gorgeous sister, The Death. I am sensing great things happening in the near future volumes.I was familiar with most of the side characters, such as John Constantine, but I do not believe it to be necessity for a reader to have that knowledge of comics world to be able to fully enjoy this volume, it is structured good enough for both sides of the fence. Sweet dreams, there will be more of those soon enough.
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  • Will M.
    May 11, 2014
    One of those graphic novels that are so famous and hyped up that it makes you want to read them. The consequence though would be that expectations tend to rocket up. I am more disappointed than entertained.I've read 2 novels of Neil Gaiman. I hated Stardust, while Ocean was a mediocre read for me. I DNF(did-not-finish) American Gods and Graveyard Book because I got bored. The Sandman was not that great for me. I think I have to conclude soon enough that I honestly don't see what's so good about One of those graphic novels that are so famous and hyped up that it makes you want to read them. The consequence though would be that expectations tend to rocket up. I am more disappointed than entertained.I've read 2 novels of Neil Gaiman. I hated Stardust, while Ocean was a mediocre read for me. I DNF(did-not-finish) American Gods and Graveyard Book because I got bored. The Sandman was not that great for me. I think I have to conclude soon enough that I honestly don't see what's so good about Gaiman. I just don't get his weird writing. I didn't hate this first volume, but it was not mind blowing. The terrible thing about this volume would be the overwhelming amount of things happening. There were too many characters (both new and recycled) so some ended up flat and boring. The main character was not bad, but like I said, he became a bit flat and boring. The only one that I really liked would be John Constantine. I hated Martian Manhunter ever since I was a child, and I still hated him after reading this.The plot was also a bit overwhelming and confusing at times. So many things were happening, and some ideas that you want the author to expound on got overlooked because new ideas were presented. The overall story was actually interesting, so I'll see if it improves in the second volume.3/5 stars. Still disappointed in Gaiman, but hopefully the second volume would be an improvement over this.
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  • Brad
    March 25, 2008
    Since joining goodreads, I’ve been baffled by the Neil Gaiman love fest. American Gods, Neverwhere, Stardust, The Graveyard Book, they appear to be universally loved, and I’ve been skeptical of this emotion that borders on worship. These books are good and all, and I recognize their general accessibility, but I don’t personally find any of them mind blowing literature. Gaiman’s prose is no match for China Mieville’s or Iain M. Banks’ or Ursula LeGuin’s (and countless others who write speculative Since joining goodreads, I’ve been baffled by the Neil Gaiman love fest. American Gods, Neverwhere, Stardust, The Graveyard Book, they appear to be universally loved, and I’ve been skeptical of this emotion that borders on worship. These books are good and all, and I recognize their general accessibility, but I don’t personally find any of them mind blowing literature. Gaiman’s prose is no match for China Mieville’s or Iain M. Banks’ or Ursula LeGuin’s (and countless others who write speculative fiction), and the way he recasts mythology into contemporary settings is more clever than inspired. The love accorded Gaiman, therefore, feels disproportionate to the quality of his work – at least to me.Lately, however, I’ve been reminded that I once loved Neil Gaiman, and that reminder was my return to The Sandman Preludes and Nocturnes. Like his other fine work, The Wolves in the Walls, The Sandman series plays to Gaiman’s greatest strength: his ability to conjure beautiful images from artists. But it also elevates many of the things that Gaiman is usually only able to do adequately. His writing, when confined by thought and dialogue bubbles, is inspired (mostly because its goal is to be natural and believable rather than aspiring to literary greatness); his contemporizing of mythology is much more palatable (happening, as it does, in a comic book universe predisposed to gods and heroes); and his naturally cinematic pacing works better in a graphic format. Yes, indeed...graphic novels are Neil Gaiman’s best form.Sleep of the Just – This may be the greatest first issue of a comic ever written. The capture of Morpheus/Dream/Sandman (or whichever name of his you prefer), the sleeping sickness, his inevitable (and beautifully patient) escape and vengeance guarantees that any fan of fantasy or comic books or fantasy and comic books must continue with the series. Even better, though, Sleep of the Just could have been its own stand-alone issue, and that would have been good enough. There are few single issues of a comic that are so fulfilling. I buy it all, and everything I had to know was given to me. Luckily, Gaiman left me with plenty beyond what I wanted to know. My personal favourite: the introduction of Sandman’s helm. Killer.Imperfect Hosts – A kick ass follow up episode that includes a taste of Sandman’s powers, the characters that populate his Dreamworld, and the beginning of his search for the three artefacts stolen when Burgess captured him instead of Death. This episode is most notable, however, for the way Gaiman weaves his Sandman into the existing universe of DC. I am not a DC fan. I read Batman and Superman because they are cultural requirements, and what I know of the DC Universe is filtered through the pages of those books, but Sandman was a rare piece that warped and wefted its way into the DC universe without letting itself get bogged down in DC’s usual shabbiness. Imperfect Hosts is where this all begins to happen.Dream A Little Dream of Me – A weakened and vulnerable Morpheus is busy looking for his sandbag, the first of the three stolen artefacts that can restore him to his former splendour and power. So he tracks down John Constantine, the Hellblazer, who bought the sandbag years before and put it into storage, but the sandbag is gone, stolen by Constantine’s ex-lover, Rachel, a heroin addict who needed money for a fix. She never got it; instead, the sandbag took control of her mind, throwing her into a forever nightmare that included the transformation of her father into a room sized, living, breathing, tortured, mass of flesh. Dream a Little Dream of Me is a horror show that hints at the depths of nightmare Dream will combat in future issues, and it embeds Morpheus more deeply into the DC Universe. It’s a satisfying chapter in Morpheus’ rebirth, and this is where the patient build towards the story’s literary quality begins. A Hope In Hell – This is the one issue that really doesn’t thrill me too much. Morpheus goes to Hell and meets up with Lucifer, Beelzebub and Azazel – Hell’s triumvirate of Dark Lords – demanding the return of his helm. He ends up dueling Choronzon for his helm in a "reality" battle. Each takes a turn in the shape or form or concept of something or other. Each incarnation is slightly tougher than the opponent’s until the victor’s incarnation can’t be beat. Morpheus defeats Choronzon as "hope," which totally sucks. Hope?! Please. I can see hope as a stage in the battle, perhaps, but as the ultimate incarnation of victory? No way. Hope can be good, but it’s also an emotion that can derail thought and action -- and that makes hope potentially bad and self-defeating. Still, Lucifer was cool and his parting words about Dream give us plenty to look forward to in the series to come: “One day, my brothers...One day I shall destroy him.”Passengers – A creepy start to the search for Morpheus’ last artefact – the Ruby of Dreams. A decrepit Doctor Destiny is sufficiently mad when he escapes Arkham Asylum, Morpheus runs into J’onn and Scott Free from the JLI, and the Doctor Destiny corrupted Ruby throws Morpheus into a catatonic stupor on the floor of a storage garage in the middle of nowhere, all setting the stage for the most terrifying chapter of Volume One:24 Hours – Bloody, nasty, marvelous. Dreams in the hand of a corrupted man become corruption, and the whole Earth suffers. This is the best issue of The Sandman in Preludes and Nocturnes, so I'll let it speak for itself. But be warned: this one is not for the faint hearted.Sound and Fury – This is a satisfying resolution to Dream’s return to power. Sandman shows John Dee mercy, he bestows the Earth with a night of pleasant dreams, and he returns to his Dreamscape to rebuild his kingdom. It’s not quite as powerful as 24 Hours, but it does what it needs to do.The Sound of Her Wings – Death is a beautiful thing. If there were no other reason to love Neil Gaiman, this realization would be enough because Death really is a beautiful thing -- both in the comic and at the end of our livesI’m glad I revisited Gaiman's greatest moment. Maybe now I can enjoy his new stuff more and appreciate him as much as so many of my friends do.
