Rosie Colored Glasses
Sometimes even all the love in the world is not enough to save someone.Willow Thorpe knows friction… The friction between her parents, Rosie and Rex. The friction inside herself as she tries to navigate two worlds since their divorce.But life has not always been like this.When Rosie and Rex first met, theirs was an attraction of opposites. Rosie lived life for those heightened moments when love reveals its true secrets. Rex lived life safely, by the rules. Common sense would say theirs was a union not meant to last, but it was genuine love.Now Willow just wants to be with Rosie, to bask in her mother’s outsize glow and, she thinks, protection. Because Rosie is the only person who can make Willow feel totally alive and completely loved.But as Willow and Rosie and Rex try harder and harder to stay connected as a family, Rosie’s manic tornado of love continues to sweep up everyone in sight, ultimately to heartbreaking results.

Rosie Colored Glasses Details

TitleRosie Colored Glasses
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 20th, 2018
PublisherMira Books
ISBN-139780778330691
Rating
GenreFiction

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Rosie Colored Glasses Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    I read the description and for some reason I thought it would be a lighter read. Maybe it was the use of the word whimsical. It wasn’t. It's a sad story, sadder even knowing that the character of Rosie and the story in some ways is based on the author's free spirit mother who was addicted to opiates. Sad because this starts out as a love story between two people who are polar opposites and in spite of loving each other, they both know that it won't last . Sad because when the marriage ends, the I read the description and for some reason I thought it would be a lighter read. Maybe it was the use of the word whimsical. It wasn’t. It's a sad story, sadder even knowing that the character of Rosie and the story in some ways is based on the author's free spirit mother who was addicted to opiates. Sad because this starts out as a love story between two people who are polar opposites and in spite of loving each other, they both know that it won't last . Sad because when the marriage ends, the two children of this broken family are impacted to the core, affected in ways that their mother and father don't see. Sad because eleven year old Willow doesn't know that her rigid, structured father Rex does love her. He doesn't know how to show it, doesn't know how to make her let him in . Sad because, her mother Rosie who is fun loving and lets Willow and Asher eat candy and stay up to watch movies on school nights and paint the walls with their hands, doesn't know or can't know how to parent. I found this difficult to read at times with parenting that was questionable at the least and irresponsible at times. A timely read as it highlights opiate addiction but it also focuses on depression. The chapters alternate between the present where Willow and Asher are moved back and forth between their parents' houses and the very different worlds they live in and chapters going back to the past when Rex and Rosie first meet. Then the past converges with the present day sad story. I liked this much more than I thought I would. It's a story of people 's flaws, afflictions, a story of redemption. Predictably sad and elevating but worth reading this heartfelt story. I received an advanced copy of this book from Mira/HarperCollins through Edelweiss.
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    When I was about thirty pages into this book I wrote in the comment section of my updates, that Willow was going to break my heart. She did, but what I didn't expect was that this whole family would. It is not that I am getting marshmellowy, but rather than going into a long discourse on my personal life, I'll just say this was a novel in which I could relate. Plus, as the author tells us this is a semi-autobiographical novel, a novel it took many years to be able to writeWillow, fifth grade, bu When I was about thirty pages into this book I wrote in the comment section of my updates, that Willow was going to break my heart. She did, but what I didn't expect was that this whole family would. It is not that I am getting marshmellowy, but rather than going into a long discourse on my personal life, I'll just say this was a novel in which I could relate. Plus, as the author tells us this is a semi-autobiographical novel, a novel it took many years to be able to writeWillow, fifth grade, bullied on the bus and in her school, her mom Rosie with all her love, sense of fun, and yes irresponsibility, made Willows life bearable. Rose, a free spirit, and though it doesn't say, my guess is she was bipolar, self medicating with opiates. Gil, found something in her that he needed in his structured, routine following life, at least for a while. Asher, an adorable sounding boy, front teeth missing, causing him to lisp with his R's, the most balanced, just happy to be wherever. This little family comes apart, but there is still so much love between them, these people who tumble into a fate they have little control over. There is so much feeling in this book, despite the rather simple way it is written, hearing from each character. So much love, joy, hurt, pain, want and need. I felt them all in a very visceral way, as I said my connection with this book made it hard for me to read. There are difficult things, even dangerous moments in this novel. Many things, parenting that is easy to find fault with, but not an absence of love, in the many different ways it can be shown. Most of all it is so realistic, once again believe me I know. A wonderful, but heartbreaking novel, that the author has shown great courage in writing. The healing power of the written word.ARC from Netgalley and Edelweiss.
