Educated
An unforgettable memoir in the tradition of The Glass Castle about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge UniversityTara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills bag.” In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father’s junkyard.Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent.Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. She taught herself enough mathematics and grammar to be admitted to Brigham Young University, where she studied history, learning for the first time about important world events like the Holocaust and the civil rights movement. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge. Only then would she wonder if she’d traveled too far, if there was still a way home.Educated is an account of the struggle for self-invention. It is a tale of fierce family loyalty, and of the grief that comes with severing the closest of ties. With the acute insight that distinguishes all great writers, Westover has crafted a universal coming-of-age story that gets to the heart of what an education is and what it offers: the perspective to see one’s life through new eyes, and the will to change it.

Educated Details

TitleEducated
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2018
PublisherRandom House
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Autobiography, Memoir

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Educated Review

  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    She was the youngest of seven, one sister, five brothers. Raised on a mountain top in Idsho, by a survivalist father and midwife mother . Of the Mormon religion, her father preached the coming of the end days, intrusion by the government, built a bomb shelter, stockpiled fuel, food, guns. He ruled with an iron fist, the word of God and the family fell in line. Though there was another factor in her father's psyche that she wouldn't understand or figure out until much later. There were no doctor She was the youngest of seven, one sister, five brothers. Raised on a mountain top in Idsho, by a survivalist father and midwife mother . Of the Mormon religion, her father preached the coming of the end days, intrusion by the government, built a bomb shelter, stockpiled fuel, food, guns. He ruled with an iron fist, the word of God and the family fell in line. Though there was another factor in her father's psyche that she wouldn't understand or figure out until much later. There were no doctor visits, no immunizations, no formal schooling, no friends other than family, so many things not allowed. They were in effect totally off the grid. Yet, somehow this young woman manages to educate herself, pull herself out of the morass of the paranoia her father fed on and used to control the family.When I read books like these, people despite all odds to the contrary that manage to overcome so much adversity and rise to meet and supercede lives challenges, I am awed. The things one reads in this book are unbelievable, difficult to assimilate, and yet they happened. The struggles that Tara had to overcome are written without excess emotion, though in her words you do realize just how hard this struggle was and is still. Her journey, not without many steps back, at times literally tore her apart. I always wonder why and how some people are able to pull themselves out and above these situations, while some cannot, as is apparent in her own family. Where do they find their strength of will? My first five star read of the year, and I have nothing but admiration and respect for this young woman, who is a formidable person indeed. I hope she continues to find the peace she needs, and is able to resolve her relationship with her family.ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    EDUCATEDTara WestoverMY RATING ⭐⭐⭐⭐▫PUBLISHER Random HousePUBLISHED February 20, 2018A gripping, heartbreaking memoir of a woman who, against all odds, overcomes immense family obstacles to gain an education, opening her eyes to a world she never knew existed. SUMMARYTARA WESTOVER never went to school, never saw a doctor and did not have a birth certificate. Her parents were Idaho survivalists, and wanted nothing to do with the government, schools or hospitals. She and her six brothers and one s EDUCATEDTara WestoverMY RATING ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️▫️PUBLISHER Random HousePUBLISHED February 20, 2018A gripping, heartbreaking memoir of a woman who, against all odds, overcomes immense family obstacles to gain an education, opening her eyes to a world she never knew existed. SUMMARYTARA WESTOVER never went to school, never saw a doctor and did not have a birth certificate. Her parents were Idaho survivalists, and wanted nothing to do with the government, schools or hospitals. She and her six brothers and one sister lived off the land. Her mother was a midwife and healer and treated every family malady—cuts, burns, broken bones, and head trauma— with herbs and oils. At age 10, Tara is put to work savaging scrap metal from her father’s junkyard, a dangerous job with no consideration to safety. When one of Tara’s older brother becomes physical and mentally abusive to her, her parents turn a blind eye. At fifteen, Tara begins educating herself. She learned enough math and grammar to pass the ACT and be admitted to Brigham Young University at the age of 17. There she studied history and learned of events such as the civil right movement and the Holocaust for the first time. From Brigham Young her quest continued at Cambridge and Harvard, ultimately earning a PhD at the age of 27. Throughout her education Tara Westover experiences tremendous conflict between the awareness she gained from her education and her loyalty to her family.REVIEWMy experience in reading EDUCATED was not without its own conflicts. This hard to forget story is both maddening and heartbreaking. It is both gripping and difficult to read. I wanted to reach out and shake Tara out of her silence of the torment and abuse she suffered. I wanted to put my arm around her and give her the confidence to yell and scream at those holding her down. I wanted to tell her to get out, and not to go back home again. She touched me with this book, and I hope it will be the salve she needs to heal. Perhaps she has finally found her voice. It’s truly amazing what Tara has been able to accomplish. My hat is off to her. I hope that someday she realizes the fault is not and was never with her. A father is suppose to protect and keep his children out of harms way, Tara’s did not. A mother is supposed to love and educate her children, Tara’s did not. A big brother is suppose to look out for his little sister. Tara’s did not. But now she’s educated and hopefully will break the cycle of abuse, denial and most of all, silence. Thanks to Netgalley, Random House and Tara Westover for a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    Knowledge is power and Educated is a powerful memoir.