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  • Antonio
    August 23, 2014
    Esta es la primera novela gráfica de estilo occidental que leí y también es el primer comic que leí, dejando de lado a Condorito así que mi opinión tal vez no sea la más calificada en el tema, pero si te interesa, aquí va….Antes de empezar a leerlo Como la historia está dividida en siete Capítulos, mi reseña la dividiré en siete 1. El sueño de los justos Al principio estaba bastante perdido, no se explica casi nada, solo son cosas sucediendo, cosas algo tenebrosas, pero bastante confusas, lo que Esta es la primera novela gráfica de estilo occidental que leí y también es el primer comic que leí, dejando de lado a Condorito así que mi opinión tal vez no sea la más calificada en el tema, pero si te interesa, aquí va….Antes de empezar a leerlo Como la historia está dividida en siete Capítulos, mi reseña la dividiré en siete 1. El sueño de los justos Al principio estaba bastante perdido, no se explica casi nada, solo son cosas sucediendo, cosas algo tenebrosas, pero bastante confusas, lo que más llama mi atención en esta parte es el arte de los dibujos y la explosión de colores.2. Anfitriones imperfectos sigo algo perdido, aunque mi entusiasmo no ha disminuido, empiezan a aparecer otros personajes como los sirvientes del Señor del sueño y Las Parcas, con ellas finalmente veo un camino y un propósito en la historia. 3. Sueña conmigo sorpresa, aparecen personajes famosos de DC nada menos que John Constantine con su ayuda el Señor del sueño empieza a cumplir su propósito. Este capítulo cuenta una historia bastante tenebrosa y empiezo a entender porque es una novela gráfica adulta 4. Una esperanza en el infierno -ESTOY EN EL INFIERNO Y ME ENCANTA hola Lucifer n_n- El señor de los sueños continua en su búsqueda y se encuentre en el infierno, ahora gobernado por un triunvirato, el deberá enfrentarse al demonio Choronzon este duelo es lo más genial y épico hasta ahora y como Sandman obtiene su victoria es espectacular. Pero aún no termina y aunque Sandman sale triunfante del infierno se ha ganado unos enemigos peligrosos. 5. Pasajeros Este capítulo es corto y aunque salen más superhéroes y villanos famosos de DC pensé que me estaban metiendo relleno… hasta el final del capítulo donde Gaiman me da un ¡Ja Ja te engañe! y me doy cuenta que Sandman no las tiene tan fáciles 6. 24 horas si antes dude si esto debería considerarse una novela gráfica adulta acá me doy cuenta que definitivamente lo es, esto paso de tenebroso a terrorífico en un momento... John Dee (que viene a ser el principal adversario de Sandman en el comic) es todo un psicópata con títulos y certificados estoy bastante seguro que el maldito desgraciado se graduó con honores en la universidad de los dementes, en unas pocas páginas Gaiman una vez más me demuestra su grandeza y lo retorcido que puede llegar a ser. Ya solo falta el final 7. Ruido y furia el final, Sandman y el psicótico John Dee tienen su batalla decisiva en el mundo de los sueños -modo surrealismo on- y están bastante parejos, pero solo puede haber un vencedor…(view spoiler)[La manera como Sandman se convierte en el vencedor no es como yo me lo imaginaba, ni tampoco me imagine la compasión hacia John Dee, quizás esta no sea su ultimo encuentro (hide spoiler)]Con esto se cierra el primer volumen de Sandman, me he llevado una grata experiencia con este comic, El señor del sueño y su peculiar familia tienen un aire mitológico que me encanta, y los siguientes volúmenes siempre tienen algo que te atrapa, si eres de los que les gusta el genero fantástico, seguramente te gustara.
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  • Kirstine
    May 22, 2012
    "I am anti-life, the beast of judgement. I am the dark at the end of everything. The end of universes, Gods, worlds... of everything. And what will you be then, Dreamlord?""I am hope."This is my favourite quote from this book, and one of my favourite quotes in general. It's beautiful. And true, thank god, so true. I really liked this book. I've wanted to read The Sandman for a long time, and after this I'm beginning to grasp why it's become so popular. I really, really hope I can find the rest o "I am anti-life, the beast of judgement. I am the dark at the end of everything. The end of universes, Gods, worlds... of everything. And what will you be then, Dreamlord?""I am hope."This is my favourite quote from this book, and one of my favourite quotes in general. It's beautiful. And true, thank god, so true. I really liked this book. I've wanted to read The Sandman for a long time, and after this I'm beginning to grasp why it's become so popular. I really, really hope I can find the rest of these novels at my local library.You can tell that this is a prelude to the "actual" series, and that means the plot is a bit too straightforward. I can forgive that, because it's supposed to introduce us to the different characters and it does a brilliant job of it, but where I was left in awe of the characters and the supernatural universe, I had a slight "meh" feeling about the plot. Still, I'm perhaps a little bit in love with Morpheus (and maybe also his sister, Death). For some reason he reminded me of Neil Gaiman looks-wise. Death is fabulous too, of course, but Morpheus managed to steal his way into my heart in a way his sparkling, goth sister didn't (yet anyway). I'll definitely continue with this series, even if it means I have to buy it! It's creative, the art is to die for, and it manages to be both dark and hopeful at the same time (the quote above is an excellent example of this) something I think is probably a Neil Gaiman trait. It even managed to make me feel almost comfortable with the thought of dying, something that usually terrifies me. That is great story-telling.They also get props for including Lucifer AND Beelzebub AND Azazel. Very cool. So yes, this is definitely recommended!
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  • Hershey
    August 29, 2014
    Once I was all done with this book, my very first thought was "This book is really weird."Neil Gaiman, as all of you know, is a God at creating the most intricate and best of all story worlds. Honestly, every time I pick up his books, I never have a single clue with where he's going to take the readers with his story lines. Reading the blurb seriously does not help. Gaiman's works always have depth and much more stuff going on than what the blurb normally says.So, I finally have gotten around to Once I was all done with this book, my very first thought was "This book is really weird."Neil Gaiman, as all of you know, is a God at creating the most intricate and best of all story worlds. Honestly, every time I pick up his books, I never have a single clue with where he's going to take the readers with his story lines. Reading the blurb seriously does not help. Gaiman's works always have depth and much more stuff going on than what the blurb normally says.So, I finally have gotten around to picking up one of his most hyped books or it sounds better when put this way, one of the most hyped graphic novels of all time, The Sandman. Of course, when I opened the book I immediately wanted to love this book like I always think whenever I start reading an extremely hyped book. Plus, it's by Neil Gaiman and I loved the two books of his I read recently so yes, I was very much prepared to love this book.Everything went on really great considering half the time I was trying the figure out what the hell was going on. With the dream sequences intervening the story line, it was kind of hard to follow but ehh I managed quite well, I guess. Except for the last bit. If not for that, this would have gotten a solid 5 star rating. But we'll come to that a bit later.I feel like that going into this graphic novel without knowing much would provide the best reading experience but I will give you the gist of the story line. Feel free to skip the next paragraph if you're interested in going into the graphic novel without knowing much about it. So, there are these people who decide to summon Death and cure the disease of dying. But alas, their summoning does not bring Death but another kind of Endless. Their summoning brought the King of Dreams, The Sandman. They ask him for wishes but he never talks to them. Many, many years pass and finally the Sandman makes his escape from the glass prison his human captors have created for him. He had three tools into which he put most of his magic and now they're missing, stolen by his human captors and passed onto others. The first volume, Preludes and Nocturnes is about Sandman recovering his most prized tools. At times, there was a lot happening in the graphic novel and it was really hard to follow because after Sandman's capture and his tools going missing, people don't have proper dreams. They have weird dreams, like how dreams are always like and these dream sequences keep interrupting the story line and many at times, it threw me off balance with what was actually happening. It was a slight inconvenience but it did not annoy me or made me want to rip this book. I just wish I understood it better but people say it gets easier to understand as you keep on reading the volumes. I guess you just get used to it. After all, this is a story about the King of Dreams and dreams generally don't make any sense.Also, I'm really addicted to how the King of Dreams looks like in Gaiman's graphic novels. The Sandman looks a bit like him, don't you think? I really, really, dig this look. I love this version of Sandman! He's so sexy! :DComing back to the story line, you also get to see certain DC characters and it was really cool how Gaiman incorporated those characters into this graphic novel. There was a lot going on in this first volume and the last bit was hella confusing but hey I know dreams are fucking incomprehensible and I decided to go with it. Maybe,after reading the sequels and years later when I pick this amazing book again, I'll be like, "Yep. I get it!".Let's not forget the artwork! The artwork for this book was very dark and gritty. The colors were stark and never soft and at times, a lot of stuff happens in one page which might make it quite hard to follow. Sometimes, you wanna stare at the plethora of characters in a single page and other times you just want to get on with it. The illustrations weren't swoon-worthy and they weren't bad either. It was good. I guess more importance was given to the Sandman and his story lines which I was completely fine with.I know my review makes me sound like I'm torn between liking and disliking this book, but to be honest, I really did enjoy this book a lot. It had so many characters (some very familiar), so many ideas, so much depth and on the whole, I had a lot of fun reading it even when it was confusing as hell. It didn't even bother me much. Just don't ask to me explain every single thing, okay? :DSample:
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  • Sh3lly ✨ Bring on the Weird ✨
    September 8, 2014
    Decided to re-read this since my library had it. I haven't read this since the 90s. I don't remember anything about it so far. It's kind of like all brand new and sparkly. And creepy. Yes, definitely creepy, in a good way.And now here's a random Bowie gif that reminded me of this for some reason:I'm keeping my original rating. This was fantastic. I like how he worked a few superheroes into it and (view spoiler)[his goth sister ended up being Death. (hide spoiler)] This is adult comics at its bes Decided to re-read this since my library had it. I haven't read this since the 90s. I don't remember anything about it so far. It's kind of like all brand new and sparkly. And creepy. Yes, definitely creepy, in a good way.And now here's a random Bowie gif that reminded me of this for some reason:I'm keeping my original rating. This was fantastic. I like how he worked a few superheroes into it and (view spoiler)[his goth sister ended up being Death. (hide spoiler)] This is adult comics at its best, for sure. So far, I much prefer Gaiman's Sandman to any of his full-length books.
