Apollo (Olympians, #8)
From high atop Olympus, the nine Muses, or Mousai, recount the story of the powerful and quick-tempered Apollo, the Brilliant One. Born of a she-wolf and Zeus, King of Gods, Apollo is destined fro the greatest of victories and most devastating of failures as his temper, privilege, and pride take him into battle with a serpent, in pursuit of a beautiful but unattainable nymph, and into deadly competition with his beloved. Watch closely as Apollo navigates the tumultuous world in which he lives. Will he rise above the rest and fulfill his destiny as the son of Zeus, or will he falter, consumed by his flaws, and destroy all that he touches?

Apollo (Olympians, #8) Details

TitleApollo (Olympians, #8)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 26th, 2016
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626720152
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Mythology, Comics, Young Adult, Greek Mythology

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Apollo (Olympians, #8) Review

  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I do love Mythology. I like how George has a different way of telling the myth for each novel. In this one, he uses the 9 muses who are associated with Apollo to tell 7 short stories about Apollo. I read a lot about mythology and George is always able to put in some little myth that I haven't heard of. Apollo is terribly unlucky in love. He is also a pompous ass, but compelling at the same time. I would say that he or Hermes are probably my favorite male gods in these stories.I love George's art I do love Mythology. I like how George has a different way of telling the myth for each novel. In this one, he uses the 9 muses who are associated with Apollo to tell 7 short stories about Apollo. I read a lot about mythology and George is always able to put in some little myth that I haven't heard of. Apollo is terribly unlucky in love. He is also a pompous ass, but compelling at the same time. I would say that he or Hermes are probably my favorite male gods in these stories.I love George's artwork and the energy that leaps off the page. I like his point of view and story telling. These are great comics for anyone who enjoys myths. I also like that George didn't change the gender of Hyacinth as some stories do. In school Hyacinth was always a girl. George leaves Hyacinth as a male that Apollo is in love with. I hope he tells these stories for years to come. I'm not ready to end this.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    Book released on Jan. 26/16This is another solid entry in O'Connor's Olympians series, this time covering the legends of Apollo who is best known as the sun god (but also holds healing and prophecy, among others, under his purview). As usual, the artwork is very well-done, in the same unique style as O'Connor's other books. And following previous formats, in this book readers can find extras such as Character profiles, as well as interesting facts and notes that O'Connor collected while research Book released on Jan. 26/16This is another solid entry in O'Connor's Olympians series, this time covering the legends of Apollo who is best known as the sun god (but also holds healing and prophecy, among others, under his purview). As usual, the artwork is very well-done, in the same unique style as O'Connor's other books. And following previous formats, in this book readers can find extras such as Character profiles, as well as interesting facts and notes that O'Connor collected while researching the myths themselves. Personally I always find these notes really interesting, with all the little details he discovers and discussions on how the stories varied from place to place and time to time.As usual, while O'Connor covers some of the better-known stories (such as Letos' journey throughout her pregnancy, and the birth of the twins), he also breaks new ground for readers by telling some of the stories that aren't as well-known. Here, these stories include a 'morality tale' of sorts, warning against hubris that is shown through a musical competition between Apollo and a prideful Satyr... which, as isn't unusual for Greek mythology, ends quite badly for the satyr. I was a little surprised, however, in how many stories were included in this volume that I wasn't familiar with - The contest with the satyr, or Apollo fighting the python, and founding the temples, for example. It made for a nice change, as opposed to going over the same stories as many other books of mythology. It also opens readers' eyes to another side of the mythology, as some of the darker myths often get bypassed in the focus on Apollo's roles in music and medicine. I received an ARC/pre-view of this graphic novel from First Second books through Netgalley, in exchange for an honest review.
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  • First Second Books
    January 1, 1970
    We're always excited to publish a new graphic novel by George O'Connor! And how awesome that it's an annual occurrence.(And I think that the gold foil on the cover of this book is an especially good use of foil!)Check this latest Olympians book out for more mythological adventures!