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    Rosie Colored Glasses is an emotional and heart breaking read. To be honest, I was not expecting to be so moved and touched by this novel. Brianna Wolfe delivers a rare and inspiring novel about loss, love, attachment, and relationships. What I loved about this novel is how Brianna was able to create a "story" within a story. I loved this!! The novel starts off with introducing us to a unique but unhealthy love relationship between Rosie and Rex. What can I say about Rosie?! She's wild and quirk Rosie Colored Glasses is an emotional and heart breaking read. To be honest, I was not expecting to be so moved and touched by this novel. Brianna Wolfe delivers a rare and inspiring novel about loss, love, attachment, and relationships. What I loved about this novel is how Brianna was able to create a "story" within a story. I loved this!! The novel starts off with introducing us to a unique but unhealthy love relationship between Rosie and Rex. What can I say about Rosie?! She's wild and quirky who loves to step out of the lines with life. And then there's Rex... who is the complete opposite of Rosie... a planner, determined, and serious about his life. These two somehow form a love relationship that ironically they both know will not last? (How does this happen).... I guess love can get blurry sometimes right?... YES we all know this.Let's fast forward to 12 years and out pops their daughter Willow and another son Asher a few years later. Rex and Rosie have now divorced (which isn't a spoiler)... and are sharing time with both children. Willow is a unique little girl that takes after her mother. Willow is a fifth grader that wears the same purple leggings and black t-shirt to school every day. She also has severe trauma/anxiety which causes her to pee her pants. She prefers the love that she has with her mother. Willow and her father Rex don't have the best relationship and attachment has become strained. This is where I was touched the most I think ..... I could see myself in Willow's shoes having the strained and unhealthy relationship that has formed with Willow and her father. I, unfortunately have always had an unhealthy relationship with my father and feel that the love has never been reciprocated my entire life. I wonder sometimes what causes some children to be closer to mothers/fathers? Both stories slowly emerge as themes of addiction, loss, and mental illness cross this family which ultimately tears them apart but brings them closer in the end. There were multiple times I was holding my heart and aching for this family. This is not a light read my friends. I was touched the most by Willow and the amount of strength that this little girl has and truly how resistant she is. The ending could not have been better.... oh my gosh what a pleasant surprise between the relationship Willow has with her father Rex. I truly was inspired and touched by their relationship (ironically.... ). Thank you to Netgalley, Brianna Wolfson, and Harlequin for an advanced arc in exchange for an honest review. 4.5 strong stars! Highly recommended!!! :)Expected publication date is 2/20/18.