  • Lolly K Dandeneau
    January 1, 1970
    via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/“There’s a world out there, Tara,” he said. “And it will look a lot different once Dad is no longer whispering his view of it in your ear.”The above quote is true, in a sense, for all children but more so in certain families. This was one of the most captivating memoirs I have ever read. Ideas can be dangerous, and children are nothing if not always at the mercy of their parents. They are our Gods, they rule the universe until we are able to ful via my blog: https://bookstalkerblog.wordpress.com/“There’s a world out there, Tara,” he said. “And it will look a lot different once Dad is no longer whispering his view of it in your ear.”The above quote is true, in a sense, for all children but more so in certain families. This was one of the most captivating memoirs I have ever read. Ideas can be dangerous, and children are nothing if not always at the mercy of their parents. They are our Gods, they rule the universe until we are able to fully think and decide for ourselves, but how do you do that when you’ve been conditioned? What about being kept out of school, taught to distrust everyone that doesn’t share your parents beliefs? Here is the truth, when your world is small and contained you are so much easier to control, to manipulate. Maybe all parents poison the minds of their children with their ideology, often not meaning too. We can’t be right all the time, and aren’t as progressive as we imagine. Every parent has allowed their prejudices to bleed into their children, well meaning or not- born out of fear or from horrible experience that colored our thoughts and those things can wreak havoc for life on our children, carried well into adulthood. How do we purge the rot and nurture the seeds of good our parents have placed inside of us? As with all of us, Tara Westover spent much of her life sifting through her education, life lessons, religious beliefs, etc. A child of survivalists, believing the end of times is always around the corner, forced to prep endlessly, that the rest of the world is full of sin, forbidden to be seen or treated by doctors (because God and nature heals, not man) barred from school (because it’s brainwashing) her father is first and foremost a faithful servant of God. Early on he has episodes, everyone must fall in line to his demands, even her mother forced into midwifery and healing. Her brother is brutally abusive, and abuse is something no one really understands until they’ve lived through it. Good, Bad… how do you make that separation with nothing to compare it to? You can only dissect things with what you are aware of, what do you do when it’s been drilled into you that all you can trust is your family, forced to view the entire world as ominous and evil?Tara, of course has an inborn feeling of right and wrong and an intelligence beyond what is ‘acceptable’ but there is a struggle with religion and the love she feels for her family. While her father has spent his life sure the rest of the world is a threat, out to brainwash godly people he himself is guilty of such. Be it an unamed illness in him or manical faith, a label changes nothing when behavior is enabled and beyond anyone’s control. Yes, any sane person would be horrified by the things she and her siblings were forced to do, things even strong grown men would be hardpressed to take on, and why does she see it through? Because parents are in control, there is no other option, and later to protect others. It does dawn on her that her life is hardscrabble and brutal, and as quoted above, when one of her brothers seeks a different way of life and escapes (which is a mean feat) she finds her own way out.Being out is a loaded thing too. Chosing anything other than the life her father has mapped out for his children is to be excommunicated! It’s siblings having to chose sides, it’s relying solely on oneself. Tara is one hell of a strong woman, and the madness of it is her parents, in all their outrageous expectations and teachings still are a part of the reason she turned out the way she did. What a thing to chew on! We become, either in spite of or because of, don’t we. We discard what’s been forced upon us, embrace it, or ulter it until the fit is right. Even the most horrific of things we have survived are a part of our evolution, so to speak.Tara loves her parents, there is no doubt but that doesn’t mean she can’t see their flaws. It’s a miracle anyone survived her father and his ideas, and her mother- because she allowed it, she took part in it. The dizzying moments come when things do turn out, when her parents have success or share a scrap of tenderness, that’s the confusion for her. Surely, if they are right about this than maybe she is the bad one?I can’t even begin to do justice to this memoir, it’s so hard to review them anyway as you feel like you have someone’s life in your hands, such an over-exaggeration I know, but really, this is a raw account of Tara Westover’s heartbreaking and inspiring struggle to free herself. Do not be fooled by the cover, it isn’t just about education nor off the grid survivalists and religion. I couldn’t put it down, and spent so much time collecting flies with my mouth gaping open in shock. There is a lingering sadness inside of me, even for her brother whom wronged Tara in so many ways, and that is how it is for her.I could write paragraphs about everything I felt and thought along the journey of this memoir, but the best I can do is tell others to read it! I hope there is another book one day, she is someone you long to check in on, that you’re rooting for. I don’t think I could have found my way as she found hers, it takes courage and something more that so many of us are missing. It’s so much easier to play possum and just accept the devil you know, but I kept hearing ‘pull yourself up by your bootstraps’ and ‘rely on yourself’. She sure did!Yes, a must read for 2018!Publication Date: February 20, 2018Random House
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  • Jennifer Blankfein
    January 1, 1970
    Follow my reviews on booknationbyjen.wordpress.com The author’s coming of age in Educated is incredible, tragic, praiseworthy and monumental. From a young girl loving and believing everything her parents tell her to questioning their logic and actively pursuing different answers and other ways of thinking, Tara Westover has the inherent desire to know more. Reminiscent of The Glass Castle, Tara lives with her survivalist family in the mountains of Idaho, and similar to Leah Remini’s account of h Follow my reviews on booknationbyjen.wordpress.com The author’s coming of age in Educated is incredible, tragic, praiseworthy and monumental. From a young girl loving and believing everything her parents tell her to questioning their logic and actively pursuing different answers and other ways of thinking, Tara Westover has the inherent desire to know more. Reminiscent of The Glass Castle, Tara lives with her survivalist family in the mountains of Idaho, and similar to Leah Remini’s account of her time as a scientologist in Troublemaker, Tara begins to realize all she is told may not be the truth and although she is fiercely loyal to her parents and siblings she feels trapped and begins to question their nonconventional, way of life.Growing up working in a junkyard with her dad, helping her mom with her herbs and fighting off her violent brother, it is shocking, admirable and hopeful to hear about Tara’s experiences as she takes the initiative to study her way to a decent grade on the ACT, ultimately getting herself in to college and beyond. Growing up with some mormon values, anti-government, no schooling, never visited a doctor, and spending days preparing for the end of the world, her naivety is expected but concurrently astounding; she had never taken a test before, didn’t understand a reading assignment of a chapter meant you needed to actually read the words on the pages, had no idea what the Holocaust was; she had virtually no knowledge of the world outside of her family, the mountain and what her parents told her.Westover’s account was enriched with surprisingly intelligent, sophisticated and well written prose. (I kept thinking how she never went to school until college and how for me, in the world I live in, formal education in the formative years seems crucial at the time children are developing. Clearly one can catch up on reading and writing skills and learn curriculum later on, but the social interaction, independence and decision making tactics we learn in a school environment, providing experiences, may be more important.) Her devotion and loyalty to her large family, her abusive brother and her controlling father in particular, caused personal conflict and forced Tara to make painful decisions which allowed her to flourish but continued to leave her with questions.“When I was a child, I waited for my mind to grow, for my experiences to accumulate and my choices to solidify, taking shape into the likeness of a person. That person, or that likeness of one, had belonged. I was of that mountain, the mountain that had made me. It was only as I grew older that I wondered if how I had started is how I would end – if the first shape a person takes is their only true shape.”Tara takes us through the complexity of her relationships, and when thinking about her father and his strength and conviction as a leader of the family, it makes me think, aside from his mental illness, he came from a place of love. We all work with what we have, and if what we have is limited and we are not open to learning more, we can appear to be stubborn and ill informed, making poor choices. An open mind and a thirst for learning can bring people together, enlighten and revitalize. A small mind with no will to become more educated and hear other opinions can lead to either submission (drinking the Kool Aid) or conflict and rebellion. Tara loved her parents and as she became educated, she was able to see their small mindedness and unfortunately that disparity broke them apart.Educated is a powerful account of Tara Westover’s life, from living as a survivalist on a mountain in Idaho to attending Bringham Young University, Harvard and Cambridge and earning a PhD. She is extremely accomplished and a wonderful writer. Educated is available February 20th.
