Artemis (Olympians, #9)
Shunned even before she was born and destined to live a life of solitude, Artemis, Goddess of the Hunt, finds power through her skilled hunting ability and mighty bow. She slays those who wish to do harm to the innocent and takes care of the young and helpless. She protects women and young girls, helps in childbirth, soothes, and is unrivaled in her hunting abilities. In the latest volume of Olympians, New York Times–bestselling author George O'Connor continues to turn his extensive knowledge of the original Greek myths into rip-roaring graphic novel storytelling.

Artemis (Olympians, #9) Details

TitleArtemis (Olympians, #9)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 31st, 2017
PublisherFirst Second
ISBN-139781626725218
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Fantasy, Mythology, Comics, Young Adult, Childrens, Middle Grade

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Artemis (Olympians, #9) Review

  • Calista
    January 1, 1970
    I adore Mythology and the larger meanings behind the myths. They are really trying to explain the mysteries of life I think. This is another great graphic novel from First Second. I love this publisher. They do amazing work. this is several stories of Artemis told in the book. I really didn't know the story about the 2 giant stone monsters that threatened to steal her away. It was pretty great. Artemis was ruthless. I did know the story of Orion. The story did a great job of telling it.The are i I adore Mythology and the larger meanings behind the myths. They are really trying to explain the mysteries of life I think. This is another great graphic novel from First Second. I love this publisher. They do amazing work. this is several stories of Artemis told in the book. I really didn't know the story about the 2 giant stone monsters that threatened to steal her away. It was pretty great. Artemis was ruthless. I did know the story of Orion. The story did a great job of telling it.The are is crackling with energy and action. It all is like an old comic with the word Zoom behind them, but the art is so kinetic, you don't need the zoom, the art conveys the action. I will read this whole series. I'm so thankful my library has such a great stock of everything. YEAH Libraries!
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  • Ashley Owens
    January 1, 1970
    Final rating = 3 / 5 stars.I was provided with an electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My biggest issue with this book is that I found I didn't learn anything new about Artemis. Much of this book contained stories or pieces of stories we had read about in the previous volumes. And the stories that were original and individual to Artemis did not really speak to her character very much.I liked the inclusion of Atalanta and Orion. I did not think her origin st Final rating = 3 / 5 stars.I was provided with an electronic ARC of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.My biggest issue with this book is that I found I didn't learn anything new about Artemis. Much of this book contained stories or pieces of stories we had read about in the previous volumes. And the stories that were original and individual to Artemis did not really speak to her character very much.I liked the inclusion of Atalanta and Orion. I did not think her origin story with Leto on the island was necessary, seeing as we learned about it in Apollo's book. And not much time was spent on her personality or what she was like - either as a child or a fully-formed goddess. These issues I had are very similar to the ones I had with Hades' volume. Just an odd choice of story-telling.I did like that the stories were not told from her perspective. I think that made them less biased. I also very much loved the art style & illustrations, and the stories themselves were well-written.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    I am a big fan of George O'Connor's graphic novel take on the Greek gods and goddesses. O'Connor's Artemis is a strong-minded gal that knows what she wants AND SAYS IT. That's certainly what I liked about her! Just be warned that you don't want to cross her! I definitely have included this on my must have classroom books for 2017!
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    I love this series and I've always had a soft spot for the goddess Artemis. This jumped around a bit, but ultimately I still liked it.
  • Celeste_pewter
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a big fan of all things Greek mythology, so I'm always delighted when I discover a new Greek-related series. In ARTEMIS: WILD GODDESS OF THE HUNT, author George O'Connor introduces us to the ethereal and eternal goddess of the hunt. We see how she came to be, and both her friends and foes, as she travails the world, perfecting her skill. O'Connor's work is more Edith Hamilton than Rick Riordan, and it's reflected in some of the truly grim scenarios that some of the gods and goddesses around I'm a big fan of all things Greek mythology, so I'm always delighted when I discover a new Greek-related series. In ARTEMIS: WILD GODDESS OF THE HUNT, author George O'Connor introduces us to the ethereal and eternal goddess of the hunt. We see how she came to be, and both her friends and foes, as she travails the world, perfecting her skill. O'Connor's work is more Edith Hamilton than Rick Riordan, and it's reflected in some of the truly grim scenarios that some of the gods and goddesses around Artemis experience, including public shunning and the loss of one's family. But O'Connor handles it in a graceful way; and never shares more than is necessary, to get the point across. There is actually a mystique to how he chooses to handle it; it encourages readers to figure out and think more deeply about these myths. Though O'Connor does jump around a bit in Artemis's mythology - which may be confusing to someone who are newer to Greek myths - this edition does a great job of giving us a good overall sense of who she and her brother Apollo are, and who she is destined to be. It's enough to send even the youngest of imaginations soaring. All in all, highly recommend, full stop.