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  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't think this one was as strong as the others. I felt having the muses tell Apollo's stories was distracting, especially the one where the narrative panels were interrupted with interpretive dance. However, other readers might enjoy this ambitious technique. It could also have been less enjoyable because Apollo is just not that sympathetic and interesting of a character when compared to other Olympians. I was moved, however, at the ending as it revisited the beginning. Nicely done there.
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  • Kaethe
    January 1, 1970
    I've written before about how much I love this series of mythology biographies. They are so good that you should read them all right now if you haven't already, and also, buy copies for all the kids you know, who will also love them. If you don't know any kids, make sure the local library has them.One of the great things about them is that in the extensive back matter O'Connor explains his choices and decisions as to which stories to include and how. Great stuff.Library copy
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    4.0Not my favorite Greek God and not my favorite in the series, but I learned a lot.
  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    This was… not the best of O’Connor’s Olympians series. The muses take turns telling a series of little stories about Apollo, but there’s no feel of an overreaching arch or connection besides the fact they are linear, so first you see Apollo as baby, then Apollo as adult, etc. and there is the very loose connecting theme of “inspiration.” The muses were more interesting in their different approaches to storytelling than the god himself. A book focusing on the muses themselves might have worked be This was… not the best of O’Connor’s Olympians series. The muses take turns telling a series of little stories about Apollo, but there’s no feel of an overreaching arch or connection besides the fact they are linear, so first you see Apollo as baby, then Apollo as adult, etc. and there is the very loose connecting theme of “inspiration.” The muses were more interesting in their different approaches to storytelling than the god himself. A book focusing on the muses themselves might have worked better. Also – can’t wait to see a book centering on Dionysus!
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  • Lindsay
    January 1, 1970
    I actually liked Apollo's story. I wasn't sure I would, but it was quite enjoyable.
  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    The nine Muses introduce readers to Apollo.Oh man, is this one hard to rate. So none of the Greek gods are particularly upstanding guys, but Apollo is quite the jerk. He is so egotistical, a bit psychopathic, and highly hypocritical. He falls in love will all sorts of people (several girls and a guy in this story collection, he's not picky), but the penalty for anyone to be untrue to him or spurn him is pretty much always death. Oh, and if you think you're better than him at anything, he'll kill The nine Muses introduce readers to Apollo.Oh man, is this one hard to rate. So none of the Greek gods are particularly upstanding guys, but Apollo is quite the jerk. He is so egotistical, a bit psychopathic, and highly hypocritical. He falls in love will all sorts of people (several girls and a guy in this story collection, he's not picky), but the penalty for anyone to be untrue to him or spurn him is pretty much always death. Oh, and if you think you're better than him at anything, he'll kill you for that too. So Apollo is scoring a negative on the most likable Greek gods contender list. O'Connor even mentions in the back of the book that one of the biggest challenges of this book in the Olympians series is Apollo's character. Sheesh. So why was it hard to rate? Because O'Connor's telling of the tale is peppered with numerous moments of artistic genius. Introducing the nine Muses and having them tell tales with parts of their own specialities was fantastic. From iambic pentameter usage for Euterpe's tale, to Thali and Melpomene telling a tale in drama form, to mime moments for Erato's tale...you can tell he put a lot of thought and effort into this. (And so that you don't miss all of them, read the Geek Notes in the back of the book.) So Apollo himself just gets one star, but Mr. O'Connor's artistic skill bumps it up to three stars.Notes on content: No language issues. No sex scenes. Involved in the plot are lots of love affairs, but no graphic detail. There's one dancing scene with lots of tiny people and there's a few people that are naked, but they all have their backs to the reader and are so tiny it isn't very provocative or noticeable. Some well-known pieces statues are represented in the end, but naked parts of the statues are strategically covered up. One of the tales involves Apollo skinning someone alive and hanging up the hide. There are other acts of violence, but that was definitely the worst. Blood is shown from a deadly head wound in another tale.