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  • Mary Lange
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars– a beautiful, heartbreaking and ultimately hopeful and redemptive tale of perseverance, and the power of education. Westover writes about the difficult things– mental illness, domestic abuse– with clarity and understanding, but also with deep compassion. I still cannot believe this is the work of a debut author, and I find myself pressing my copy into the hands of any/everyone who will listen. A half a star subtracted from an otherwise perfect score simply because the first third took 4.5 stars– a beautiful, heartbreaking and ultimately hopeful and redemptive tale of perseverance, and the power of education. Westover writes about the difficult things– mental illness, domestic abuse– with clarity and understanding, but also with deep compassion. I still cannot believe this is the work of a debut author, and I find myself pressing my copy into the hands of any/everyone who will listen. A half a star subtracted from an otherwise perfect score simply because the first third took me a bit longer to piece through, but once the stage had been set, I tore through the rest of this incredible story in record time. For fans of The Glass Castle, this is a must must must. (Some difficult topics regarding domestic abuse especially– if this is a trigger for you, I’d gently recommend you approach this one with caution, or simply stay away.)
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  • Willa
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book. I want to re-read it when it comes out. When I heard about certain moments and memories that Tara shares in this book before I had read it, I thought that the book would be interesting to read in those spaces of the extremes. I thought this will be little too outrageous, perhaps a little ridiculous. What I thought it was going to be was completely off base. Yes, the story shares some of Tara's memories that you might not think possible, but when you read it, her memories are g I loved this book. I want to re-read it when it comes out. When I heard about certain moments and memories that Tara shares in this book before I had read it, I thought that the book would be interesting to read in those spaces of the extremes. I thought this will be little too outrageous, perhaps a little ridiculous. What I thought it was going to be was completely off base. Yes, the story shares some of Tara's memories that you might not think possible, but when you read it, her memories are grounded and echo experiences shared by all women. The relationship between her father, religion, and his mental illness affected the ways in which the males in her family interacted with her, her sister, and her mom. Though my life barely resembles hers in upbringing and even events that occurred, I could relate and see the same behaviors of my father's wife deferring to him about everything and him expecting that from her. Or the games some men play of testing their control over their girlfriends and wives.
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  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    It's September of 2017 as I write this, and yet I already know that in "Educated" I've found a book that will make my best of 2018 list. A good memoir takes you into a place that you don't know and shows you around; an exceptional one grabs you and doesn't let go until you feel like the author's singular story is universal. Tara Westover's childhood growing up on a mountain in Idaho with dangerously devout Mormon parents and brothers is not one I recognize. That she never stepped foot in a class It's September of 2017 as I write this, and yet I already know that in "Educated" I've found a book that will make my best of 2018 list. A good memoir takes you into a place that you don't know and shows you around; an exceptional one grabs you and doesn't let go until you feel like the author's singular story is universal. Tara Westover's childhood growing up on a mountain in Idaho with dangerously devout Mormon parents and brothers is not one I recognize. That she never stepped foot in a classroom until she incredibly enrolled in college and ultimately found herself earning a PhD from Harvard is confounding. The abuse leveled at her from her family - from neglect, from physically dangerous workplaces when she wasn't even yet a teenager, from misguided religious fervor, from emotional torment - is terrifying. This book grapples with the equal parts love and fear she has for her siblings and parents, and with the questions of what one has to be willing to sacrifice to become a fully realized person. It's a memoir that you would never believe if it were fiction; it's a memoir I will sell hand over fist come February.
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  • Marika
    January 1, 1970
    This *can't put down* book is a mashup of The Glass Castle and Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?" The author grew up in an abusive home and whose father practiced his own brand of Mormonism. When you grow up so isolated you begin to think that what you are witnessing is normal. But abuse is never normal and Tara Westover has written a brilliant memoir on how her soul and eyes were opened. Highly recommend.I read a review copy and was not compensated.