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  • David
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 Another great instalment in the series!
  • Margie
    January 1, 1970
    He was an archer, fashioning his own arrows and customizing his bows. Each autumn he would enter the woods before daybreak, waiting and watching. Once I was old enough I would walk with him. Before we got to our spot, light permitting, he taught me the names of trees and plants and their possible uses. He was a man who appreciated nature, learning to understand the signs she offers.This is why for years, as a sport, I would practice with due diligence at straw bales in our back yard, taking the He was an archer, fashioning his own arrows and customizing his bows. Each autumn he would enter the woods before daybreak, waiting and watching. Once I was old enough I would walk with him. Before we got to our spot, light permitting, he taught me the names of trees and plants and their possible uses. He was a man who appreciated nature, learning to understand the signs she offers.This is why for years, as a sport, I would practice with due diligence at straw bales in our back yard, taking the stance, nocking the arrow and pulling back the bow string, steady and sure before the release. Artemis: Wild Goddess Of The Hunt (A Neal Porter Book, First Second, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press, January 31, 2017) written and illustrated by George O'Connor is the ninth volume in his continuing series Olympians. This entry, like the others, will have you turning pages faster than you thought possible; spellbinding from beginning to end. It might have you wanting to begin or continue archery skills.My full recommendation: http://librariansquest.blogspot.com/2...
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  • Marta Boksenbaum
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know why I'm so disappointed. O'Connor writes in his author nite that he saved his favorite gods and goddesses for later in the series, and his favorites seem to overlap with mine. So why am I disappointed? I'm not sure, I just felt like Artemis didn't get a story, he told the whole thing from other people's perspectives. Not sure why I'm giving only 2 stars really.
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  • Marsha
    January 1, 1970
    As the twin sister of Apollo, Artemis is the often underappreciated sibling of the pair. Apollo is the god of music, healing and the arts, subjects to which most people can relate. Artemis is the virgin goddess of the hunt, protector of young women and wanderer of wild places. That makes her odd, a little distant and someone that may be disdained or ignored by men.Her story depicts her as a confident and outspoken goddess, one who knows from the start what she wants from her father Zeus. When sh As the twin sister of Apollo, Artemis is the often underappreciated sibling of the pair. Apollo is the god of music, healing and the arts, subjects to which most people can relate. Artemis is the virgin goddess of the hunt, protector of young women and wanderer of wild places. That makes her odd, a little distant and someone that may be disdained or ignored by men.Her story depicts her as a confident and outspoken goddess, one who knows from the start what she wants from her father Zeus. When she’s a mere tot, she approaches him like a bold child asking Santa for an immense laundry list of all the neat toys she wants for Christmas. What an adorable kid! But the story is told from other viewpoints and they depict the fierce love for her mother that drives her and the thoughts that lie behind some of her more questionable decisions. Like the rest of the gods and goddesses, Artemis isn’t one to suffer slights and her retribution can be terrible and out of all proportion to the offense. However, if you’ve ever been a young woman injured, scorned or attacked by men, you feel for her—just a little—when she insists on remaining inviolate, when she puts her own needs and wants before trivial sexual liaisons or amorous entanglements. For Artemis, no means no and her violence towards those who would presume may answer a secret desire in the hearts of women who wish they could harness such power and force men who would harm them to withdraw permanently from their presences.This story speaks to that longing in the hearts of women and, thus, it may appeal more to the distaff gender than the spear one. But it scores high marks for its story of a goddess untamed, clever, strong, fierce, bold, powerful and an artist with the bow.Mr. O’Connor once again displays his craft in this sympathetic story of a powerful goddess born under difficult circumstances. You come to feel for Artemis, respect her decision, suffer her heartbreak and admire or fear her. He seems to esteem her just as he does the numerous other gods and goddesses whose tales he relates. I’m sure she’ll be the favorite of many a young girl.