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  • Siina
    January 1, 1970
    Err, I don't know why the story was told twice, perhaps there was some error with the assembling or something like it? I've always loved Greek mythology since I was in junior high. Basically I know a lot about it and thus it was fun to read this to see how much I still remembered. Apollo is surely a great character, though the instances used in this comic were scarce and kind of sporadic. In a way this comic suffers from a lack of structure. Apollo: The Brilliant One would've needed "a plot" or Err, I don't know why the story was told twice, perhaps there was some error with the assembling or something like it? I've always loved Greek mythology since I was in junior high. Basically I know a lot about it and thus it was fun to read this to see how much I still remembered. Apollo is surely a great character, though the instances used in this comic were scarce and kind of sporadic. In a way this comic suffers from a lack of structure. Apollo: The Brilliant One would've needed "a plot" or so to speak to tie the story arc better instead of the loose structure that it now has. Also, it would've been great if O'Connor had explained why he chose these stories into the book and why the order was what it was. I liked the notes and presentations a lot. The presentations would fit the first pages better really, since most people don't know the characters so well and it would help the reading experience.The art is so and so. It's painfully obvious that the comic has been made by computer as the lines turn somewhat pixel-like. The colors are too much like basic splotches and there's hardly any shading. This makes the comic look cheap, sadly so. The panels are quite empty most of the time and there's mostly just talking heads, which makes this somewhat boring. More movement would've made this so much better and why use the muses so much? Telling the story with Apollo in them works better than just the muses explaining the stuff. The comic felt lazy and the questions got me wondering if this was meant for schools or something like it, but Apollo surely is too plain to get kids interested in this.
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  • Nicola Mansfield
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge fan of this series and Apollo was all that I expected it to be. O'Connor has changed his narrative style several times with these books and here he switches once more from just telling a narrative tale. The nine muses gather together to tell us several of Apollo's deeds and misadventures through their eyes, letting Apollo speak for himself frequently so we don't miss out on his self-idolatry pomposity. Apollo is only out for himself and it is hard to care for him, especially when a gi I'm a huge fan of this series and Apollo was all that I expected it to be. O'Connor has changed his narrative style several times with these books and here he switches once more from just telling a narrative tale. The nine muses gather together to tell us several of Apollo's deeds and misadventures through their eyes, letting Apollo speak for himself frequently so we don't miss out on his self-idolatry pomposity. Apollo is only out for himself and it is hard to care for him, especially when a girl would rather be a tree than the next wife on his list, but one person he truly did care for was his son and when Zeus kills him we get shown and understand that bit of half-mortalness inside him. Usually, the stuff that happens in these books is fairly basic for someone who has done a lot of greek myth reading but I was pleasantly surprised to find quite a bit of new information in this one for me. Admittedly, I can't recall Apollo being a big feature in much I've read so I really enjoyed the information on his son, Asclepius. Lovely, exciting, interesting book to add to the collection, as usual! Looking forward to the next one, as usual!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a firm fan of this series focusing on Gods and Goddesses of Mount Olympus and was thrilled to find a book devoted to Apollo. The son of Zeus and a she-wolf, Apollo is blessed with many gifts, but he is also has many imperfections or character flaws. As the Muses who tell his story make abundantly clear, Apollo has long inspired humans, partly because of his greatness, but also because he possesses so many of the foibles of humans. His arrogance about his musical talent leads him to a terribl I'm a firm fan of this series focusing on Gods and Goddesses of Mount Olympus and was thrilled to find a book devoted to Apollo. The son of Zeus and a she-wolf, Apollo is blessed with many gifts, but he is also has many imperfections or character flaws. As the Muses who tell his story make abundantly clear, Apollo has long inspired humans, partly because of his greatness, but also because he possesses so many of the foibles of humans. His arrogance about his musical talent leads him to a terribly cruel act against a satyr who thought he could compete with the god and his inability to take no for an answer results in Daphne becoming a laurel tree rather than submitting to his advances. The panels in this graphic novel are beautifully drawn and impressive on every level, almost Olympic in their depiction of his story. Oh, how I would have cherished this book and this series when I was a middle grader fascinated by the Greek and Roman gods and goddesses!