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  • Brooke
    July 10, 2009
    In the foreword and the afterword, both the editor and Gaiman indicated that this isn't the strongest volume in the Sandman series; Gaiman was still finding his vision for the series, it's essentially a fetch quest, etc. I'm inclined to agree with them, although it was still enjoyable (as any video game fan will tell you, a fetch quest can still be fun, but it's not the strongest narrative device). I'm halfway through Volume 2: The Doll's House and I'm already finding the story much more interes In the foreword and the afterword, both the editor and Gaiman indicated that this isn't the strongest volume in the Sandman series; Gaiman was still finding his vision for the series, it's essentially a fetch quest, etc. I'm inclined to agree with them, although it was still enjoyable (as any video game fan will tell you, a fetch quest can still be fun, but it's not the strongest narrative device). I'm halfway through Volume 2: The Doll's House and I'm already finding the story much more interesting. Preludes and Nocturnes is a good introduction, but not much more than that.
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  • Terry
    October 31, 2013
    3 – 3.5 starsOk, so, The Sandman. Ground breaking comic series from the early days of DC’s innovative Vertigo line. One of the many comics of the era that was trying to do new (or at least different) things with the medium and even went so far as to not only NOT be primarily a superhero book, but one that had elements that hearkened back to the old days of anthology comics in addition to telling the serialized life story of the ‘hero’. I know I’m in the minority here, and I will admit that my op 3 – 3.5 starsOk, so, The Sandman. Ground breaking comic series from the early days of DC’s innovative Vertigo line. One of the many comics of the era that was trying to do new (or at least different) things with the medium and even went so far as to not only NOT be primarily a superhero book, but one that had elements that hearkened back to the old days of anthology comics in addition to telling the serialized life story of the ‘hero’. I know I’m in the minority here, and I will admit that my opinion is based on one bad experience and a subsequent lack of desire to make further attempts, but to me The Sandman series of comics represents the apex of Neil Gaiman’s writing. As far as I can see it was in The Sandman that Gaiman not only made his name in the industry (a name that would ultimately pave his way out of comics and into not only the world of prose, but also as something of a genre celebrity), but it’s also where he developed the style, preoccupations, and motifs that would come to characterize, in one form or another, all of his later works. “Preludes and Nocturnes” is the first storyline of the comic, taking up the first eight issues of the monthly run. In it we have Gaiman starting with the name of a golden age superhero and creating a new character based on its mythological antecedents. Taking a cue from Zelazny’s Amber chronicles Gaiman then built up a backstory for Morpheus, the godlike king of dreams, and made him part of a fractious and dysfunctional family known as ‘the Endless’…though most of that is (with one major exception) only alluded to in hints and asides in the first story arc and will be developed more fully later in the series, ultimately becoming the lynchpin of the tale of this version of the Sandman. What Gaiman does centre on in this arc are the horror anthology roots of his story as well as the set-up for Morpheus’ quest to regain his lost place and powers. It appears that some naughty occultists of the early 20th century (think Aleister Crowley and his Golden Dawn cronies) want to capture Death and rule the world. Instead they end up trapping her younger brother Dream, with disastrous results for many people who are no longer able to sleep, dream, or hope. Unable to extort power or promises from their silent victim they instead steal from him the artifacts he carried and leave him imprisoned both physically and spiritually on the mortal plane. Of course, things can’t remain thus and through the passage of time and loosening of vigilance Morpheus is finally able to escape and wreak vengeance on the mortals that dared imprison him. The next step is a standard quest narrative as the Sandman, weakened by years of imprisonment and the loss of his artifacts (into which he had poured much of his being and power…shades of Tolkien there), travels from the mortal plane to the realm of hell in an attempt to regain his tools and place in the cosmos. Standing in his way are both the triumvirate that rules hell and its legions of demons and the demented mind of a minor supervillain whose tinkering with the vast powers of Dream could end not only one of the Endless, but the world as we know it. We also get a coda to Morpheus’ quest in which we meet his older sister Death (an ironically upbeat reaper and perennial fan-favourite for the duration of the series who spawned a few spin-offs of her own) and get a glimpse into the role this strange family plays in the cosmos.I like what Gaiman has done here, inserting many easter eggs and call outs to various elements of the DC universe (and the more esoteric aspects of our own), but still bringing to it his own point of view and building upon it his own mythology. Whether it’s a sly call-out to the origins of Morpheus’ golden age hero namesake, a visit to the JLI embassy to intrude upon the lives and dreams of two of its members, or the insertion of a pair of characters from an old horror anthology comic as members of Morpheus' retinue in the now shattered land of dreams, Gaiman has done his homework and incorporated it into some admirable worldbuilding. I definitely noticed that this first arc of The Sandman was fairly heavy in its use of horror elements with many gruesome deaths and a lot of macabre imagery (as opposed to the strong fantasy flavour that came to dominate the later story arcs). Knowing where the story is heading also made this read an interesting one, as references to characters and events that will come to loom large in the story of Morpheus are things that I certainly missed my first time around, though they now give an added depth and reality to what Gaiman has penned. Why only 3 - 3.5 stars? Probably because the more gruesome aspects of the story didn’t appeal to me as much and I know things are going to get even better. This was a good start, but Morpheus has a long, and interesting, road ahead of him. Also, even this early it’s obvious that Morpheus is a bit of a prig so I don’t always sympathize with him as the protagonist. He’s ultimately much more interesting as a vehicle for the stories of others than as the ‘hero’ of his own. Of course, given his role in the multiverse that is altogether appropriate.
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  • Carol
    October 22, 2016
    Ok, this is cool. (do people still say cool?) Preludes & Nocturnes is the first of twelve in THE SANDMAN series that I have put off reading far too long.....It begins June 6, 1916 in Wych Cross, England.....In an attempt to capture and bind DEATH to achieve immortality, the creepy looking and evil Daemon King, Roderick Burgess mistakenly apprehends her brother DREAM instead.....DREAM (Morpheus) is robbed of his powers, but will not talk....."Confined in a glass box for three score years and Ok, this is cool. (do people still say cool?) Preludes & Nocturnes is the first of twelve in THE SANDMAN series that I have put off reading far too long.....It begins June 6, 1916 in Wych Cross, England.....In an attempt to capture and bind DEATH to achieve immortality, the creepy looking and evil Daemon King, Roderick Burgess mistakenly apprehends her brother DREAM instead.....DREAM (Morpheus) is robbed of his powers, but will not talk....."Confined in a glass box for three score years and ten. A human LIFETIME. TIME moves no FASTER for my kind than it does for humanity, and in PRISON it CRAWLED at a snail's pace...I was...I am...the LORD of this REALM of DREAM and NIGHTMARE."The adventure really picks up speed after DREAM is finally freed and begins to search for his stolen tools to regain his super powers, but it wasn't until I read the last two chapters, "Sound and Fury" and "The Sound of her Wings" with DREAM'S sister's appearance that I was convinced I must continue on with the entire series. Goth Girl DEATH is so cool....and oh how she captures Franklin!Creepy tricks and treats throughout with wonderful illustrations and Neil Gaiman for an author equals a great read!