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  • Fantasy Literature
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars from Bill, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATUREDisclaimer: just so you know, some of the books we review are received free from publishersArtemis is another in the ongoing series of graphic stories about the Greek gods written and illustrated by George O’Connor. The short version of this review is pretty simple: these works are individually nearly all excellent, and the series as a whole, while absolutely great for young readers (and for teachers of young students), is just as fant 5 stars from Bill, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATUREDisclaimer: just so you know, some of the books we review are received free from publishersArtemis is another in the ongoing series of graphic stories about the Greek gods written and illustrated by George O’Connor. The short version of this review is pretty simple: these works are individually nearly all excellent, and the series as a whole, while absolutely great for young readers (and for teachers of young students), is just as fantastic a read/resource for anyone interested in Greek mythology, regardless of age. One reason is that O’Connor doesn’t simply retell the well-known stories, those we can all recite by heart. Rather he delves into much more obscure aspects of the tales, ensuring that most if not all readers will find something new.rThis holds true for Artemis as well. As one might expect, we hear about Acteon coming across her bathing in the forest and being punished by being transformed into a stag and killed by his own hunting hounds. Niobe’s tears are also here, along with the wooing of Orion (which also gives O’Connor the chance to tell the story of Atalanta as well). But true to form. O’Connor also brings in less popularized stories, such as how Artemis tricked the Aloadae, a pair of monstrous brothers who keep laying siege to Olympus in hopes of carrying off both Artemis and Hera. Even in the oft-told tales though, he offers up a retelling that feels more fresh and often more intimate in the way that it is about character as much as plot. Such is the case for instance of how he tries to manage all the varying versions of how Orion met his end. All of these serve the point of plot (he dies), but the version here, while incorporating several of them, lends it all a poignancy often missing from the other versions....5 stars from Bill, read the full review at FANTASY LITERATURE
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  • Beth Huddleston
    January 1, 1970
    First of all, I want to say that class of 6th graders cannot seem to get enough of this series. I have students constantly pulling these books off my shelf. The artwork is always fantastic and the stories relate-able. As for this book in particular...Artemis can be cruel, but George O'Connor does an excellent job with her backstory to explain why Artemis will not suffer slights of any kind. Like the other books in the Olympians series, this book takes the opportunity to also overlap stories in o First of all, I want to say that class of 6th graders cannot seem to get enough of this series. I have students constantly pulling these books off my shelf. The artwork is always fantastic and the stories relate-able. As for this book in particular...Artemis can be cruel, but George O'Connor does an excellent job with her backstory to explain why Artemis will not suffer slights of any kind. Like the other books in the Olympians series, this book takes the opportunity to also overlap stories in order to give more information for different perspectives. Without giving spoilers, I am going to reference the mythological stories from this book:1. Leto's (Artemis and Apollo's mother) pregnancy and childbirth2. Artemis's childhood and requests for her realms3. the massive deaths of Niobe's children4. Actaeon's transformation to a stag5. Otus and Ephialtes threats on Olympus and ultimate demise6. Orion7. There is a great montage of mythological beasts that Orion hunts down8. AtalantaSo, ultimately, there are a lot of good stories in this book. Unfortunately, Artemis still seems cruel throughout the book since she delivers as many punishments as Athena and Hera. There are some emotional punches thrown in, but I did not feel the same grief in this book as the other two. She has sealed herself off emotionally and it shows.