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  • Cheri
    January 1, 1970
    ”Willow Thorpe knew friction. The heat it created when one thing rubbed against another. When one world rubbed against another.” From the prologue, we know that Willow’s world is filled with tension, with every “Late again, Rosie.” followed by a dismissive retort from her mother. With every time the walls of her world changed from the fanciful, art-filled walls to generic white ones that scream out that the rules are different here, the children feel the change. But how did this come to be? And ”Willow Thorpe knew friction. The heat it created when one thing rubbed against another. When one world rubbed against another.” From the prologue, we know that Willow’s world is filled with tension, with every “Late again, Rosie.” followed by a dismissive retort from her mother. With every time the walls of her world changed from the fanciful, art-filled walls to generic white ones that scream out that the rules are different here, the children feel the change. But how did this come to be? And how did her abundantly affectionate mother who lives by what feels right and good to her in the moment end up married to her emotionally distant father who is a stickler for a neat, ordered life, and rules? When Rosie was in her mid-twenties, she believed with her entire being in love. A magical kind of love where the gift of loving and being loved would change everything, and that love was endless. She wanted it for herself, but she wanted it for everyone, as well. Whenever she would come upon a couple in the park, on the subway, anywhere, she would dream a life for them, inventing conversations, loving touches, the small moments that confirm their love. And so, when Rosie had the change to take a job at a flower shop, it seemed as if destiny was tapping her on the shoulder. This was her chance to immerse herself in all that love that was being sent as flowers, imagining herself privy to the stories behind the flowers. And this is how she meets Rex, who calls in an order of flowers to be delivered, and Rosie asks him what he would like the card to say. Rex responds in frustration, as though he has never sent flowers before, a non-heartfelt message, and hangs up. So Rosie takes it upon herself to intercede and send a message that is very unlike anything Rex would have sent. And so they meet, Rex ranting at her until he stops and stares at her, taking in her willingness to let him rant without letting it affect her. ”Rex was struck breathless by it all.” And if your heart is melting, it won’t be for long, because this isn’t that love story. This will melt your heart, then chill it, and then smash it until it breaks into little pieces. When two people who see the world in completely different ways are so determined that their view is the absolutely only one that is right, that it is the only one that their children need, it is heartbreaking. The confusion and division it creates inside of these children who desire only to be shown the same love they’ve always known, and for their world to not be in turmoil, confusion and disarray. To go from a manic world abundant in some frenzied form of love and joy with no rules to a controlled, overly structured world with little joy, no expressions of love and with rules for everything is, at the very least, confusing. And then there are the drugs that Rosie has been taking, perhaps in the beginning for physical pain, but then to take the edge off life. Depression: the flip side of her manic, fun-loving self. Eventually she needs them more and more often. Endangering the children, Willow and Asher. Time shifts throughout this story, from the past to the more recent past until time catches up to the present, and although this is a sad story overall, there is a lot of love sprinkled throughout these pages, and some moving, heartening moments, as well. And all those broken pieces of your heart will be put back together again, not without their fault lines, their broken jagged edges, but by piecing their cracks together into a new vision made up of the old. Together, when the light eventually gets in, it creates an image that even more beautiful than before. Pub Date: 20 Feb 2018Many thanks for the ARC provided by Harlequin US & Canada
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book!!!!! I was a mess by the end but I loved every single page!This book reads like a fairy tale which I LOVED!!! Very nice touch. This book touched on so many things: love, loss, mental illness, addiction, bullying, family, Mother-child relationships, Father-Child relationships, etc.Rosie is eccentric! She doesn't stay in one spot for too long. She wanders around doing as she pleases living here and there, working numerous jobs, never staying rooted for too long. She skips to her I LOVED this book!!!!! I was a mess by the end but I loved every single page!This book reads like a fairy tale which I LOVED!!! Very nice touch. This book touched on so many things: love, loss, mental illness, addiction, bullying, family, Mother-child relationships, Father-Child relationships, etc.Rosie is eccentric! She doesn't stay in one spot for too long. She wanders around doing as she pleases living here and there, working numerous jobs, never staying rooted for too long. She skips to her own beat. She meets Rex when he orders flowers for another woman and Rosie changes the note on the card. He confronts her about it