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  • Kayıp Rıhtım
    November 1, 2016
    Onu hepimiz tanıyoruz. Kumlarını insanların gözlerine serpiştiren bir uyku tanrısı o. Yunan mitolojisinde Morpheus, Afrika’da Kai’ckul… Kardeşleri olan Sonsuzlar arasında ise Rüya onun adı. Pek çok şarkı ve mitteyse Sandman…Sandman, Neil Gaiman’ın magnum opusu olduğu kadar, DC’nin bugün efsaneleşmiş pek çok eserini bastığı Vertigo markasının kuruluşunda da bir kırılma noktası. Evet evet, hepiniz biliyorsunuz ki o bir efsane. Belki de bunu duymaktan bıktınız. Ama emin olun, bunun için geçerli ned Onu hepimiz tanıyoruz. Kumlarını insanların gözlerine serpiştiren bir uyku tanrısı o. Yunan mitolojisinde Morpheus, Afrika’da Kai’ckul… Kardeşleri olan Sonsuzlar arasında ise Rüya onun adı. Pek çok şarkı ve mitteyse Sandman…Sandman, Neil Gaiman’ın magnum opusu olduğu kadar, DC’nin bugün efsaneleşmiş pek çok eserini bastığı Vertigo markasının kuruluşunda da bir kırılma noktası. Evet evet, hepiniz biliyorsunuz ki o bir efsane. Belki de bunu duymaktan bıktınız. Ama emin olun, bunun için geçerli nedenleri var. Nasıl mı? Sandman, başlı başına bir edebi hazine aynı zamanda. Shakespeare esinli replikleri ve sayısız göndermesiyle edebi olduğu kadar, ebedi de… Tıpkı kendisinin de Sonsuz oluşu gibi.Her şey insanın açgözlülüğü ve hırsıyla başlıyor; tıpkı diğer pek çok hikâyede olduğu gibi. Hatta pek çok kutsal kitapta da olduğu gibi, değil mi? Ölümsüzlüğü arayan bir adamın, Ölüm’ü tuzağa düşürmek için kurduğu tarikatıyla yapılan açılış, Cthulhu mitosuna da bir selam çakıyor sanki. Ama ölümsüzlüğü arayan insanlara biz bilinen ilk yazılı eserden beri aşinayız. M.Ö. 2000’lere, yani Gılgamış’a kadar dayanıyor bu tutku. I. Dünya Savaşı zamanında neden sürüyor olmasın ki? Sürüyor… sürüyor…Bu okült tarikatın Lovecraft benzeri dokunun altında işler planlandığı gibi gitmiyor ama. Sonsuzlar arasında gotik giyimi ve eğlenceli kişiliğiyle daha sonra tanıyacağımız (ya da sizin çokan tanıdığınız) Ölüm yerine, tuzağa kardeşi düşüyor: Rüya. Böylece 70 yıllık bir esaret, bu sırada tarikatta değişen güç dengeleri ve bu süreçte sayısız kişinin uyanmamacasına daldığı yıllar süren uykular başgösteriyor.Morpheus, ne zaman ki kabuğunu kırıp hapishanesinden kaçıyor, işte o zaman başlıyor ona ait olanları geri almaya. Cthulhu’nun yüzünü andıran, ama yalnızca yüzünden tek bir dokunaç sarkan, dalgıç kaskı benzeri bir miğfer bunlardan ilki. O meşhur, gözlere serptiği kum dolu kesesi ikincisi. Üçüncüsüyse hikâyede hayati bir öneme sahip. O da şu: güçlerinin büyük bir kısmını depoladığı kırmızı bir yakut.Yolculuk boyunca DC’nin pek çok süper kahramanına dokunacak, onlarla karşı karşıya gelecek ya da imgeler olarak aklımızda canlandıracağız. Bu, sadece kayıp eşyaların aranışı değil; bu aynı zamanda DC evreniyle mitolojinin bir harmanı. Çünkü kimi mitolojik karakterler de (Nors cadıları Norns gibi) kurguda kendine yer buluyor.Evet, en dıştaki çatı bu şekilde. Ama sanmayın ki her şey bu kadar basit. Çünkü bu başlangıcın her kelimesinde, her adımında, her durağında bambaşka bir mucize yatıyor. Tıpkı bir müzikal gibi. Bu cildin adı boşuna Prelüdler ve Noktürnler değil. O bir prelüd; çünkü bu müzikalin en başı, ilk cildi. O bir noktürn; çünkü kendi içinde gerçekten duygusal ve bir o kadar özgür, dizginlenemeyen, müthiş bir esin kaynağıyla fışkırmış bir yapıda.Neil Gaiman bize Sandman’i sunarken peşi sıra bir o kadar da birikim getirmiş. Çünkü Sandman’in bu ilk cildinde Homeros’un Odysseia’sından İncil’e; John Milton’ın Kayıp Cenneti’nden Shakespeare’in Julius Caeser ve Macbeth oyunlarına; Dante’nin Cehennem’inden (Inferno) Mary Poppins’e kadar uzun bir yol var.Gaiman, tüm bunları Rüya’nın kâbuslar ve düşlerle bezeli cildine öyle bir işlemiş ki, biz okurlar onun büyülü gerçekliğinde âdeta uykuya dalıyor ve düş aleminin bir parçası oluyoruz.Biliyoruz ki Sandman’in yolculuğu burada kalmayacak. Sonsuzlar’ın hikâyelerinde gidilecek daha çok yer, keşfedilecek daha çok diyar var. Ama o zaman gelene kadar, şimdi gözlerimize pıtır pıtır dökülen kumlara teslim olup, bu cildin derinliklerinde uykuya dalma vakti.Hayal gücünün ve edebiyatın sonsuzluğuna, Sonsuzlar’ın varlığına inanan herkese benden tavsiye olunur.- Hazal ÇAMURBaskı kalitesinden çeviri karşılaştırmasına, eserin tüm edebi göndermelerini ele aldığımız detaylı incelememizin tamamı için: http://kayiprihtim.com/inceleme/sandm...
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  • Brad
    March 25, 2013
    I have to say I enjoyed this much better the second time around. Both times I really got a kick out of the Crowley sidestory, and I still have no idea who or what the original sandman comic was all about, nor do I particularly care, but this reimagining is a real work of art.It's not even the art, per-se, although I did enjoy seeing Bowie as Satan. It fits him so well. It was the story. It seemed to stumble about for a short while as 70 years of imprisonment turned a very old god into a shadow, I have to say I enjoyed this much better the second time around. Both times I really got a kick out of the Crowley sidestory, and I still have no idea who or what the original sandman comic was all about, nor do I particularly care, but this reimagining is a real work of art.It's not even the art, per-se, although I did enjoy seeing Bowie as Satan. It fits him so well. It was the story. It seemed to stumble about for a short while as 70 years of imprisonment turned a very old god into a shadow, but once he was released, we had the real power of myth awaken and we suddenly had a Quest to Regain Powerful Artifacts, including John Constantine representing normal human worlds, Satan representing hell, and Doctor Dee representing dreams all made perfectly real. Each success returned Dream to his former glory and established a truly epic worldbuilding experience.If everything is possible, then what is necessary?The answer? A good night's sleep. Possibly.Oh hell, I know what's going to happen later. This has made me almost impossibly giddy to revisit it. Welcome home, Dream.
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  • Anne
    May 28, 2009
    I liked the beginning, when Dream was captured. The mystical elements held my attention. However, the middle of it kind of grossed me out. Especially the part in with Dee in the diner. EWWWW. The end of Preludes and Nocturnes totally made up for it, though. I loved Death! How cool is she?! Whoever came up with the idea to make Death a peppy little goth girl was a genius!