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  • Ang
    January 1, 1970
    Artemis: Wild Goddess of the Hunt is about Artemis and the first man she loved. The man she loved was Orion, who's own origin is rather unknown (despite one very crazy rumor). Orion was the best hunter (according to himself) and tried as he might to get Artemis' attention. He finally did after he started hunting exotic and rare species. Soon Artemis began to allow him to hunt with her. While their relationship never went past that, she did have feelings for him. But because she is who she is, sh Artemis: Wild Goddess of the Hunt is about Artemis and the first man she loved. The man she loved was Orion, who's own origin is rather unknown (despite one very crazy rumor). Orion was the best hunter (according to himself) and tried as he might to get Artemis' attention. He finally did after he started hunting exotic and rare species. Soon Artemis began to allow him to hunt with her. While their relationship never went past that, she did have feelings for him. But because she is who she is, she wouldn't let herself lose sight and this angered Orion. In his rage Orion threatened to hurt Artemis indirectly, through killing every animal he could find so she could no longer be goddess of the hunt. A bit dramatic, right? And a little obsessive? Well, Artemis couldn't let this happen so she went to her mother Leto. In turn Leto turned to Gaea for help. Despite Leto's efforts to give Artemis some help, it was Apollo who got Artemis to end Orion's quest for destruction. It's sad, but Artemis wouldn't be who she is if she gave in. I enjoyed reading this volume and I'm a fan of Artemis. I would say she is one of my new favorite goddesses. I still love Athena, but Artemis is definitely a new found favorite.
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  • Becky B
    January 1, 1970
    A collection of Greek myth stories about Artemis, her origins, and some of her most famous adventures.As always, O'Connor does an amazing job of weaving all of these tales into a seamless graphic novel. I like Artemis in the Percy Jackson stories so I was looking forward to this one. Evidently Riordan made her a little bit nicer than she was in traditional mythology, because some of these stories are cringeworthy harsh. I know, I really shouldn't be surprised. Characters in Greek myths are all s A collection of Greek myth stories about Artemis, her origins, and some of her most famous adventures.As always, O'Connor does an amazing job of weaving all of these tales into a seamless graphic novel. I like Artemis in the Percy Jackson stories so I was looking forward to this one. Evidently Riordan made her a little bit nicer than she was in traditional mythology, because some of these stories are cringeworthy harsh. I know, I really shouldn't be surprised. Characters in Greek myths are all sorts of messed up. The tale of Apollos and Artemis and Niobe is particularly disturbing. I guess this is a good way to balance out traditional characteristics with some modern retellings. This series remains a great way for upper middle grade and YA readers to learn traditional Greek mythology.Notes on content: One minor swear word. The cautionary tale of Actaeon spying on Artemis and her handmaidens bathing is included. There's some tactful hand, arm, and hair placement to keep the ladies decent despite being naked. Several deaths by arrow on page.
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  • Paula
    January 1, 1970
    This latest title in the “Olympians” graphic series features Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, friend of young girls and protector of women in childbirth. Various characters and even Artemis herself narrate this edition and relate episodes of Artemis’ thrilling and vengeful adventures. The multi-faceted Artemis is fiercely protective of the wild things on earth and equally loyal to her mother, Leto. But even Leto’s plea to Mother Earth cannot keep Artemis from taking the life of her love, Orion, This latest title in the “Olympians” graphic series features Artemis, the goddess of the hunt, friend of young girls and protector of women in childbirth. Various characters and even Artemis herself narrate this edition and relate episodes of Artemis’ thrilling and vengeful adventures. The multi-faceted Artemis is fiercely protective of the wild things on earth and equally loyal to her mother, Leto. But even Leto’s plea to Mother Earth cannot keep Artemis from taking the life of her love, Orion, in the final story. The narrative is straightforward and retains some of the flavor of the original myths. The illustrations are forceful creating a mood of excitement and tension. Back matter includes author’s notes, profile pages on Artemis, Orion, Leto and Atalanta, bibliography and discussion questions. The entire series is a must-have for the graphic or mythology collections.