and finds that there is something so different yet irresistible about Rosie. Rex is the complete opposite of Rosie. He is grounded, ordered and happy to live a normal life. He is drawn to Roise's quirkiness and energy. She brings a little fun and chaos to his life. Both have their doubts about whether this relationship will last but both love the other and forge forward with their lives. When they get married and have children things go downhill. I don't want to go into this too much as I don't want to give away too much of the plot.This book also focuses on Willow their daughter. She is quirky herself and has a close relationship with her Mother. She loves her Mother's whimsical way of living. Her Mother is fun, always quick to give love and affection. Her Mother accepts her and loves her. Willow is happiest with her Mother. She views her father as being unloving, cold, distant and never pleased with anything she does. They have a strained relationship and Willow is sad in his home. This books is told through flashbacks, different perspectives, and has a fairy tale feel to it. This book is both heartbreaking and heartwarming. This is a story about love in various forms: romantic love, love of a child for a parent, love of a parent for a child and also sibling love. This is a really beautiful story that had me reaching for my Kleenex. Sometimes love does not conquer all. Sometimes our good intentions hurt others. Sometimes love cannot save someone on a destructive path. But Love can also heal us and make us stronger. I highly recommend this book.I received a copy of this book from Harlequin and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com
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  • Sharon Metcalf
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsHeartfelt.    Evocative.    Poignant.    Beautiful.   These are just a few of the adjectives that found their way into my notes as I read this book.   A book I loved and which should really be required to carry warnings to potential readers.    You should be warned that your heart will be given a workout.    It will be stretched, it may be trampled, it will soar and eventually it should fall back into shape but it will be ever so slightly different.    Different because this family cons 4.5 starsHeartfelt.    Evocative.    Poignant.    Beautiful.   These are just a few of the adjectives that found their way into my notes as I read this book.   A book I loved and which should really be required to carry warnings to potential readers.    You should be warned that your heart will be given a workout.    It will be stretched, it may be trampled, it will soar and eventually it should fall back into shape but it will be ever so slightly different.    Different because this family consisting of  Rosie, Rex, Willow and Asher will have  wriggled their way in and found a permanent place there.    You should also be warned that tissues may be required.    Just when I least expected it, another surprisingly tender moment would sneak up on me causing tears to well.   (Ok, who am I kidding....tears actually flowed at least once).Alternating between the past and the present this story is mainly presented from Willows perspective in the here and now.     She's  an 11 year old girl who idolises Rosie,  her zany, fun, unorthadox but completely loving mum.    A girl who "knows" her father Rex doesn't love her because he's mean and cold.   He's strict, he disciplines and forces structure upon her and her adorable younger brother Asher.        Willow just does not fit anywhere (except enfolded in her mum's arms).   She's different from other kids and my heart broke a little each time Willow was taunted and teased at school or on the bus.However, no sooner than my heart was breaking over Willow, as quick as a flash it was happy again as we travelled back 12 years and fell into her parents backstory.    A sweet love story between Rex and Rosie.    They are poorly matched and they know it, yet it's their differences that attract.   They are both well aware this relationship is highly unlikely to last even though they'd like it to. They had " an unlikely beautiful love"... "a nuanced and special complementary love"    The author Brianna Wolfson did a magnificent job of successfully weaving many themes into this fictitious story.   Family, love, depression, love, family, drug addiction, family, love, parental mistakes, misunderstandings, misconceptions, bullying.   Did I mention family and love?      A story she based firmly on her memories of a mother who for all intents and purposes was Rosie.   As she wrote in her letter to the reader  "It is a work of fiction, but still, to me, this novel is told from my perspective, which will forever be that of a little girl trying to understand the thoughts, feelings and choices of her parents.If you've read all the way to the end of this lengthy review you must surely get the picture.    All that's left to say is I strongly encourage you to read this book.  My utmost thanks to Brianna Wolfson,   the publishers MIRA books and Edelweiss for this digital review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Delphine Lurin