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    He was stunning.He was an inspiration.He was ruthless & vengeful.Apollo was pure bliss and pure sorrow, but nothing in between.As always, O'Connor delivers a great narrative based on his research and artistic style. But in this collection, I especially enjoyed the creative use of episodic stories from the point of view of seven of the muses themselves. In doing so, O'Connor creates much needed distance between the reader & the nearly unknowable & tragic Greek God, Apollo.The unique n He was stunning.He was an inspiration.He was ruthless & vengeful.Apollo was pure bliss and pure sorrow, but nothing in between.As always, O'Connor delivers a great narrative based on his research and artistic style. But in this collection, I especially enjoyed the creative use of episodic stories from the point of view of seven of the muses themselves. In doing so, O'Connor creates much needed distance between the reader & the nearly unknowable & tragic Greek God, Apollo.The unique narrative style makes this addition both enjoyable and solid stand alone book. When viewed from a lens within the series, I will be interested in seeing how these tales contribute to the overall flow of the series after it's all said and done!May Apollo's stories shine brightly for readers everywhere!Thank you to :01 First Second for providing me with this copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Misty
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series. I'm a huge mythology nerd, and have been for literally as long as I can remember (one of my earliest memories is of repeated watchings of Clash of the Titans with my dad. I think we drove my mom nuts with how much we watched that movie, and similar others), so this series is always a win for me. This one is interesting because it's told by each of the Muses, in turn, so you're kind of getting a two-for-one: Apollo and the Muses. On a personal note: I delighted in seeing Apoll I love this series. I'm a huge mythology nerd, and have been for literally as long as I can remember (one of my earliest memories is of repeated watchings of Clash of the Titans with my dad. I think we drove my mom nuts with how much we watched that movie, and similar others), so this series is always a win for me. This one is interesting because it's told by each of the Muses, in turn, so you're kind of getting a two-for-one: Apollo and the Muses. On a personal note: I delighted in seeing Apollo get called out for his general douchebaggery. ^_^
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  • Christina Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    Readers who enjoy Greek mythology will also enjoy O’Connor’s latest addition to this series about the Olympians. Although this title is a collection of vignettes that present lesser known aspects of the god’s personality, both its content and treatment are less brilliant than the immediate predecessor about Ares. Therefore, I recommend that this title only be acquired as an additional purchase with the intent to complete a series - rather than based on its stand-alone merits.
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked it, but I kept waiting for the story about how he pulled the sun...or some other story about the sun. I guess my education in mythology was under-informed, because it's possible that he may not have had that role...? I'm so confused, but I wish that O'Conner would have addressed that. I believe that he hinted at it in his foot notes, but I would have preferred a straightforward comment.
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  • MC Bonet
    January 1, 1970
    Another great book about the Olympians from George O'Connor. Truth be told, I love these books. It brings the legends and myths of these gods in an easy to understand format with great art. Like a lot of these gods, Apollo is full of himself. A caution to some young readers, some of the stories of Apollo are a bit too violent.
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  • Amanda [Novel Addiction]
    January 1, 1970
    Another good volume in the Olympians series! The art continues to be very well done, and the stories make for some very artistic scenes. Each of Apollo's tales are told from the point of view of one (or more) Muses, making for an interesting story dynamic. Received a copy of this in exchange for a fair and honest review. Full review will be up on my blog in July 2015.
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    Another worthy addition to a great series. I liked the way the Muses tied everything together. The footnotes, as always, add a lot to this version and point out some of the interesting choices O'Connor made.