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  • Milka
    January 1, 1970
    Educated by Tara Westover was one of my most anticipated releases of 2018 and it definitely did not disappoint.Tara Westover's memoir is filled with interesting family stories, heartbreak, resilience, strength, and much more. It is both touching and thought-provoking, personal yet universal. Tara Westover, Ph.D., was seventeen years old when she first set foot in a traditional classroom. Educated in an unconventional homeschooling system (unconventional in the sense that there really was no enco Educated by Tara Westover was one of my most anticipated releases of 2018 and it definitely did not disappoint.Tara Westover's memoir is filled with interesting family stories, heartbreak, resilience, strength, and much more. It is both touching and thought-provoking, personal yet universal. Tara Westover, Ph.D., was seventeen years old when she first set foot in a traditional classroom. Educated in an unconventional homeschooling system (unconventional in the sense that there really was no encouragement for her to study in the first place) Tara never really imagined her to be a person who would fit into a traditional school environment.Her future felt very pre-determined for her -- marrying early, giving birth to children, assisting her mother with her midwife-business or her father with his many business endeavors. When one of Tara's brothers moves away from home to attend university against their parents' wishes, Tara begins to think that there might be a possibility for her to escape her pre-determined future as well. It was so interesting, yet kind of terrifying, to read about Tara's childhood and the things that she has to witness living in a family that does not believe in government organized education or in the assistance of trained physicians and nurses. Seeing her mother suffer from brain injury and not getting help from the doctors or seeing her brother burned and scarred leaves a mark that she is probably never able to fully erase.Tara's father is one of the most interesting "characters" to read about. The synopsis calls him survivalist, which I guess is true to an extent since he does prepare for the end of the world. I find it interesting, though, that the synopsis does not really mention the religious aspects of Tara's father believes at all. Maybe the publisher thinks a mention of religion could drive some readers away. I personally had read about this book from elsewhere and knew about the religious content before picking this one up.Tara's family attends church services at the local Mormon church but according to her father, they seem to be the only true believers in their community. His religious believes are the reason he doesn't want his children to go to a government-owned school or to a hospital. If an accident happens, according to him it was the wish of God. I am not a religious person at all which is why I find it extremely difficult to understand Tara's father's reasoning. His decisions made me consider how I would act in situations the family finds itself in and though I did not relate to Tara's father in any way, I found it extremely intriguing to read about him. His decisions and actions definitely have left a mark not only on himself but on all the members of his family as well.The violence Tara has to witness and personally go through in her home was angering and heartbreaking. The status of women in her community is horrible and painful to read about. Getting to witness how Tara's perception of herself and what she has gone through changes as she spends time away from home is extremely interesting and brilliantly executed. The more time she spends away the more she starts to realize that what has happened to her since her childhood is not normal or deserved. It is the result of toxic masculinity and age-old gender stereotypes. Tara's educational journey is so inspirational and highlights her personal strength. The way she is able to, slowly but surely, get acclimated to this whole new world for her is described brilliantly. I constantly found myself rooting for her and wishing for all the best. Finding her areas of academic interest and questioning things she has been taught in her home takes time, but once she gets a chance to make her own mind it is proved that her ideas are original, brilliant and worth examining. All of the academic research she mentions in the book sounds like something I would love to get my hands on.Westover is a strong writer and is able to piece her story together in a way that makes the reader want to keep turning the pages. Though I was not able to relate to her family background, her struggles at university and finding her way in the academic world were issues which made me think about my own university years. While I believe those who can relate to Tara's family and educational background are in minority within the readership of this book, I believe her universal story about the struggles of growing up in an unconventional environment, finding her way on her own, and making decisions against her parents' wishes are issues many readers can identify with.I highly recommend Educated to everyone and hope that this was only the beginning of Tara Westover's writing career.
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  • Renata
    January 1, 1970
    This is a little hard for me to rate because I certainly am very moved by Tara Westover's journey and have a huge amount of respect for everything she overcame. This is a great book for reading and muttering "wow that's fucked up" to yourself.That said, it's hard for me not to compare this negatively to The Glass Castle--they're both somewhat similar stories of very difficult childhoods with charismatic but unstable fathers--but The Glass Castle is so beautifully written, and this is more a stra This is a little hard for me to rate because I certainly am very moved by Tara Westover's journey and have a huge amount of respect for everything she overcame. This is a great book for reading and muttering "wow that's fucked up" to yourself.That said, it's hard for me not to compare this negatively to The Glass Castle--they're both somewhat similar stories of very difficult childhoods with charismatic but unstable fathers--but The Glass Castle is so beautifully written, and this is more a straightforward listing of events. Again--the events are extremely compelling and I have nothing but respect for Tara and her journey. Her story does make you think about education and what pieces of knowledge we tend to take for granted. (When Tara went to college, she raised her hand in a class and asked what the Holocaust was, because she genuinely did not know. I also appreciated the way she unpacked the systematic way the things left out of her extremely spotty homeschool education were designed to uphold racist/sexist/otherwise oppressive viewpoints.)I'd definitely recommend it to people who are drawn to stories of fundamentalism/doomsday prepping etc, and also perhaps to educators.
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  • JennE
    January 1, 1970
    I'd like to thank NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for making this copy of Educated available. All opinions are my own.The Glass Castle meets Gap Creek and earns a PhD.Can I give this six stars?? More in-depth review to come.UPDATE: It took me about a week or so to digest and live in the words of this book and the incredible story of Tara Westover growing up with extremist parents that were against all things "unnatural" and how she eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge.If you are ha I'd like to thank NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for making this copy of Educated available. All opinions are my own.The Glass Castle meets Gap Creek and earns a PhD.Can I give this six stars?? More in-depth review to come.UPDATE: It took me about a week or so to digest and live in the words of this book and the incredible story of Tara Westover growing up with extremist parents that were against all things "unnatural" and how she eventually earned a PhD from Cambridge.If you are having a bad day or a pity party, read this book. If you are having financial problems, read this book. If you think you can't make it another day, read this book. If you think your job is miserable, read this book. Tara Westover grew up at the base of a mountain in Idaho within a Mormon family with six siblings and a mother and a father. However, she didn't receive much parenting as a child. Her father was a strict enforcer of Bible verses and her mother deferred all decisions to him. When her mother acted as a mid-wife, (because her father thought it would be a good idea) Tara became the assistant. When her father needed assistance with pulling and throwing scrap metal, Tara and her brothers were the employees.I'm no wimp and certainly not afraid of work, but the extreme and and incredulously unsafe practices of this family living "off the grid" kept me predicting someone's certain death. From car wrecks with brain injuries to motorcycle accidents to second degree burns, all ailments were treated with tonics, poultices and herbal oils. Anything associated with the government was off limits, which meant, school, doctors, hospitals, laws, taxes, Pell grants, etc...When her father hears of the nearby Ruby Ridge siege, Tara and her brothers have to prepare, and sleep with a "head for the hills"bag.When one of her older brothers defies his upbringing and goes on to college, he encourages Tara to do the same. At the age of 16, she takes the ACT test, fails, then teachers herself trigonometry to earn an acceptable score to attend BYU. At 17, she becomes a freshman at BYU, alienates her classmates and roommates with her "strange clothes" and "strict beliefs." Thankfully, a professor takes interest in her, senses her determination and helps Tara adjust as well as find ways to further her education.This book probably could have been twice its length, but Westover has chosen just the right events and woven them seamlessly into a page turner quest for a different life. Through her experiences, she takes the reader with her as she revisits her life through physical abuse, poverty, survivalist and religious beliefs, her exclusion by some of her family and her determination to overcome it all.Educated should be a must-read for teachers, students and anyone. Gillian Anderson is right, "You can do anything you set your mind to, but it takes action, perseverance and facing your fears." Tara Westover's story is this quote in living color. #Netgalley #Educated
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    Just. Wow. No words, but I'll try. This was a moving, incredible story (as in, superbly written, raw, and full of events that strained my belief) about a woman who was raised in a strict, abusive, misogynistic, paranoid survivalist/conspiracist family whose children were not allowed to attend any school or ever be treated by doctors. She was 16/17 when she passed college admissions exams and began attending university classes (the first time she ever went to school, I believe). I went snooping i Just. Wow. No words, but I'll try. This was a moving, incredible story (as in, superbly written, raw, and full of events that strained my belief) about a woman who was raised in a strict, abusive, misogynistic, paranoid survivalist/conspiracist family whose children were not allowed to attend any school or ever be treated by doctors. She was 16/17 when she passed college admissions exams and began attending university classes (the first time she ever went to school, I believe). I went snooping immediately after I finished it and came across an interview with the author. This is a direct quote from her: "We think about education as a stepping stone into a higher socio-economic class, into a better job. And it does do those things. But I don't think that's what it really is. I experienced it as getting access to different ideas and perspectives and using them to construct my own mind. An education is not so much about making a living, as making a person." And that's pretty much what I took from the book. It’s the story of her internal struggle to escape the mind-warping beliefs she’d been indoctrinated with since birth. It's going to be almost impossible to top it this year.Thanks to Random House and NetGalley for an advanced reader's copy. #Educated #NetGalley
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  • McKenzie
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know how to talk about this book yet. I've tried to explain how moved I was while reading it. How proud I am of Tara's journey so far, though we've never met. How haunted I feel by what she went through, and by the echoes of her experiences in my own life. I called my dad this morning, to thank him for raising me not just to value my education, but to pursue it. To chase after it. I can't keep the tears out of my eyes and I can't praise Educated highly enough.