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC copy of Rosie Colored Glasses in exchange for an honest review. Thanks goes to NetGalley as well as Mira Books for this advanced copy which is expected to be released February 20, 2018.Rosie Colored Glasses from author, Brianna Wolfson is, straight to the point an evocative, heart-wrenching, heart-breaking read. I was not expecting to be so incredibly moved by this book. I’ve been reading a lot of books pertaining to touchy themes such as depression and suicide given the bleak I received an ARC copy of Rosie Colored Glasses in exchange for an honest review. Thanks goes to NetGalley as well as Mira Books for this advanced copy which is expected to be released February 20, 2018.Rosie Colored Glasses from author, Brianna Wolfson is, straight to the point an evocative, heart-wrenching, heart-breaking read. I was not expecting to be so incredibly moved by this book. I’ve been reading a lot of books pertaining to touchy themes such as depression and suicide given the bleak mood I’ve been in lately and of all that I’ve read so far, including 13 Reasons Why, this book took me so far over the edge that I fear that I just may break down again just writing this review. Rosie Colored Glasses is a story within a story, and neither can do without the other.Twelve years ago, according to story time we have a dreamy, yet troublesome love story between two unlikely figures: Rosie – a quirky and carefree gal working in a flower shop who can’t seem to remain in one place for long enough to be settled. And then there’s Rex who is the absolute antithesis of Rosie – serious, determined, and completely ‘with it.’ Rosie and Rex both know their relationship will not end well, but neither have the will power to disengage themselves from the other. So just as expected, we have a harmonic yet sentimental relationship that unfolds, beginning with Rosie’s decision to attach a Cummings poem to Rex’s girlfriends flower bouquet against Rex’s will. Result? Rex’s girlfriend gets dumped in a heart beat and it’s all Rosie and Rex. And the occasional pill-popping an weed-inhaling to turn love against itself and into fatal, and I mean fatal in the literal sense of the word, catastrophe.Let us fast forward twelve years to the present. Action: Rosie gives birth to a girl, Willow and then later a boy, Asher. Willow and her brother are shared by her divorced parents. Willow prefers her mother over her father while her brother is content just about anywhere and does not seem to tell the difference whether he is at his mom or his dad’s home. Willow is a fifth grader who is a loner at school, still wets her pants, and wears the same purple leggings and black t-shirt to school everyday. She is wholeheartedly attached to her mother and share’s her mom’s sweet tooth for Pixy Stix and Thursday Pizza Night.Told in the third person, both stories slowly converge as the author traverses such themes as mental illness, addiction, and suicide – all which tear this family apart only to bring them closer together by the end. I loved the structure of this stories and the chill I felt in some of the chapters. Wolfson portrayal of mental illness and the turmoil it can cause a family beautifully. There were multiple moments where I found myself gasping, aching, and longing to reach out for the family. The perspectives are diverse and do not leave any questions unanswered – be it Rex, Rosie, or Willow. Wolfson dives into the character’s minds and illustrates their suffering in such an evocative manner that it was impossible for me not to get choked up at certain parts.Love in Rosie Colored Glasses is defined in the most obscure sense of the word. There is romance, mother-daughter love, friendship and even love masked by hatred. Emotions that I never even know could be dug out of my conscious rose to the surface in the parts describing Rosie’s mental decline and her ultimate decision to escape fro m the world that had at the same time caused her pain and joy. Willow’s strength and determination comes, ironically from her father as she witnesses her mom’s highs and lows. She amazingly holds herself together and finds the courage to take care of her brother and ignore the stares and brutal comments about her on the school playground. All Willow wants is love. She tries desperately to hold onto her mother and no matter how had she tries, she finds herself lost in a maze of circumstances which are altogether dangerous and risky for her young heart.Wolfson’s writing is raw and deep. I felt as though I was entering into the character’s minds and perceiving events as they were happening – in real time. Taking that this book alternates narrative voice, I was very impressed at the way in which Wolfson was successful in adapting the story’s tone to the character of focus. Rosie’s parts were scattered, depressing, and fairy-tale like. Rex’s was serious, logical, and altogether made the most sense. Willow’s was just so real and spiritual that I loved her’s the most. There were times in this book that I found myself skipping ahead to find out what happens to the characters. It’s hard to believe that this book is a work of fiction – it all just seemed so real to me as my tears were as I read.Between Rosie’s dependence on opiates, Rex’s struggle with expressing his love for his daughter, and Willow’s sole desire to love and be loved, Rosie Colored Glasses is a delicate and shattering tale about the meanings of love and the multiple paths one takes and stumbles upon to achieve it. I recommend it to all my readers – young and mature for the simple reason that it will affect you mentally and emotionally, and change the way you perceive yourself in relation to your loved ones forever.