  • Austin Phadoungsyavong
    January 1, 1970
    I wonder Zeus have more children from human woman make me hard think what his plan for Zeus want new family then whatever about Apollo want future or something when he was child and nothing answer maybe he get future and became archer god.
  • Tera
    January 1, 1970
    While not great it was still a good book. Only fault for me was that it wasn't as strong as the previous ones. I'd suggest new readers of the series start with Apollo and then read the others.arc from NetGalley
  • Maximilian Lee
    January 1, 1970
    I liked this book because it was had a lot of information. I didn't know about most of the book at first.
  • OpenBookSociety.com
    January 1, 1970
    http://openbooksociety.com/article/ap...Apollo: The Brilliant OneThe Olympians Book 8By George O’ConnorISBN 978-1-62672-015-2Brought to you by OBS Reviewer ScottFor lovers of Greek mythology, Apollo: The Brilliant One is not going to offer anything new to your folklore except, perhaps, for a change of view. Tracing the most “Greek” of all the deities, George O’Connor, exposes seven tales of the Brilliant one, Apollo of Olympus. The tales are by no means unusual for Greek mythos, but the stories http://openbooksociety.com/article/ap...Apollo: The Brilliant OneThe Olympians Book 8By George O’ConnorISBN 978-1-62672-015-2Brought to you by OBS Reviewer ScottFor lovers of Greek mythology, Apollo: The Brilliant One is not going to offer anything new to your folklore except, perhaps, for a change of view. Tracing the most “Greek” of all the deities, George O’Connor, exposes seven tales of the Brilliant one, Apollo of Olympus. The tales are by no means unusual for Greek mythos, but the stories he chooses resonate and impact the reader hard. Shining an illuminating (both figuratively and literally) light on the sun god through the words of the Oracles of Delphi, Apollo’s chosen representatives on the earthly plane, O’Connor manages to keep sometimes dry myths interesting and invocative.Plot wise, this is a pastiche of seven unconnected tales. Told by the muses, in pairs sometimes, each tale is a reflection of the muse(s) telling the tale, as well as the tale itself. This connects the tales in an awkward 1001 Arabian Nights feel, without the building tension. The tales ebb and flow with only the muses holding it together. Each tale in and of itself is well written; the dialogue, though, seems somewhat forced – as if trying to cry for more artistic license. The pacing of the stories also is a little stilted, probably due to the fact that there is no real overhanging story arc. Bearing in mind, that, Apollo: The Brilliant One is a nice easy read, without having to put too much thought into. Graphic novel format, for this book, at least, is its one saving grace: it lies in its artwork.The art in Apollo: The Brilliant One is simply fantastic. Subtle nuances are aplenty and each figure, each form takes on a life of its own. From the opening vistas of the inside of Delphi to its panoramic overviews; from hideous, mammoth, intelligent snakes to the arrows Apollo shoots; from the passive tale to the most action packed; the art remains elegant, and sophisticated. Delicate lines and open space doesn’t hurt the eye and the lavish coloring is a wonder to behold, giving it almost a Jean Giraud (Mobius) like feel. I almost felt the wings of reptilian Azarch creatures, as I marveled at a skillfully drawn picture of Apollo in his chariot being drawn by the mighty swans. The art engages the reader, and sets the pace, almost independently of the narrative. It skillfully guides but doesn’t push the reader into turning the page. It’s that good.For fans of Greek mythology, the movies Thor and such or for readers who are interested in a different take on classic tales (there’s extensive author’s notes in the back), this is probably your book. For lovers of paneled art, this is a must have for your shelf. The book may be the 8th in the Olympians saga, but it stands on its own. If you ever wanted to know more about Apollo: The Brilliant One this graphic novel is a good place to start.