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  • Anuradha
    January 7, 2017
    POPSugar Reading Challenge: #39. The first book in a series I haven't read before The air is musty, tired, old, it smells of lost dreams and rotten fabric. I would have to sell my kidney and part of my liver to acquire this. Fortunately, I have a friend who has a copy, so my organs are safe. Now, whether or not he sold his organs to buy this is unknown to me, but I am glad he has the book. Now, I am no longer a Gaiman virgin; I've read a fair few of his riveting stories. And yet, his knowledge, POPSugar Reading Challenge: #39. The first book in a series I haven't read before The air is musty, tired, old, it smells of lost dreams and rotten fabric. I would have to sell my kidney and part of my liver to acquire this. Fortunately, I have a friend who has a copy, so my organs are safe. Now, whether or not he sold his organs to buy this is unknown to me, but I am glad he has the book. Now, I am no longer a Gaiman virgin; I've read a fair few of his riveting stories. And yet, his knowledge, and also the way he uses his knowledge of mythology and combines it with humour and fantasy never ceases to baffle me. Also, because I haven't per se reviewed a comic or a graphic novel before, I must take this opportunity to admit that it's a lot harder than reviewing a novel or any other book with just words, mostly because there's so much more going on! I've read comic books for a long time now, and though I see myself as more of a Marvel girl, I found myself rubbing my hands in glee each time I saw a familiar name. I love pop culture references, subtle double entendres, and this book, much like every book by Gaiman is chock-full of them. Mortals, belonging to the Order of Ancient Mysteries, more specifically, Roderick Burgess, Lord Magus of the Order, accidentally captures Dream, in his attempt to capture his older sister Death and become all-powerful. Wych Cross, England. Roderick Burgess's waking dreams are full of the power and the glory. And of Death, of course. Especially Death. "They will no longer make jokes Alex. When Death is at my command." Of course, as is the result of such fundamentally system-altering act, things begin to get really weird. Of course, because it's Neil Gaiman writing for DC, it becomes weirder than weird. People fell asleep and did not wake up... They lived their lives like sleepwalkers; eating if fed, sometimes talking nonsense, dream stuff... People like Unity Kinkaid for whom the Sands of Time stopped flowing sometime half a century earlier lived like this for seventy long years. Not dead, but not really alive either. The Universe did try to compensate, the Universe knows someone is missing and slowly it attempts to replace him , what with Wesley Dodds, who sleeps the Sleep of the Just. With the death of Roderick Burgess 1863-1947 Not Dead, only Sleeping , his son Alex comes to power as the...master (?) of Dream, until, as luck would have it, Dream escapes. What are mortals to the Endless, after all? "Confined in a glass box for three score years and ten. A human lifetime. Time moves no faster for my kind than it does for humanity, and in prison it crawled at a snail's pace... I was...I am...the Lord of this realm of Dream and Nightmare." After punishing Alex as he very well should, "It was more tiring than I had expected. But he will never return to the life he knew. His is the nightmare everlasting...Eternal waking" , and chastising humans for being utter eejits, "What? You wanted Death? Then consider yourself lucky for the sake of your species and your petty planet that you did not succeed...that instead you snared Death's younger brother..." our hero tries to get his life (and by extension, that of humanity) back in order. Dream breaks the fourth wall, so to speak, and his inner monologue is dignified, noble even, at the same time, very dry and humourless. "I have always been solitary, but here on the nightward shores of dream, loneliness washes over me in waves, lapping and pulling at my spirit." His thoughts are mostly deep and profound, "Beyond, outside my dreamworld there is infinite dust, infinite dark. And the dreamworld is infinite, although it is bounded on every side" and if I'd known him personally, I'd probably not have been too fond of him. He was, in simple words, boring. "The dreams that pass through the Gates of Ivory are lies, figments, and deceptions. The other admits the Truth. No one guards the horned gate anymore. I remember the Way of the Old." Wise? Yes. You threatened, cajoled and pleaded for gifts that are neither mankind's to receive, nor mine to give. You had no thought to the harm you must have brought to your world... Lord, what fools these mortals be." "I find myself wondering about humanity. Their attitude to my sister's gift is so strange. Why do they fear the sunless lands? It is as natural to die as it is to be born. But they fear her, dread her. Feebly they attempt to placate her. They do not love her. ... My sister has a function to perform, even as I do. The Endless have their responsibilities. I have responsibilities. "It is never "only a dream", John Constantine. Here less than some other places... All is real. Nothing is real. And of course, my personal favourite. First food. Then clothing Because always, always, food wins the battle. As it should.Kindly? Yes. "Through your dreams, my sleeping children, you had a passenger, and you never knew." But boring? Also, yes. I left a monarch, yet I return naked, alone, hungry. "I sift it (sand) through my fingers. Feel each grain of it. Inexhaustible. Endless. Like myself, like the few others of my kind. Endless." Nevertheless, I found myself chuckling as he chalked out his, er, plan, to get his belongings back. Because, of course, who else was involved but the Justice League of America. "There are things I do not know about this 'Justice League'. More than mere humans, eh...? The Englishman, then, John Constantine. He has the pouch--or he knows where it is. And he is just a man. ... He is, after all, just a human. Just one human. What could possibly go wrong?" Neil Gaiman seamlessly transitions between the inner monologues of his many...narrators, and the end result is beautiful. Take Constantine, for instance. "These things with faces like appendectomy scars were crocheting my intestines into body bags for the blind and dead. I told myself it was only a dream, but it did not matter. The bastards just kept on bloody knitting." He says of a nightmare. For something that is supposed to give me nightmares, I found myself grinning instead. I nearly peed myself when he makes a Swamp Thing reference. "I ought to introduce you to the big green bloke.You'd like him. He hasn't got a sense of humour either." Of course, because of my familiarity with John Constantine, and also because he's tons more fun than Dream, I had more fun where Constantine was the narrator. His inner monologue was human, sometimes redundant, yet completely relevant. "One thing I've learned - you can know anything. It's all there. You just have to find it. 'S weird: Smells are a hotline to memory. "Uh, we'll stick together, won't we?" , he says at one point, because he thinks he's in a real life horror movie, and I find myself thinking "ya know, that's exactly what I would say."He sasses Dream more than once, and because of Dream's stoic demeanour, it's hilarious. "Anyway, I was fond of Rachel once. She was, you know, the girl of my dreams. For a while. "So. Where are you going now?" "To Hell..." "Hehhh. Aren't we all, mate? Aren't we all? And of course, I should probably end with a bit of Constantine wisdom, because we all need it. You don't call him (Dream). His kind just turn up out of the blue. They call you. Dream, in his Dreamland is assisted by many, including the proverbial (should I say Biblical?) Cain and Abel. "I'm Abel my Lord. From the first, hmm, story. The, er, victim." "That's me, yer Worship. Purveyor of Penny Dreadfuls, Shilling shockers, blood and thunders and Fust-rate nightmares." In the nature of Shakespearean jesters, Cain and Abel provide some much needed comic relief. You...Button Burster! You low-down, spying, peeking, prying, butterfingered-" , until of course, everything turns dark again. Even the pain feels better than the cold of death. Hell is Hell, as it should be, We travel to the summit past vasty halls that echo of screams and grunts and sighs and dust. Up the stairs that run with sweet blood , but with his classic wisdom, Dream bests everyone. "What power would Hell have if those here imprisoned were not able to dream of heaven?" There are many ways to lose the oldest game. Failure of nerve, hesitation... Being unable to shift into a defensive shape. Lack of imagination. My favourite part, of course is with Dr. Destiny. "Dee is for lots of things. Death. Dust. Darkness. Demons." Confined to Arkham Asylum (there's a cameo appearance by the Scarecrow, ""It is a comfort in wretchedness to have companions in woe." Marlowe. Faust. Of course, he was talking about Hell. But it applies equally to Arkham. Heheh" by the way, and it is splendid) after his dirty deeds, Johnny Dee escapes, with a little help from his mother. In all his incredible insane glory, Dr. Destiny is a delight to read about. "What are you waiting for?" "Oh, you know. The usual. The end of the world." There is something about these classic villains that make them so...lovable. Of course, the materioptikon makes an appearance, though that's not his weapon of choice here. It's more powerful, more destructive than that "So go my little love. Touch the world. Eat their hearts and poison their dreams. Rip their nightmares into the daylight and scum their sleep with creeping fear." A part of me wanted to see him win, just for kicks, but well, that would've been rather sad after a point. Listen: you can hear the screaming. ... Listen. Listen: You can hear sobbing. ... Listen to the anguish of a world in which the bad things are coming out of the dark places. Listen to a world in pain. Listen. You can hear it. ... Listen to the rushing rivers of blood, flowing downwards in a warm torrent. The blood of the weak. Of the helpless. Of the mad. Listen. You can hear it. ... Silence washes like a river over Arkham. No sounds of screaming, no sobbing, no noises of pain or madness. Just peace. The only noise is the gentle, even cadence of people asleep. In, out, in, out. Listen. You can hear it." Dee is, of course, full of his own kind of wisdom. "People think dreams aren't real because they aren't made of matter, of particles. Dreams are real. But they are made of viewpoints of images, of memories and puns and lost hopes." And of course, full of his dreams to become the king of the world. "I'm the King of Dreams. Of everything. But it's funny. I always thought when I became King...I thought there would be applause. I thought someone would say something." Death, Dream's older sister, finally makes an appearance. I love her! From the way she reprimands her brother for being a self-pitying arse "You are utterly the stupidest, most self-centered, appallingest excuse for an anthropomorphic personification on this or any other plane. An infantile, adolescent, pathetic specimen. Feeling all sorry for yourself because your little game is over, and you haven't got the--the balls to go and find a new one!" to the way she handles the delicate nature of her job, "...Gets me down too. Mostly they aren't too keen to see me. They fear the sunless lands. But they enter your realm each night without fear." "And I am far more terrible than you, sister" , Death was pretty damn cool. Here's some food for thought for aspiring writers: All Bette's stories have happy endings. That's because she knows where to stop. She's realized the real problem with stories. If you keep them going long enough, they always end in death. Or not. I just liked the quote, honestly. And finally, the best part. Pop culture references. "Said Tweedledum, "When you're only one of the things in his dream, you know very well you're not real."" Every kid needs Alice in Wonderland. Just like every story needs a raven reference. "The Raven Woman has decayed badly. She lives only in nightmares... We see Paul McGuire reading Stephen King's IT at some point. Ella Fitzgerald really is immortal. Dream a little dream of me... is apparently Constantine's theme song. We also have appearances from the Golden Age Sandman, Etrigan, Mister Miracle and Martian Manhunter. Be still my beating heart. Also, I don't really know how to review comic books.