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  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    Boy meets girl and they fall in love, except they're totally wrong for each other. Although Rosie is playful, cute and fun, she's flitted from job to job, place to place never able to settle herself down anywhere or anytime. Not unusual for a twenty-something, but eventually most people coast to a grown-up spot of responsibility. Rosie seems to always be in double-time, never able to turn her brain off at night or put her restless body on pause. (A first hint of ADHD, anxiety) Rex was her exact Boy meets girl and they fall in love, except they're totally wrong for each other. Although Rosie is playful, cute and fun, she's flitted from job to job, place to place never able to settle herself down anywhere or anytime. Not unusual for a twenty-something, but eventually most people coast to a grown-up spot of responsibility. Rosie seems to always be in double-time, never able to turn her brain off at night or put her restless body on pause. (A first hint of ADHD, anxiety) Rex was her exact opposite, still with decent energy, but a man with a plan. He had lists for his lists and he loved to check off each completed task. Structure, order, and control is what drove Rex's life. Then he met Rosie; she was not like any girl he'd ever met and he was fascinated. Her spontaneity scared him.It's a well written story, charming at points, frustrating at others. The main event however, could have been prevented. The mental disorders evident in Rosie: anxiety, ADHD, depression, bipolar, post-partum depression, self-diagnosis & self-medication, addiction, should have been addressed and helped with good therapy, psychiatry, and counseling. Her stay at rehab was too short.Communication within the family, especially with the children was extremely lacking. Yes, it's fiction with an irresponsible example to all those struggling with addiction, especially opiod, .Get help, you cannot do it on your own, Don't end your life. There is another way!
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  • MomIsReading
    January 1, 1970
    I'm going to have to go against the grain here on this review. The blurb about for fans of Where'd You Go Bernadette feels completely off. I do feel the author is a great writer. I just wasn't that captivated by how the story was unveiled. It was a little too "once upon a time". I didn't like Rosie from the start and honestly I had a hard time connecting to Willow. Perhaps if we knew why Rosie was like she was I might have had some bit of understanding. Who I did feel bad for was Rex. He really I'm going to have to go against the grain here on this review. The blurb about for fans of Where'd You Go Bernadette feels completely off. I do feel the author is a great writer. I just wasn't that captivated by how the story was unveiled. It was a little too "once upon a time". I didn't like Rosie from the start and honestly I had a hard time connecting to Willow. Perhaps if we knew why Rosie was like she was I might have had some bit of understanding. Who I did feel bad for was Rex. He really got such a raw deal in this. None of us are perfect but at least I felt what he did was from the heart. Willow seemed to have some deep rooted issues that would require a lot of therapy. To go from where she was at the end and then flash forward to 15 years later with the way it was wrapped up didn't feel realistic.
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  • Mara
    January 1, 1970
    Willow's parents are complete opposites. Rosie is a free-spirit who believes in the power of colors, the Rocky Horror Picture Show, and not keeping to a schedule, and seems to exist solely on Pixie Stix, cream soda, and pizza. Rex is firm and regimented and believes in balanced dinners and to-do lists. Opposites may attract, but they can also explode. And what happens to the kids when the attraction ends? Willow can tell you, but it's not pretty.This book had the potential to be an interesting e Willow's parents are complete opposites. Rosie is a free-spirit who believes in the power of colors, the Rocky Horror Picture Show, and not keeping to a schedule, and seems to exist solely on Pixie Stix, cream soda, and pizza. Rex is firm and regimented and believes in balanced dinners and to-do lists. Opposites may attract, but they can also explode. And what happens to the kids when the attraction ends? Willow can tell you, but it's not pretty.This book had the potential to be an interesting exploration of a child's experience of navigating divorced parents. Unfortunately, Rex and Rosie are both such complete caricatures of their types that it felt like reading about cardboard cut-outs. They are almost exclusively written to type, except when they do something so wholly out of character that it's nearly inexplicable.