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  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    Apollo, like a lot of the Greek gods, didn’t necessarily have one sphere of influence. He was the god of magic, the arts, healing, archery and plagues (Wth?!? That’s news to me!). But, if most people think of him, they remember his affinity for the arts, those splendid gifts that raise humans from the mere muck from which they are created. Music, literature, dance, poetry, history, et al., are all seen as things under his powerful influence. What’s not to love about all that? As always, Mr. O’Co Apollo, like a lot of the Greek gods, didn’t necessarily have one sphere of influence. He was the god of magic, the arts, healing, archery and plagues (Wth?!? That’s news to me!). But, if most people think of him, they remember his affinity for the arts, those splendid gifts that raise humans from the mere muck from which they are created. Music, literature, dance, poetry, history, et al., are all seen as things under his powerful influence. What’s not to love about all that? As always, Mr. O’Connor looks into the underpinnings behind the myth of this fascinating and difficult god. While Apollo remains as golden and shining as when he was first imagined, there are dark aspects to his nature. Like many of the gods, he doesn’t take well to slights, hubris or loss. He’s selfish, cruel, prideful and vengeful. While he brought many blessings to human beings, he doesn’t seem to like them particularly…unless he falls madly in love with one or another of them.So many of the Greek gods and goddesses lost their mortal lovers to tragic ends. But Apollo seems singularly cursed; almost every single one of his amours suffered some horrid fate (occasionally at the hands of the god himself). Given that he had an oracle working for him, you’d think he’d know how badly all his affairs would turn out and avoid getting involved. Oh well. I guess even gods can be fools for love. (Another bonus: this novel doesn’t shy away from the homosexual nature of the passionate Greek gods; it touches on Apollo’s love for the ill-fated Hyacinthus.)The story is a fair mix of joy and sorrow. In a different move from many of the other books in this series, the main story is told from the viewpoint of the Muses, nine goddesses and half-sisters to Apollo himself. In impartial tones, they lay out his greatest triumphs and failures, each bringing her own unique aspect to his tale. In a way, this story is as much about them as it is about the god himself. I especially liked the exchanges between Melpomene and Thalia as they told the tragicomic tale of Marsyas. This graphic novel surprises with its originality and makes Apollo so strange yet so very impressive. Mr. O’Connor does make an odd change to the myth: Apollo’s chariot is drawn by swans instead of horses as I was always told. However, he may have done this because so much emphasis was placed on horses in his tale about Poseidon and he may have wanted to make a distinction between the two of them.This graphic novel takes its place next to my top two favorites from this series: Athena and Hades. I look forward to reading Mr. O’Connor’s takes on other gods and goddesses in the Olympic pantheon.
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  • Shachi Adiga
    January 1, 1970
    I overall really loved the comic, especially the ending! I bought Apollo and Hermes comics together, and I have to say, George was so biased and could have done so much more with Apollo.Let me first talk about Apollo, and then the book. Like most of us know, Apollo is not a very friendly god. He has flaws, but he is not unreasonable. Like flaying of Marsyas. It was cruel of Apollo, but it was equally arrogant of the satyr as well. Tell me which god would not be pissed off if some mortal insults I overall really loved the comic, especially the ending! I bought Apollo and Hermes comics together, and I have to say, George was so biased and could have done so much more with Apollo.Let me first talk about Apollo, and then the book. Like most of us know, Apollo is not a very friendly god. He has flaws, but he is not unreasonable. Like flaying of Marsyas. It was cruel of Apollo, but it was equally arrogant of the satyr as well. Tell me which god would not be pissed off if some mortal insults them? I can state at least 2 instances where Artemis was cold to her own hunters. Hermes turned 2 people into bear for calling him a thief (which he is!). Every god has displayed their wraths in extreme ways. So let's not blame only Apollo. Apart from that, there are kinder things Apollo has did, like raising of the centaur Chrion. He is also caring towards his other children, where he sent wolves to nurse his abandoned kid, or turned his kid into a swan when he tried to kill himself. When a lady he was wooing jumped off a cliff, he turned her into a nymph so that she can live and let her go. Honestly, he is so much more than a wrathful, jealous god. He is the god of knowledge, order and civilization. He is not just brutal. He is also kind. And every other god is that way. But apparently George decided to ignore all the tales that would portray Apollo as a good god, and focused on more popular tales where he was seemingly a monster. Whatever. I wish more people would look into other tales of Apollo and learn more rather than just stopping here. Apollo is very very complex, and I just adore him.Now about the book, I really like the way Muses narrated the tales. I like the poetic narration. The art was..... okay, I'd say. Apollo is described as the most handsome of all the gods, but, he wasn't that handsome if you ask me. I loved the way Hyacinth's tale was written and drawn. I was very deeply touched with the ending. It shows just how much complex Apollo is, and gives a hint on why, in spite of having infamous tales, Apollo was one of the most worshipped god. It's really sad that many of the people write him off as an egoistical jerk.If anything, this book only made me love Apollo more. Even though it could have been a lot better, it's still very enjoyable!