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  • Sam Quixote
    October 16, 2011
    I read this one some 10 years or so ago when I was slowly returning to comics and, having re-read it now, I still maintain that Preludes and Nocturnes is a poor place to start with this series - though it’s a decent book. My first time around, I read Sandman totally out of sequence starting with Vol 3, then Vol 5, then a couple more volumes (I was just grabbing whatever was on the shelves that week!) and I read Vol 1 towards the end thinking what an unimpressive first volume it was. I’d recommen I read this one some 10 years or so ago when I was slowly returning to comics and, having re-read it now, I still maintain that Preludes and Nocturnes is a poor place to start with this series - though it’s a decent book. My first time around, I read Sandman totally out of sequence starting with Vol 3, then Vol 5, then a couple more volumes (I was just grabbing whatever was on the shelves that week!) and I read Vol 1 towards the end thinking what an unimpressive first volume it was. I’d recommend someone looking to understand the brilliance of this series to start with the standalone books, Vol 3 and Vol 6 rather than with Vol 1 - those are much more representative of why people love Sandman so much. Alright - enough prelude! Onto the… nocturnes… ?Set in the early 20th century, an Aleister Crowley-esque type tries to summon Death and gain immortality - except he botches the spell and gets Dream instead. Dream is imprisoned for 70 years until he escapes and begins to resume his role in the universe. But first he must gather his instruments: his helm, his dreamstone, and his bag of sand. My biggest complaint of this book is the same criticism I have for a lot of Neil Gaiman’s work: the pacing is much too slow. But this is especially pronounced in a comic! Gaiman’s style was - and is - that of a long-winded storyteller who can spin a good yarn but will not be rushed and this can lead to a much less exciting read. Not only that but he comes from the Alan Moore school of writing comics where each page is severely bogged down with blocks of text. Though, unlike Moore, its more clumsy in this one and feels like Gaiman is still learning to write comics by trying to make his novelistic approach fit a different genre and not quite succeeding. That and Gaiman clearly hasn’t found his voice yet. The first volume is very horror-centric in sharp contrast to the rest of the series which leaves this hackneyed approach behind to successfully blend fantasy, the cosmic, and Gaiman’s own style into something unique. It’s a bit of a muddle to wade through which is why it’s a bit unfortunate that this is the first volume where a lot of people will start and which is bound to put some readers off from sampling the rest of this excellent series. You can also see Gaiman relying a bit too much on the DC Universe in this first volume whereas later - though some DCU characters and locations crop up now and then - Sandman’s original cast becomes the central focus. Arkham Asylum puts in a cameo where we meet Jonathan Crane aka Scarecrow, and, as Dream sets about collecting his necessaries, he encounters John Constantine, Martian Manhunter, and Etrigan. We also meet a lot of new characters who will go on to become quite beloved by the fans: Cain and Abel, Lucien, the Hecateae, Lucifer Morningstar (who will get his own spin-off title), and, arguably the most popular character Gaiman’s ever created, Death, Dream’s sister (who also gets a couple of standalone books). Besides introducing characters, Gaiman’s first go at Sandman indicates the kind of series it will become. While Gaiman references earlier incarnations of the character like the 1930s Wesley Dodds Sandman (Dream’s helm looks a lot like Dodds’ gas mask), and a dream sequence drawn in a Jack Kirby style (a nod to the 1970s Kirby Sandman), Gaiman’s Sandman is decidedly more modern and set in a richly imaginative world. Beginning to distance itself from the DCU, Gaiman’s Sandman goes to Hell, he battles an evil magician across space and time, and, more importantly, he begins to explore the potential of dreams. This is the reason behind the series’ success: dreams. Because ANYTHING can happen in a dream meaning anything can happen in this series and you can see Gaiman beginning to realise that potential in this book. In one particular dream sequence the art switches to pure Kirby so we suddenly get a three-page Fourth World-esque strip out of nowhere! I know some people don’t like Sam Kieth’s art in this book and, to be honest, when I first read this I didn’t much care for it either. But I’ve since read Kieth’s The Maxx and come to a new appreciation of his style. His art in this book is more restrained than in The Maxx but he brings the fantastic when he needs to and the kind of bizarre comics he creates is a good fit for the type of comic Sandman is aiming for. Mike Dringenberg and Malcolm Jones III’s art is also very good though, going back to the horror theme, there’s far too much black on the pages. There’s a lot to like about this first volume: a lot of ideas and imagination swirling together, some great episodes like Dream going to Hell and meeting Lucifer, or John Dee’s 24 hour nightmare issue in the diner, and Dream and Death’s first scene together. But there’s a lot of chaff here too and it’s less like reading a comic and feels too often like reading an illustrated book. Sandman Vol 1 might not be a great comic but it leads into a great series and, if you weren’t that impressed after reading this and was wondering what all the fuss is about, keep going because it gets a lot better very quickly. Better yet, skip Vol 1 entirely and come back to it later!
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  • Hazal Çamur
    October 31, 2016
    Harika çeviri, harika baskı, harika kurgu.Neil Gaiman bize Sandman’i sunarken peşi sıra bir o kadar da birikim getirmiş. Çünkü Sandman’in bu ilk cildinde Homeros’un Odysseia’sından İncil’e; John Milton’ın Kayıp Cenneti’nden Shakespeare’in Julius Caeser ve Macbeth oyunlarına; Dante’nin Cehennem’inden (Inferno) Mary Poppins’e kadar uzun bir yol var.Edebi olduğu kadar "ebedi" de bir eser. İyi ki Elif Ersavcı çevirmiş de repliklerin şiirselliğini yitirmemişiz. Kendisine tekrar hayran kaldım.
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  • Nihan
    October 14, 2016
    Allah
  • Algernon
    May 11, 2013
    Sandman has been on my radar for years. In a way I'm glad I've waited, because now that I've read 4 or 5 of the author's other books, I have a better idea of his style and thematic preferences and I can appreciate better how innovative and original his approach to the sequential art medium is. Urban fantasy that doesn't limits itself to crime investigations and vampires versus werewolves, superheroes that are fallible and make mistakes, adult content that doesn't drown you in bad language, nudi Sandman has been on my radar for years. In a way I'm glad I've waited, because now that I've read 4 or 5 of the author's other books, I have a better idea of his style and thematic preferences and I can appreciate better how innovative and original his approach to the sequential art medium is. Urban fantasy that doesn't limits itself to crime investigations and vampires versus werewolves, superheroes that are fallible and make mistakes, adult content that doesn't drown you in bad language, nudity and explosions. Best of all is Dream - the main protagonist, the master of imagination, of nightmares and desires, playing loose with time and the fabric of reality. Of his sibling, one of them appears in the last issue (8) , but she's great and I hope more of them will put in a appearance. Not being well versed in comic book lore, I probably missed a lot of references to charatcers and events from the DC universe, but not enough to make the plot hard to follow.Preludes and Nocturnes is just the opening gambit of what promises to be a very interesting journey. I liked Gaiman writing, but the graphic artists were uneven. I particularly disliked the last 4 books in the sequence for the blocky, unpolished look. I felt like I was looking sometimes at the sketchboards for the storyline instead of at the finished product. I browsed through later books in the series and I know things improve, so I'm really looking forward to continuing with it.