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  • Shannon A
    January 1, 1970
    Tara's extraordinary experience is akin to a bittersweet love letter to the past. I have devoured every page in utter awe.A nearly unbelievable, astonishing & beautifully raw account of a life lived off the grid.
  • Kathi
    January 1, 1970
    Love love love. I can't wait to re - read this when it comes out. I have so many conflicting emotions and thoughts about this family and their relationships and I don't understand much about this culture and religion and way of life, but my goodness was I drawn in unbelievably fast.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    "I am only seven, but I understand that it is this fact, more than any other, that makes my family different: we don't go to school."Tara Westover begins her memoir with this fact. It's typical of the book: not written in soaring prose, but stated factually. We learn much more about her upbringing. Her fundamentalist Mormon family is extreme in the extreme -- the family lives on a mountain, and Dad rules the roost in every way. He fears the government (the kids don't have birth certificates and "I am only seven, but I understand that it is this fact, more than any other, that makes my family different: we don't go to school."Tara Westover begins her memoir with this fact. It's typical of the book: not written in soaring prose, but stated factually. We learn much more about her upbringing. Her fundamentalist Mormon family is extreme in the extreme -- the family lives on a mountain, and Dad rules the roost in every way. He fears the government (the kids don't have birth certificates and the family doesn't visit doctors, even when they are horrifically burned or when they are badly hurt in car accidents). He prepares the family for the "end of days" and preaches to them about the evils of the Illuminati: "I spent my summers bottling peaches and my winters rotating supplies. When the World of Men failed, my family would continue on, unaffected."And of course, Dad doesn't believe in the kids attending school. Instead, Mom "home schools" them, although this amounts to little. Tara remembers paging through a math book. She decides to count each page her fingers touch as studied, so when her mom asks her how many pages she has completed, she answers "Fifty." Her mom is proud and exclaims over how she could never make that kind of progress in public schools."Normal" to Tara consists of this type of schooling, and of working at her dad's junkyard. It's only later that her "understanding would shift, part of (her) heavy swing into adulthood."Her older brother, Tyler, decides to buck the family's rules and attend college. His parents are not happy: "College is extra school for people too dumb to learn the first time around," her dad says. However, Tyler tells Tara about how much he enjoys learning: "There's a world out there, Tara, and it will look a lot different once Dad is no longer whispering his view of it in your ear."Tara decides to take the ACT and try to get into college herself. First she has to find a math book and do months of study, but she does get a high enough score to get in. She is totally a fish out of water there, not knowing about the Holocaust or many other historical events that pretty much everyone else grew up knowing. She is appalled at the wardrobe of many of the girls (and this is at Brigham Young, a conservative school), having been taught by her dad that a "righteous woman never shows anything above her ankles."Throughout the book, one thing that puzzled and frustrated me was now supportive Tara's mom was of her dad, at the expense of her children. In some ways, she tries to help Tara escape and go to school. But ultimately, she stays loyal to her husband even when it means writing Tara out of her life. I understand that she has been brainwashed by him (as Tara was as a child, and as many of her siblings still are), but still, it was maddening. To this day, when Tara has contacted her mom to see if she can visit her, Mom refuses, unless Dad can come along as well. "Dad had always been a hard man -- a man who knew the truth on every subject and wasn't interested in what anybody else had to say. We listened to him, never the other way around: when he was not speaking, he required silence."And Dad is a mess. Tara learns at some point about bipolar disorder, and it opens up a whole new level of understanding to her: this describes her dad's behavior exactly. Of course, given his beliefs, seeing a doctor or taking any type of medication is unthinkable. Heaven help the family when he gets riled up (which is often). "The Lord has called me to testify," he says to Tara at one point. "He is displeased. You have cast aside His blessings to whore after man's knowledge. His wrath is stirred against you. It will not be long in coming."After a shaky start, Tara goes on to succeed wildly in the academic world, studying at Cambridge and Harvard, and having now earned her PhD (interestingly, she and three of her siblings have all earned PhD's, while the other three still live with the parents and have never attended school). Yet her parents, particularly her dad, still seem oblivious. "It proves one thing at least," her dad says at a graduation. "Our home school is as good as any public education."Tara is hugely conflicted throughout the book. She loves learning and the "real" world, while being understandably still pulled toward the family that was her entire world as she grew up. Once a friend asks if she is angry that her parents didn't put her in school. "It was an advantage!" she shouts, realizing as she says it that she's speaking from instinct. Her friend answers, "Well, I'm angry, even if you aren't."And I felt angry as I read this book as well. It's hard to read -- like "Glass Castle" but harsher -- and it always annoys me when a family is abusive under the cover of religion, thereby turning the kids off to God in the process (Tara doesn't mention her faith these days, but I'm pretty sure she doesn't attend church).Ironically, the family's off-the-grid lifestyle has ended up serving them well. They started an herbal business ("a spiritual alternative to Obamacare") that now earns them hundreds of thousands each year.This is a book that will stay with you for a long time. It will make you think. Highly recommended.