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Although nearly as cruel as her brother Apollo, there are many more things I do love about Artemis, namely: her connection with wild places, her own wildness, her boldness, her cunning, her archery skills, her nocturnalness, her devotion to her mother and the defenseless...Monday girl of the moon. I even got warm hearted toward apollo in this one because of the way family was looking out for each other...tear...siblings...mom. Contains the myth of Orion (which was new to me), Niobe the crying ro Although nearly as cruel as her brother Apollo, there are many more things I do love about Artemis, namely: her connection with wild places, her own wildness, her boldness, her cunning, her archery skills, her nocturnalness, her devotion to her mother and the defenseless...Monday girl of the moon. I even got warm hearted toward apollo in this one because of the way family was looking out for each other...tear...siblings...mom. Contains the myth of Orion (which was new to me), Niobe the crying rock (which now I gotta see), Atalanta (feral girl raised by bears), and an overview of mythical creatures. I think the cheesy jokes are getting more plentiful-not a complaint.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    If I could give this ten stars I would. This one made me laugh loud enough to startle my dog awake more than once. The depiction of Artemis is spot on, even if the crescent moon arrowheads annoy me with their impossibility. The way the story flows is fantastic, and significantly less jerky than many of the previous gods' stories. The narrator changes frequently (watch for the change in the color of the text box if you're having trouble following) but it all blends into a seamless whole. Artemis If I could give this ten stars I would. This one made me laugh loud enough to startle my dog awake more than once. The depiction of Artemis is spot on, even if the crescent moon arrowheads annoy me with their impossibility. The way the story flows is fantastic, and significantly less jerky than many of the previous gods' stories. The narrator changes frequently (watch for the change in the color of the text box if you're having trouble following) but it all blends into a seamless whole. Artemis retains her agency, unlike many of the passed down versions of the myths that try to push her into something one dimensional or cast her as just not having met the right man yet.
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  • Kara
    January 1, 1970
    Most of the narration is from others' perspective and we don't get Artemis' POV narration until the very end, which is the weakest part of this retelling. I wanted to hear HER voice - not her know-it-all family. However, when the narration drops away and we just have characters actually talking and taking action, then the story is AWESOME - action filled and ancient and fresh and poignant and funny and tragic and, once again, a wonderful retelling of the old myths from a new angle by O'Connor.
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  • Stephen Snyder
    January 1, 1970
    Another thoroughly research, beautifully illustrated, and wonderful retelling of Greek mythology by George O'Connor. What a clever way to teach Greek mythology. It helps the reader by putting a face to a name and to help keep the characters straight. Kudos on a job well done Mr. O'Connor.Thank you for the loan Franklin Public Library.
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  • Zoe (readabilitea)
    January 1, 1970
    The author says in his note at the end that Artemis is one of his favourites and I think you can really tell that he loves her - you can also see, compared to one of the earlier volumes e.g. Hera, that the artwork is better and more polished. Again, I learnt so much from this and it was such an enjoyable read, I can't wait to read more of the series!
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  • Chelsey
    January 1, 1970
    Artemis has long been my favorite goddess, but I also have not typically enjoyed O'Connor's Olympians series, so it makes sense that this was a very middle-of-the-road book for me. The individuals myths/stories suffer from a lack of flow, and while I did very much enjoy the ending with Atalanta, Artemis, Orion, and Apollo, this was just meh.
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  • Jason
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best in the series by far! A bit darker and sadder than the others. I'd always had a fondness for Artemis but this has made her one of my favorites. She's a good role model for girls in that she knows what she wants and marches to her own beat. O'Connor did a great job with this one.
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  • Nicole Harris
    January 1, 1970
    The artwork style and coloring for this series is fantastic - realistic enough to get the point across about what happens in the story without being outright disturbing. A balance that I deeply appreciate.
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    I think the nice artwork could have been used on a better story.
  • Katherine Rue
    January 1, 1970
    As a Classics nerd I love a good retelling of Greek and Roman myths. George O'Connor does a great job, and the art is excellent. Can't wait to see who he does next. PS, he's a good feminist.
  • Avery
    January 1, 1970
    Love this. One of my favorites in the series.
  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    As good as the rest of the series!
  • Myra
    January 1, 1970
    A nice, solid retelling of the story of Artemis. Good artwork, easy to read.
  • Lisa Day
    January 1, 1970
    The illustrators were good, the story was good. I realize I don't like Artemis herself. Yikes.
  • Caleb
    January 1, 1970
    Not the best book
  • Rod Brown
    January 1, 1970
    Another solid entry in a very reliable series.