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  • Ronyell
    March 8, 2012
    6 stars! “In a fairy tale story, once all the children are asleep, the Sandman will come in and sprinkle magic dust in children’s eyes and give them sweet dreams.” At least, that is the interpretation we get about the Sandman. However, in this graphic novel, we are about to enter a world where the Sandman is a magical being of the Dream world, but the world of the Sandman is much darker and more disturbing than you can ever imagine! “The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes” is a comic series writt 6 stars! “In a fairy tale story, once all the children are asleep, the Sandman will come in and sprinkle magic dust in children’s eyes and give them sweet dreams.” At least, that is the interpretation we get about the Sandman. However, in this graphic novel, we are about to enter a world where the Sandman is a magical being of the Dream world, but the world of the Sandman is much darker and more disturbing than you can ever imagine! “The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes” is a comic series written by none other than Neil Gaiman himself and it details the beginning of how the Sandman came to be and his mission in retrieving his lost tools.The story starts off with a man named Roderick Burgess who wanted to prevent death from happening around the world by summoning Death and then imprisoning it. When Burgess starts his summoning spell, he ended up getting Death’s younger brother Dream and ended up imprisoning him for seventy years, while stealing Dream’s three tools. When Dream is finally released, he wrecks his revenge on Roderick’s son, Alex who was the surviving family member of the Burgesses and he sets out on finding his three tools which were: a pouch of sand, the helm and the ruby (moonstone). Can Dream find all of these items before the world fall into turmoil? There are a total of eight stories in this novel and they are: Sleep of the JustImperfect HostsDream a Little, Dream of MeA Hope in HellPassengers24 HoursSound and FuryThe Sound of Her Wings To be honest, I have never heard of Neil Gaiman’s “Sandman” series until I had read so many positive reviews on it on Goodreads and I have decided to give this series a try. Well, I have the honor to say that I was totally blown away by this introductory novel! Neil Gaiman has done a brilliant job at writing this collection of stories about the Sandman as the stories are dark yet engaging to read at the same time! I loved the way that Neil Gaiman put a new and disturbing spin on the classic children’s fairy tale of the Sandman by actually portraying the Sandman (who is called Dream in this version) as a powerful being who is able to rule the Dream world and even has a powerful influence on the surreal worlds he visits when he was on his mission to retrieve his stolen items. I also loved how the mythology of dreams is fitted in perfectly in this story, which gives this story an extremely creative and authentic feel to the dream world. Neil Gaiman also gives the Sandman a somewhat dark personality throughout this whole novel, which is greatly justified by the fact that he was captured and kept prisoner for over seventy years and he had to deal with the fact that his tools were stolen from him. I also enjoyed the way that Neil Gaiman made the narration of this book somewhat surreal since most of the time, the plot tends to jump around in the story so many times. However, this is to be expected since the majority of the story takes place in the peoples’ dreams and most of the time, dreams do not usually make any sense. Sam Kieth, Mike Dringenberg and Malcolm Jones III’s artwork are extremely effective and haunting at the same time. The artwork sort of reminds me of the older DC comics back in the 80s and I loved the realistic and retro style of the characters in this novel as it gives the stories in this novel a sort crime noir feel. I also loved how the artwork is dark and surreal at the same time as there are many images of people being killed in their dreams and many images of demons when the Sandman goes to the Underworld. The image that really stood out to me was the image of the Sandman himself as he looks like a young man with a pale face and rock star hair that sticks out in all places. His appearance sort of reminds me of Edward Scissorhands as he also has spiky hair and a pale face.Surprisingly, this graphic novel has many disturbing scenes of people getting killed in their dreams. Some of the disturbing images in this book has scenes of the Sandman being surrounded by demons when he goes to the Underworld and some images of people being killed in their dreams such as a person’s head is suddenly cut off and the severed head is still talking and a person stick nails in their eyes. If you are uncomfortable with violent and disturbing images, then this book might be a bit too difficult to get through.Overall, “The Sandman: Preludes and Nocturnes” is a fantastic read for fans of Neil Gaiman’s work and readers who love dark and gritty graphic novels! I would recommend this series to teens ages sixteen and up since there is so much dark subject matter in this graphic novel. Now I am off to read the second volume, The Sandman, Vol. 2: The Doll's House.Review is also on: Rabbit Ears Book Blog
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  • Panagiotis
    November 27, 2016
    Η ανάγνωση του Σάντμαν, δηλαδή η ώρα που έφτανε να ανοίξω τις σελίδες του, ήταν μια μαγική στιγμή. Την καθυστερούσα, την προσέγγιζα σταδιακά. Ενόσω ο Γκέιμαν άρχισε να γίνεται ένας από τους αγαπημένους μου συγγραφείς, άρχισα να μαθαίνω περισσότερα για το κόμικ. Δεν το αγόρασα αμέσως, όχι. Πέρασε καιρός, μέχρι που πήρα τον πρώτο τόμο και ακολούθως συγκέντρωσα μερικούς ακόμα. Η διαδικασία που περιέγραψα μπορεί και να πήρε και δυο χρόνια μέχρι να ξεκινήσω αυτόν τον τόμο. Ίσως οι περισσότεροι να μην Η ανάγνωση του Σάντμαν, δηλαδή η ώρα που έφτανε να ανοίξω τις σελίδες του, ήταν μια μαγική στιγμή. Την καθυστερούσα, την προσέγγιζα σταδιακά. Ενόσω ο Γκέιμαν άρχισε να γίνεται ένας από τους αγαπημένους μου συγγραφείς, άρχισα να μαθαίνω περισσότερα για το κόμικ. Δεν το αγόρασα αμέσως, όχι. Πέρασε καιρός, μέχρι που πήρα τον πρώτο τόμο και ακολούθως συγκέντρωσα μερικούς ακόμα. Η διαδικασία που περιέγραψα μπορεί και να πήρε και δυο χρόνια μέχρι να ξεκινήσω αυτόν τον τόμο. Ίσως οι περισσότεροι να μην ξέρουν για τί μιλάω, σίγουρα όμως κάθε άνθρωπος που έχει βρεθεί στην θέση του φαν, του αμετάπειστου ακόλουθου ενός καλλιτέχνη, έχει βρεθεί σ' αυτή την θέση που μεταχειρίζεται ένα έργο με μια μαζοχιστική διάθεση.Η εισαγωγή -νομίζω του εκδότη-, καθώς και ο επίλογος του Γκέιμαν, δίνουν μια σωστή, κάπως ρεαλιστική τοποθέτηση για αυτό που κρατάει ο αναγνώστης στα χέρια του: δεν είναι η καρδιά του έργου που έχει ανεβάσει τις προσδοκίες μας πολύ ψηλά - αυτό πρόκειται να το διαβάσει μετέπειτα, καθώς είναι μια διεργασία χρόνια. ένα πείραμα που ξεκινήσε με τα τεύχη τούτου του πρώτου τόμου και εξελίχθηκε σε κάτι που κάνεις δεν περίμενε. Καθώς ο Γκέιμαν έβρισκε την φωνή του στις ιστορίες του Sandman, η σειρά εξελίχθηκε σε μια από τις πιο πετυχημένες της DC. Η αγάπη του συγγραφέα για τους μύθους, για τις προσωποποιίες θεοτήτων και την δύναμη των ιστοριών ως βασικό στοιχείο για την ζωή των ανθρώπων, συναντιέται με εξαιρετικούς καλλιτέχνες που δίνουν εικόνα στα οράματα του Γκέιμαν και προσφέρουν κάτι καλλιτεχνικά εξαιρετικό.Τούτος ο πρώτος τόμος είναι πράγματι μια εισαγωγή και έτσι τον δέχομαι ως αναγνώστης για ό,τι θα ακολουθήσει στους επόμενους. Φαίνεται πως ο Γκέιμαν εδώ προσπαθεί να συστήσει τον ήρωα, αλλά και την ίδια στιγμή να πειραματιστεί, ακροβατώντας μεταξύ του συμβατικού κόσμου της DC (σ' ένα καρέ εμφανίζεται και ο Μπάτμαν) και του πιο προσωπικού δικού του.Τα 4 αστέρια επειδή είναι μέρους ενός συνόλου πολύ καλύτερου.
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  • Aziz Varlık
    December 24, 2016
    İkinci kez okuyorum. Çevirisi çok daha başarılı. Ve tabi baskı kaliteside.