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  • Stacy Fetters
    January 1, 1970
    "Because Rex Thorpe finally knew what love was. And she tasted like Pixy Stix and wore polka-dot underwear."This warmed and broke my heart at the same time. From the start, I knew that these characters were going to break me and I wasn’t wrong. A truly heartwarming read that left me breathless. No words can help me express my true feelings for this book. But I do say these words with tears in my eyes and goosebumps on my arms. This magnificent tale of family, love, and heartbreak will explore al "Because Rex Thorpe finally knew what love was. And she tasted like Pixy Stix and wore polka-dot underwear."This warmed and broke my heart at the same time. From the start, I knew that these characters were going to break me and I wasn’t wrong. A truly heartwarming read that left me breathless. No words can help me express my true feelings for this book. But I do say these words with tears in my eyes and goosebumps on my arms. This magnificent tale of family, love, and heartbreak will explore all kinds of love even if it’s tragic. I loved every page of this and I wish everyone would give this a chance. Please judge this book by its beautiful cover! I’m forever grateful to the publisher and Goodreads for having a giveaway for this book. They helped me discover a book that will be my favorite of the year and the year just started. I’m ready to ride this emotional roller coaster again and maybe live my life a little bit like Rosie. 💋
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  • Marti
    January 1, 1970
    This book which I read in two days has touched my heart and opened my eyes. This book really went in depth on mental issues. The author made you feel the hurt Willow was going through. I cried the last 30% of the book. This is a novel that I will encourage others to read. This really is an outstanding piece of work
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    Gotta go against the grain here. I feel like no one else was thinking when they read this book, just feeling. I really wanted to like it, and started out liking it, but just ended up frustrated, trying to burn through to the end. I couldn't stop thinking: WHERE ARE ALL THE OTHER ADULTS?? There are 2 parents doing a terrible job with their children and somehow there is not one other family member, teacher, therapist, etc present (and with no explanation as to why not). Are you trying to tell me t Gotta go against the grain here. I feel like no one else was thinking when they read this book, just feeling. I really wanted to like it, and started out liking it, but just ended up frustrated, trying to burn through to the end. I couldn't stop thinking: WHERE ARE ALL THE OTHER ADULTS?? There are 2 parents doing a terrible job with their children and somehow there is not one other family member, teacher, therapist, etc present (and with no explanation as to why not). Are you trying to tell me that Rex didn't call up his mom when his life starting crashing down?? Or that he (a wealthy, very rational human) didn't get Willow a therapist? That no teacher intervened with all Willow's issues? It drove me nuts. And this also means there's no one around to address Rosie's mental illness. This mental illness that was confusing in the first place- is she supposed to be bipolar? If so, why is she only manic for so long? Where were the depressive episodes before she had Asher?The parents are just such overblown exaggerated types I found them completely unrelatable. It would have been better if told exclusively from the child's perspective, like Where'd You Go Bernadette. Then these ellipses that so frustrated me could be understandable and left to the reader to theorize. I also would have then appreciated some of the more artful writing more- it would have made more sense and been more charming coming from exclusively a child's brain.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this book as it deals with a topic that I have had to endure in my life. I just felt the writing was too rushed, too forced, and didn't really touch on Rosie's mental health.I really liked Willow, and the complete seperation of the love she received from her Mom vs her Dad and why they loved her the way they did and how it was shaping her to be who she was. There were a lot of cute moments in the book, as well as heavy moments, and how the effect of your mental health can I really wanted to like this book as it deals with a topic that I have had to endure in my life. I just felt the writing was too rushed, too forced, and didn't really touch on Rosie's mental health.I really liked Willow, and the complete seperation of the love she received from her Mom vs her Dad and why they loved her the way they did and how it was shaping her to be who she was. There were a lot of cute moments in the book, as well as heavy moments, and how the effect of your mental health can shape your children. The ending and climax of why Rosie was the way Rosie was was the worst part of the book. The actual writing of Rosie's mental health felt incomplete. I just wanted more from the writer, it left a lot to be desired.(I received an advance copy of this book to review for a book club)
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  • Wit & Wonder Books
    January 1, 1970
    ***ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review***Poignant and heartrending, Rosie Colored Glasses by Brianna Wolfson dredged up so many emotions that I am not sure where to begin. Written in an unconventionally poetic style, this unique novel reaches deep down and tears your heart to pieces.Sweet Willow, a fifth grade girl, is different than the other children in her school. Awkward and quirky, she takes after her mother, Rosie. She struggles to cope with her parents separation a ***ARC provided by the author in exchange for an honest review***Poignant and heartrending, Rosie Colored Glasses by Brianna Wolfson dredged up so many emotions that I am not sure where to begin. Written in an unconventionally poetic style, this unique novel reaches deep down and tears your heart to pieces.Sweet Willow, a fifth grade girl, is different than the other children in her school. Awkward and quirky, she takes after her mother, Rosie. She struggles to cope with her parents separation at home, and the bullying of children on the bus and at school. Rosie, Willow’s mom is a free spirit that cannot be tamed. Eclectic and impulsive, she lives life by her feelings and moods, rather than by the restrictions society creates. Rex, Willow’s father is a serious, structured man, who happens into Rosie’s life and is taken by her indulgent easy-going attitude. Torn between his heart, and the knowledge that they are complete opposites, he gives in to his feelings and ends up falling madly in love Rosie.When Rosie and Rex encounter life’s challenges, they realize their differences may be too great, and raising their children separately may be the best thing for everyone. The book follows the transition for the children as they learn to live in two separate households that couldn’t be any more opposite, as well as flashing back to the early years of Rosie and Rex dating, marrying and having children.Follow Willow, her brother, and parents on this journey as they navigate life’s challenges, while trying to cope with Rosie’s manic highs and lows and Rex’s structure and lacking emotions. Will they be able to find a way to make their family work amidst the chaos? I absolutely fell in love with Willow. My heart broke when hers fell apart, I smiled when she smiled and shed a tear when she shed many. She struggles to understand her father, while unconditionally loving her mother. What a beautiful and loving heart. This book had many highs and many lows, just like Rosie, so be prepared to experience a large spectrum of emotions. Be warned that this one is not for the faint of heart.A solid 4 star read by Brianna Wolfson.