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  • Alina Liu
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, Apollo's mom suffered through a lot to deliver Artemis and him.
  • Kimber
    January 1, 1970
    This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.In the eighth book of the Olympians series by George O'Connor the muses, or mousai, tell 7 tales of Apollo, all displaying his faults and his humanity, which O'Connor presents as a way of showing that Apollo, the most Greek of the gods, was also the most human, and it is this humanity that enamors so many to him.O'Connor has taken on a difficult god in this book because Apollo doesn't have this massive ove This is a trimmed down version of my review, to view the full review visit The Book Ramble.In the eighth book of the Olympians series by George O'Connor the muses, or mousai, tell 7 tales of Apollo, all displaying his faults and his humanity, which O'Connor presents as a way of showing that Apollo, the most Greek of the gods, was also the most human, and it is this humanity that enamors so many to him.O'Connor has taken on a difficult god in this book because Apollo doesn't have this massive overarching story we can follow, and he doesn't have one, big, famous story, he has a bunch of lesser known stories. I didn't know a lot about him going into this book, but by the end I was just thinking "jeez this guy's kind of an asshole", true of all gods, but there was something pretty extraordinarily interesting about this particular brand of asshole that makes this book really great still.Apollo is incredibly human, all of his stories are just depressing, nothing good seemed to happen to this guy at all. But that's so astonishingly human it makes you care about him in a weird way. I wasn't a huge fan of the stories, except the story of Daphne which I already knew, but I think O'Connor really accomplished something amazing in the way he presented the stories. He made me care about a god I had no interest in, and he tied together a bunch of seemingly random stories to make a really compelling narrative through the muses.The art was of course on point as well. I am excited to see more of this series in the future and highly recommend the series!
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  • Rummanah (Books in the Spotlight)
    January 1, 1970
    Unlike the previous installments of the Olympian series, Apollo's graphic novel is narrated by the nine Muses who were also worshiped along with the Greek deity. Each muse tells a different story featuring Apollo and they all paint him as a tragic hero "who has had many loves, but whose loves seldom prosper." O'Connor successfully shows different aspects of Apollo's personality through a variety of myths, some of which I was familiar with before and a few others that I did not know. We witness A Unlike the previous installments of the Olympian series, Apollo's graphic novel is narrated by the nine Muses who were also worshiped along with the Greek deity. Each muse tells a different story featuring Apollo and they all paint him as a tragic hero "who has had many loves, but whose loves seldom prosper." O'Connor successfully shows different aspects of Apollo's personality through a variety of myths, some of which I was familiar with before and a few others that I did not know. We witness Apollo the hero when he goes off to avenge his mother, Leto, by defeating Python, the humongous serpent who had harried Leto at Hera's instigation, with fiery arrows. We also watch Apollo's ill luck with finding love as he lusts and chases after the nymph Daphne who would much rather be transformed into a laurel instead of being with him, kill his lover Hyacinth, the Prince of Sparta, who was killed by a misguided discus he threw and was led by the winds of a jealous Zephyr, and have his sister shoot the unfaithful mother of his own not-yet born son, Aklepios. In addition to theses heartaches, we also see the majestic Apollo as he reminds everyone that he is indeed the greatest musician ever created after he gruesomely skins the hubris satyr Marsyas and wears it as his cape. Perhaps out of all of these different sides to Apollo, what struck me the most was the parental side of Apollo as he watched helplessly as his gifted son who healed many mortals be killed for upsetting Hades. As we wrap up the graphic novel, we can't help but think that the Muses maybe right in stating that Apollo is the most human out of all of the Greek gods and goddesses.