  • Stuart
    July 8, 2013
    Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman is such a legendary comic series that it needs no introduction at this point. It ran from 1989 to 1996 as the flagship series for DC imprint Vertigo Comics, indicating a shift to more mature content. This came shortly after the arrival of Alan Moore’s Watchmen (1986) and Frank Miller’s Batman: Dark Knight Returns (1986), heralding a renaissance in the comic book industry. No longer were writers satisfied with superheroes knocking out super villains with visual sound-eff Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman is such a legendary comic series that it needs no introduction at this point. It ran from 1989 to 1996 as the flagship series for DC imprint Vertigo Comics, indicating a shift to more mature content. This came shortly after the arrival of Alan Moore’s Watchmen (1986) and Frank Miller’s Batman: Dark Knight Returns (1986), heralding a renaissance in the comic book industry. No longer were writers satisfied with superheroes knocking out super villains with visual sound-effects like “Ka-pow!” Comics were being aimed at adults who wanted more sophisticated content, often with darker themes. Over the last year, I’ve been re-introducing myself to comics (or ‘graphic novels’ as they are often called) after a hiatus of 30 years or so. Once I got into SF and fantasy novels, both comics and RPGs quietly got left behind. I don’t remember it being a conscious decision, I simply was so engaged with books that I wanted to dedicate all my reading time to them. And so ground-breaking titles like SANDMAN and Watchmen were only in the periphery of my attention. But ever since joining Fantasy Literature, I’ve been reading fellow reviewer Brad Hawley’s gushing praise of comics and exhortations to give them a chance, particularly people like me who love the SF/fantasy genre but have ignored comics for years. Check out his essays Why You Should Read Comics: A Manifesto! and the 10-part series Reading Comics and you’ll be convinced you’ve been missing out. Since the start of the year, I’ve read Watchmen, V for Vendetta, Batman: Dark Knight Returns, Batman: Year One, SAGA, SIN CITY, and now SANDMAN. Brad Hawley has written comprehensive reviews on the individual SANDMAN titles, as well as an intro to the overall SANDMAN series (click here),so I will not rehash the details. Suffice to say Vol 1 is a fascinating introduction to the world of Morpheus (also known as Dream or the Sandman), one of The Endless (the others including Destiny, Desire, Despair, Delirium, Death, and one missing member). Morpheus is closest with his older sister Death, and both have a strong Goth look, much like members of Flock of Seagulls or Robert Smith from The Cure. Pale white faces, big spiky hair, and all-black wardrobes. And sister Death has a very quirky sense of humor as she gently harvests souls both young and old, happy and sad.Vol 1 begins with Morpheus in a very weakened state, trapped by mere mortals who wish to tap his powers for their own purposes. He is held against his will for 70 years, and is separated with three objects that contain much of his power and vitality — his Pouch, Helm, and Ruby. Much of the book is occupied with Morpheus tracking down these items, each time having to overcome greater obstacles and opposition. In addition, his kingdom, The Dreaming, has fallen into chaos in his absence. His adventures returning to his dream world, descending into Hell, and fighting a powerful villain in a 24-hour diner, are both unique and disturbing, and Dream behaves very differently from what I would have imagined of an immortal being.The storylines, artwork, and dialogue are also wonderfully integrated. Gaiman has pioneered a very unique approach to visual storytelling, incorporating elements of myth, history, fantasy, horror, and understated humor as well. This initial volume also features a lot of DC universe characters that the author initially felt were necessary to the story, but with future volumes this diminishes as he finds his own voice. So some readers might be a bit confused, especially those like me who are not really familiar with the DC universe. However, having read the next few volumes, I would advise not worrying about it too much - they are not crucial to the overarching storyline. And as Brad pointed out, this volume also has some pretty gruesome horror in the 24-hour diner sequence which may upset some readers, but hopefully you can get through that since it is less prominent as the series progresses.I read the first three volumes before deciding that I needed to re-read Vol 1 to really appreciate the details and foreshadowing of events. Once you get to know the world Gaiman has created, you can really grasp what a complex tapestry he is weaving, which will only be fully revealed in the 10-volume, 76-issue series, plus several side volumes and a prequel. I have enjoyed reading it in e-format on Comixology, allowing me to read in anywhere on the PC, iPad, and iPhone. Guided View allows you to go frame by frame, making it a different experience from reading a print copy, but also very flexible.
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  • Caro M.
    March 18, 2014
    I think I'm in love...P.S. (added on 2015/06/23) So I wasn't just trippin'! Lucifer in fact WAS modelled on David Bowie! Artist Kelley Jones revealed in Hanging Out with the Dream King that "Neil was adamant that the Devil was David Bowie. He just said, ‘He is. You must draw David Bowie. Find David Bowie, or I’ll send you David Bowie. Because if it isn’t David Bowie, you’re going to have to redo it until it is David Bowie.’ So I said, ‘Okay, it’s David Bowie..." Yay! (source: http://www.gamesrad I think I'm in love...P.S. (added on 2015/06/23) So I wasn't just trippin'! Lucifer in fact WAS modelled on David Bowie! Artist Kelley Jones revealed in Hanging Out with the Dream King that "Neil was adamant that the Devil was David Bowie. He just said, ‘He is. You must draw David Bowie. Find David Bowie, or I’ll send you David Bowie. Because if it isn’t David Bowie, you’re going to have to redo it until it is David Bowie.’ So I said, ‘Okay, it’s David Bowie..." Yay! (source: http://www.gamesradar.com/11-reasons-...) It's a pity though that later his design had changed. But check Jones' version for yourself...
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  • Crystal Starr Light
    June 29, 2013
    Bullet Review:Neil Gaiman is a master storyteller. I like to think of him as the modern fairytale creator. He is adept at creating unique stories that just blow the mind.This graphic novel is no different, though as early Gaiman works go, it could be seen as "rougher". Make no mistake, it is for MATURE audiences. Rape, brutal murders, drugs - these are just a taste. It can be a bit much, particularly if you aren't expecting it. The art is raw and gritty, perfect for this type of comic, though no Bullet Review:Neil Gaiman is a master storyteller. I like to think of him as the modern fairytale creator. He is adept at creating unique stories that just blow the mind.This graphic novel is no different, though as early Gaiman works go, it could be seen as "rougher". Make no mistake, it is for MATURE audiences. Rape, brutal murders, drugs - these are just a taste. It can be a bit much, particularly if you aren't expecting it. The art is raw and gritty, perfect for this type of comic, though not my particular favorite.I mostly enjoyed myself. The first issue was hard to get through - confusing and lots of bouncing around different viewpoints. Once Dream established himself as the MC, things got better.This collection does nicely tie up loose ends, while keeping things open for new adventures and stories. I will probably be checking out the rest of the series from the library instead of buying them all and be kind to my poor pocketbook.UPDATE: Okay, so this was nice and all, but I honestly think I was being way too gentle on this because of Gaiman. Gaiman is a master creator and while this isn't bad, I can't believe I'd rate it 4 stars. I haven't gone back to this world and honestly have almost zero desire to do so.Also, the art was completely unappealing, even as all the fans were leaping and jumping like they were in a revival over how "amazing" this is. I just. Don't. Get. It.So I'm bumping this to 3 stars.
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  • J.G. Keely
    October 23, 2007
    Though Gaiman had already made his mark with Black Orchid, Sandman is where he really begins to fall into his style, which sometimes becomes his downfall in its predictability.Here, he plays for perhaps the first time at mixing mythology, spirituality, and strange real events into a story beyond the ken of other fairytale rewrites and new age mysticism. There is a sense here that the characters and story are still undeveloped in his mind, which provides the reader with some welcome ambiguity, as Though Gaiman had already made his mark with Black Orchid, Sandman is where he really begins to fall into his style, which sometimes becomes his downfall in its predictability.Here, he plays for perhaps the first time at mixing mythology, spirituality, and strange real events into a story beyond the ken of other fairytale rewrites and new age mysticism. There is a sense here that the characters and story are still undeveloped in his mind, which provides the reader with some welcome ambiguity, as soon he will nail down the characters into something a bit too precise and not quite realistic enough.Of course, this merely becomes his frame around which he tells stories from any place or era which more than make up for the lack of conflict in other parts. The final story in this collection is an exploration of the depths of human desire and control, which recalls to us the depravity of The Lord Of The Flies. It should be unsurprising to us that Sandman became a classic by shocking and questioning its readers, and it must sadden us that no more comics have won the World Fantasy Award since. My Suggested Readings in Comics
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