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  • Eleanor
    January 1, 1970
    Tara Westover was raised in Idaho, the daughter of fundamentalist Mormon parents, in the wake of the tragic events at Ruby Ridge. Her father decreed that anything to do with the government was sinful, and kept Tara and her siblings from school and from access to medical care. Her mother, an herbalist and midwife, chose to be helpless to protect her children from his rages and turned a blind eye to the physical and emotional abuse one of Tara's brothers visited on Tara and her siblings. As become Tara Westover was raised in Idaho, the daughter of fundamentalist Mormon parents, in the wake of the tragic events at Ruby Ridge. Her father decreed that anything to do with the government was sinful, and kept Tara and her siblings from school and from access to medical care. Her mother, an herbalist and midwife, chose to be helpless to protect her children from his rages and turned a blind eye to the physical and emotional abuse one of Tara's brothers visited on Tara and her siblings. As becomes increasingly clear in this riveting memoir, Tara's father and brother both suffer(ed) from undiagnosed mental illness, but because Tara truly didn't have exposure to anything else in her formative years, it was just her normal.Another of her brothers, who did have some education and a bigger world view, recognizes Tara's undeniable intelligence, and encourages her to teach herself enough to take and pass the ACT. She is 16 years old when she does and her ticket out is secured--she is offered a scholarship to Brigham Young University. Her time there is not easy; a child who has never set foot in a classroom, whose only historical perspective is what was fed to her by parents who shunned all versions of the world and history but their own, has an enormous row to hoe. That she finds her roommates, who are fellow Mormons, to be uncomfortably worldly is testament to the rigorous and unforgiving standards under which she was raised. Tara's determination to work out a way to succeed despite setbacks of nearly Biblical proportions is tangible, and the reader can do naught but root for her.Despite leaving home, despite years of higher education at BYU, Oxford, Cambridge, and Harvard, Tara remains emotionally tethered to her own history, influenced by the judgmental battering she takes from her father and brother, and unconvinced of her worthiness to live the life she now has without feeling like an imposter. Education has the emotional percussion of Jeannette Walls' The Glass Castle Mary Karr's The Liar's Club. Highly, highly recommended. I received a free download of this book from Random House, through NetGalley. Publication date is February 2018.
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  • Meag McKeron
    January 1, 1970
    I'm still trying to wrap my mind around this book. When you see the title "Educated," you automatically think "school," but by the end of Tara's memoir, the word holds much more weight. Life experiences, valuable role models and mentors, and constant self-discovery all contribute to a person's education, and no one's path to becoming educated is the same. Tara's unconventional path is a testament to that and should give hope to anyone who feels like taking control of their life is impossible.Tar I'm still trying to wrap my mind around this book. When you see the title "Educated," you automatically think "school," but by the end of Tara's memoir, the word holds much more weight. Life experiences, valuable role models and mentors, and constant self-discovery all contribute to a person's education, and no one's path to becoming educated is the same. Tara's unconventional path is a testament to that and should give hope to anyone who feels like taking control of their life is impossible.Tara's story is a truly remarkable one - until the age of 16, she had no formal education and was living in a house mostly cut off from the modern world due to her strict Mormon upbringing and her controlling father. When she decides to escape her mentally and physically abusing home and go to college, Tara must learn how the world really functions outside of the bubble that was Buck Peak, Idaho and try to reconcile her sheltered and sometimes traumatizing upbringing with what she missed out on growing up.I really enjoyed Tara's writing style. This is a heavy story that is told with such detail and frankness but avoids being over-the-top. It's clear that events that seem shocking and unbelievable to readers were just life as she knew it for Tara, which left me feeling a mixture of heartbreak and awe. Tara is clearly a strong, intelligent, and resourceful woman from the very beginning, and she shows this without being self-serving in her writing. How she was able to go from never having heard of the Holocaust as a college freshman to getting her PhD from Harvard is mind-boggling just to read, so I can't imagine how Tara felt as she actually navigated through this new way of life.As far as memoirs go, I thought Educated was one of the most well-crafted ones I've read in a long time. Thanks to NetGalley for the early review copy.
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  • Gilbert Saller
    January 1, 1970
    Against the weight of a survivalist family, run by the heartbreaking delusions and legalism of a bipolar father, void of the safety and protection that should describe the word "family", Tara Westover journeys to set herself apart, earn an education, and ultimately die to an old version of herself to become stronger. Education can be powerful, and this is a powerful memoir.One reason I like reading memoirs and biographies is that they remind me that everyone has a story to tell. Sometimes my pro Against the weight of a survivalist family, run by the heartbreaking delusions and legalism of a bipolar father, void of the safety and protection that should describe the word "family", Tara Westover journeys to set herself apart, earn an education, and ultimately die to an old version of herself to become stronger. Education can be powerful, and this is a powerful memoir.One reason I like reading memoirs and biographies is that they remind me that everyone has a story to tell. Sometimes my problem is that I'm busy or rushing, and just don't take the time to converse, and so it's always good and refreshing to remember to slow down, be quiet, and listen. Anyway, the ending is redemptive, and that's probably what I enjoyed most while reading. Tara is obviously a talented writer, and hopefully this debut book won't be her only one. Definitely a book to anticipate for 2018.Highly recommended...