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  • Connor Bates
    January 1, 1970
    Apollo (Olympians #8) by George O’Connor is a comic book style graphic novel about the life of the Greek God, Apollo. Although I found it difficult to read personally due to having little experience with graphic novels, I can see how this book can be of interest to other readers, specifically upper middle school and high schoolers. O’Connor does an amazing job syncing the emotions of the characters in the story with the illustrations. The theme and tone can be felt before you even read a word Apollo (Olympians #8) by George O’Connor is a comic book style graphic novel about the life of the Greek God, Apollo. Although I found it difficult to read personally due to having little experience with graphic novels, I can see how this book can be of interest to other readers, specifically upper middle school and high schoolers. O’Connor does an amazing job syncing the emotions of the characters in the story with the illustrations. The theme and tone can be felt before you even read a word on the page. In addition to this, the peri-text and backmatter with information about the characters and story is extremely helpful to the reader, as the story can get confusing to people who have little background knowledge in Greek Mythology. When I picked up this book I was hoping it would be something I could suggest to fourth to sixth graders, as that is the age of students I work with. I was extremely disappointed that the reading level and some of the themes that were brought up seem to be something that upper middle schoolers, and high schoolers could read, but it is a little too mature for my upper elementary students. Although this was a disappointment, I can easily see how these books can be used in conjunction with, and as a resource for a Greek Mythology lesson in upper middle school or high school. I would suggest this book to a mature middle school reader, or high schooler that enjoys Greek Mythology or comic books, as it can open up more interest in the subject, as well as into reading longer, more dense books.
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  • Ang
    January 1, 1970
    Apollo: The Brilliant One is about Apollo and how he came to be. We also get to meet his mother Leto and his sister Artemis and his nine muses. Each muse helps to tell us tales of Apollo, good and bad. The first tale is about how Leto gave birth to Artemis and Apollo, in the following story we see Apollo defeat the serpent python and how he created Delphi out of Pythia. We also witness the tale of Daphne and how she became a tree, and how Apollo came to be adorned in laurels. We also get to lear Apollo: The Brilliant One is about Apollo and how he came to be. We also get to meet his mother Leto and his sister Artemis and his nine muses. Each muse helps to tell us tales of Apollo, good and bad. The first tale is about how Leto gave birth to Artemis and Apollo, in the following story we see Apollo defeat the serpent python and how he created Delphi out of Pythia. We also witness the tale of Daphne and how she became a tree, and how Apollo came to be adorned in laurels. We also get to learn about the origin of aulos, the double flute. Apparently, it's a creation of Athena's... who knew (at least according to this series). Of course, the aulos leads us into Marsyas' gory tale. We also learn about Hyacinth and Asklepios and the origins of hospitals and doctors and why the medical symbol is a serpent around a staff. I've always wondered how this symbol came to be representative of the medical field. Now, I know and it's an interesting tale.This volume to me was one of the more intriguing and interesting volumes because I had no knowledge of who Apollo was or any tales attributed to him. So reading this was quite interesting. I would say out of all of the gods and goddesses (just going off the context of this series alone), that Apollo is the most complex of the gods. Apollo inspires the muses, who in turn inspires poets, writers, musicians, dancers, etc. So, I guess that makes sense that a god who has nine muses should be a bit on the complex side. I enjoyed reading this volume and I'm curious to see what will be in store for Artemis' volume.
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