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  • Lisa Guidarini
    January 1, 1970
    Growing up sheltered from the outside world, her home birth unreported out of fear her father’s imagined “Illuminati” (i.e., the U.S. government) would swoop down and morally corrupt her, Tara Westover was the child of devout Mormon survivalists, marooned in the mountains of Idaho.Physically and mentally abused by her father and brothers, semi-neglected by a mother brain-damaged by an automobile accident, she grew up with little to knowledge of the outside world. She had never heard of the Holoc Growing up sheltered from the outside world, her home birth unreported out of fear her father’s imagined “Illuminati” (i.e., the U.S. government) would swoop down and morally corrupt her, Tara Westover was the child of devout Mormon survivalists, marooned in the mountains of Idaho.Physically and mentally abused by her father and brothers, semi-neglected by a mother brain-damaged by an automobile accident, she grew up with little to knowledge of the outside world. She had never heard of the Holocaust, knew nothing of historical events save the warped, grossly inaccurate versions fed to her by her father.Tara was not allowed to attend school. Treated solely by her herbalist mother, she never saw a doctor.Her resilience saved her. Taking control of her education, in her early teens she began buying text books. Despite no formal schooling, she met the requirements to enter Brigham Young University. Boosted by scholarships and sympathetic, influential people, eventually she would graduate from Cambridge with a PhD.Educated is about gritty determination. All is laid bare, yet the telling is balanced. It’s an emotionally difficult read. I cringed so many times, caught up in the horror of beatings she took, horrific injuries sustained by herself and family members. She saw her brother’s severe burns fusing jeans to his legs, the same brother with a hole cracked in his skull exposing his brain, her father’s melted faced from fire he shouldn’t have survived.Treated by her herbalist mother, survive they did.The prose style is matter of fact, detached. This is not a negative. It avoids the distraction of emotional outbursts, tempering justifiable rage and fear. She does not allow the characters to be villainized. As in life, none are without redeeming qualities.Despite what she endured, Tara Westover loved her family.I wanted her to hate them. Infuriated by what she endured, my visceral wish was to see the innocent avenged. She knew best, keeping a calm head even when I couldn’t. I wondered how can she keep going back? Why is she risking her safety?Unconditional love for family, that’s why.Educated is Tara Westover’s story of personal strength, without the slightest bit of self-righteousness. Very like Jeannette Walls’ The Glass Castle, it’s not as lyrical but no less forthright and moving.At its conclusion inspirational, even hopeful, Educated is one of the finest memoirs I’ve read.
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  • Kathleen Brunnett
    January 1, 1970
    A must read! I haven't been so captivated by a book in a long time. This memoir is the story of a girl who grew up in a survivalist Mormon family in Idaho. Her family didn't trust the public school system so she just never had an education, homeschool or otherwise. Her household was filled with injuries and physical and mental abuse. What is so captivating is that the author went on to graduate from BYU and earn a doctorate from Cambridge. Her whole story sounds like fiction, but follow how she A must read! I haven't been so captivated by a book in a long time. This memoir is the story of a girl who grew up in a survivalist Mormon family in Idaho. Her family didn't trust the public school system so she just never had an education, homeschool or otherwise. Her household was filled with injuries and physical and mental abuse. What is so captivating is that the author went on to graduate from BYU and earn a doctorate from Cambridge. Her whole story sounds like fiction, but follow how she went from uneducated to educated and you'll just be shaking your head the whole time. The storyline will remind you a bit of The Glass Castle and you'll recognized some patterns discussed in Hillbilly Elegy as well. Wow, please read this book.
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  • Neanderthal
    January 1, 1970
    Tara Westover recounts her childhood and youth in her family of fundamental Mormons in Idaho, but the memoir is not about Mormonism. Terrified by the events at Ruby Ridge, the Westovers strive to live off the grid, preparing for the End of Days, being born at home, not attending school or consulting doctors or nurses. Four of the seven children don't have birth certificates and Tara uses pseudonyms for her parents and most of her siblings."Gene," the father runs a scrap yard and exposes his chil Tara Westover recounts her childhood and youth in her family of fundamental Mormons in Idaho, but the memoir is not about Mormonism. Terrified by the events at Ruby Ridge, the Westovers strive to live off the grid, preparing for the End of Days, being born at home, not attending school or consulting doctors or nurses. Four of the seven children don't have birth certificates and Tara uses pseudonyms for her parents and most of her siblings."Gene," the father runs a scrap yard and exposes his children to many hazards by forcing them to work there and mother "Faye" acts as area midwife and successful herbal healer. Despite a haphazard homeschooling, Tara manages to obtain a higher education on many levels.(I obtained pre-publication thanks to NetGalley.)
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  • Maggie Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    A good memoir is like good fiction: the reader enters into the life of the author, feeling the emotions and experiencing the events. Educated by Tara Westover joins the club of great memoirs like The Glass Castle and Liar’s Club with a story of a girl who is part of a highly dysfunctional family but pushes through her doubts, her love and her distrust of herself to become her own person. Westover supplies visceral descriptions of her feelings during events so that the reader enters completely in A good memoir is like good fiction: the reader enters into the life of the author, feeling the emotions and experiencing the events. Educated by Tara Westover joins the club of great memoirs like The Glass Castle and Liar’s Club with a story of a girl who is part of a highly dysfunctional family but pushes through her doubts, her love and her distrust of herself to become her own person. Westover supplies visceral descriptions of her feelings during events so that the reader enters completely into the moment. Her descriptions makes the reader love her mountain, hate the smells and chaos of her home, fear the dangers of the scrapheaps and yearn for the towers of Cambridge. That it was possible for her to overcome her miseducation to earn her Phd is awe inspiring. Recommended for all book discussion groups. Thank you to Netgalley for the review copy.
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  • Janieh Hermann
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best memoirs I have a read in a long time.
  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    This author has accomplished more in the past 13 years than most could accomplish in multiple lifetimes. She pulled herself up and out of a fanatical survivalist family where she received no education for her first 16 years. At 16 she studied for the ACTs and was accepted and enrolled at BYU and eventually received her PhD in 2014 in Cambridge. Based on what she endured and overcame it is challenging for me to rank and review this book. Her spirt and achievements are a 100 (out of a 5 point scal This author has accomplished more in the past 13 years than most could accomplish in multiple lifetimes. She pulled herself up and out of a fanatical survivalist family where she received no education for her first 16 years. At 16 she studied for the ACTs and was accepted and enrolled at BYU and eventually received her PhD in 2014 in Cambridge. Based on what she endured and overcame it is challenging for me to rank and review this book. Her spirt and achievements are a 100 (out of a 5 point scale)! The writing is good and mostly engaging but I did find it dragging during the middle third of the book. Her story was eye-opening to the horrors some children endure who are raised by severally mentally ill parents. Overall I encourage people to read this book. We owe it to these children to learn their trials and tribulations and to learn from their terror. We need to be aware so if we ever encounter it we can help. And, if you ever doubt you can accomplish something, read this book and think again - you can.Thank you to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for providing me with an early release of this book.
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  • Kristen Beverly
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Wow wow wow wow wow! I just can’t even believe how amazing this book is. How proficient, how inspiring, how gut wrenching, how just purely amazing this book is. I could not put it down and I was rooting for Tara the whole way. By the end, she feels like a dear friend who is telling you her story & everything she has learned from life. You absolutely must read this book.
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  • Meredithla
    January 1, 1970
    Phenomenal read-in the class of The Glass Castle. It's a must-read!
  • Bri (girlwithabookblog.com)
    January 1, 1970
    This memoir had an effect on me and I want to recommend it to everyone. Educated by Tara Westover is a memoir about family obligations, systems of control, and the power of education. It was a hard, but good read. Westover grew up in a strict, Mormon household in rural middle America with parents who had their own interpretation of Mormonism that they proselytized to their children and used to condemn others' interpretations of divine faith, including other Mormons. The parents did not trust the This memoir had an effect on me and I want to recommend it to everyone. Educated by Tara Westover is a memoir about family obligations, systems of control, and the power of education. It was a hard, but good read. Westover grew up in a strict, Mormon household in rural middle America with parents who had their own interpretation of Mormonism that they proselytized to their children and used to condemn others' interpretations of divine faith, including other Mormons. The parents did not trust the government, which extended to not birthing most of their children in hospitals because they were part of the evil "medical establishment",  not legally recording most of their children's births until many years later, not immunizing their children or permitting them to visit doctors for care in favor of homeopathy, and not enrolling their children in schools for fear the schools would brainwash their children with nonsense. The denial of all of these things to their children, particularly access to an education as the children weren't really schooled at home either, was a way to indoctrinate the children into the parents' belief system, bound the children to their parents' sphere of control so that the children may never leave, and limit the children from access to other ways of thinking that would allow the children to be able to question their family's way of life. Westover's tale highlights how important access to an education is as she details the life circumstances of her siblings -- those who managed to be admitted to college, after secretly studying for standardized testing, went on to receive doctorates, whereas the others never received high school diplomas or GEDs and subsequently had limited job options and continued to be employees of their parents' businesses as they had been since they were children. The memoir is broken into three parts, beginning with Westover's childhood, transitioning into Westover's teen years when she enrolls in an undergraduate program, and the last pieces include her venturing to another part of the world for education purposes and having her worldview expanded even more than her undergraduate experiences initially opened. While education definitely plays a central role in this memoir, a large part of Westover's story involves controlling family dynamics, the emotional abuse that often rains down from the controlling heads of household, unfettered physical abuse that family members conveniently ignore or outright deny because acknowledgement of its actuality could challenge their pleasant forms of reality, and outright misogyny about a women's place in the family and in the world that is shielded from question by religious morales. While Westover's education granted her access to many things, it also created many conflicts with her family and led to estrangements from certain members. Becoming "educated" isn't always cost-free and Westover's story illuminates some of the challenges that can be associated with advancing oneself, whilst one's family tries to hold them back. This was a book that I needed to read and I hope that it is enlightening for others. Disclaimer: I was provided with a digital copy of this book for free from Random House via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in the review are my own and have not been influenced by Random House or NetGalley.For more reviews, check out www.girlwithabookblog.com!
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  • librarianka
    January 1, 1970
    Everybody loves survivors' memoirs. We especially like to cheer them on their way to freeing themselves and finally making it. Tara Westover's story is one such survivor's tale. What's unique about it is how she used the power of her intellect. This fantastically gifted, talented and brilliant young woman was deprived of a conventional education through normal schools by her extreme, paranoiac, religious zealot of a father who saw conspiracy of iluminati everywhere including public school system Everybody loves survivors' memoirs. We especially like to cheer them on their way to freeing themselves and finally making it. Tara Westover's story is one such survivor's tale. What's unique about it is how she used the power of her intellect. This fantastically gifted, talented and brilliant young woman was deprived of a conventional education through normal schools by her extreme, paranoiac, religious zealot of a father who saw conspiracy of iluminati everywhere including public school system and healthcare system. His children were pulled out of schools, or never sent to one, never allowed to use doctors and hospitals even in the most life-threatening circumstances. She was educated instead through her life experiences within this very dramatic and abusive family whose particular brand of religion served to cover the subjugation and abuse of women. Her lessons were about paranoia, subjugation, fanaticism, humiliation and helplessness. The cognitive dissonance between what she was experiencing and what she was told her experience was, led her to a loss of herself. The fact that she kept journals helped her to discern what was real and what was not, but in view of eyewitnesses denying her accounts, she often was unsure and kept doubting herself. The required demanded loyalty to the crazy family almost destroyed her. Only through unbelievable power of the intellect and discerning thinking, when she finally decided to leave and enroll in college, she was able to start making sense of her life. I have never before read such heart-stopping and heart-wrenching book. I was reminded of Edward St. Aubyn's Patrick Melrose novels in which he reworked his particular trauma. Tara Westover is a gifted intellectual, an analytical thinker to whom a professor at Cambridge University referred as "pure gold" speaking of her power of thinking and reasoning. Through study of history and historians she was able to see many view points and discover that her own perspective was a valid thing. She then started to write her own history. It is a fast read, hard to put down page turner although at times one needs to stop, simply because the degree of intensity of terrible things happening is so high that the reader needs to take breaks. I am in complete awe of the power possessed by Tara Westover and her ability to overcome such deep trauma. All those who helped her, various professors along the course of her studies, deserve a great deal of appreciation for recognizing her abilities and giving a helping hand. Ultimately she obtained her education at Cambridge and Harvard universities which elevated her into the peaks of scholarly thinking and placed her among great thinkers as an equal. The revenge was sweet. However Tara Westover never stopped loving her family, she did her best trying to remove herself and to understand. This is simple a feat of marvel. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes to read about adversity but also about intellectual pursuits.Thank you NetGalley for loaning an electronic version of the reader's copy of this title.
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