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  • Debi Hawkes
    January 1, 1970
    I won an Advance Reader Copy thru Goodreads Giveaway, and am so thankful that I did! I highly recommend this book to others who wish to understand a little about this disease.As a female who has struggled with depression for the past 20+ years, the book resonated with me deeply. To see on the printed page, in the authors own words, exactly how depression feels, was both heartrending and validating. For no logical reason it is impossible at times to even open your eyes, to move your body, to atte I won an Advance Reader Copy thru Goodreads Giveaway, and am so thankful that I did! I highly recommend this book to others who wish to understand a little about this disease.As a female who has struggled with depression for the past 20+ years, the book resonated with me deeply. To see on the printed page, in the authors own words, exactly how depression feels, was both heartrending and validating. For no logical reason it is impossible at times to even open your eyes, to move your body, to attempt to function, to get out of bed.And as a parent, a wife, and employee, you do it. You put on your stageface. You perform. It is exhausting, and only exasperates the problem until you crash. I am grateful for modern medications, and treatment, they help, but it's still there, just more functional without such a steep price. But as the author so beautifully shared, those you love and those who love you, pay such a huge price, and you are helpless to do anything about it.
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  • violet
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a good start for 2018.I loved everything about this book. I loved the author’s writing style, the way she describes situations with feelings that stabs through my heart. I was hooked right from the start and I couldn’t leave my place without finishing this book. I cried, I laughed, I sympathized, I got angry, and I related to this book so, so much.
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  • Alexandria Tyler
    January 1, 1970
    For the first time ever, a book actually made me cry. I didn't think it was possible (maybe it's the genre I have been picking? Or maybe it's just possible that this is a truly beautiful story that will make you sob like a love starved child. This story is heavy, and the author does a brilliant job of painting her "Rosie" world for the reader. The entire time I was reading this book, I was rooting for Rosie, hoping her and Rex would just bend for each other. I also found myself feeling deep pain For the first time ever, a book actually made me cry. I didn't think it was possible (maybe it's the genre I have been picking? Or maybe it's just possible that this is a truly beautiful story that will make you sob like a love starved child. This story is heavy, and the author does a brilliant job of painting her "Rosie" world for the reader. The entire time I was reading this book, I was rooting for Rosie, hoping her and Rex would just bend for each other. I also found myself feeling deep pain for young Willow. I was grieving for her loss in the story, that I had to take a day off from the book. But, Brianna Wolfson is such a talented writer I was right back to read the next day, fully prepared to get into that story with Willow, that Willow's loss felt like my own. I wanted so badly to see Rosie just turn it around because it was so clear her life could have been better it was right there in front of her, but Rosie couldn't see. The quote towards the end "Rosie was wrong" couldn't have been more on point. She was wrong, and it was heartbreaking to read that her depression gripped her so tightly that she couldn't grasp or understand the light at the end of the tunnel. Or maybe she could see it, but the grip of addiction had Rosie in such a choke hold that that"homesick" feeling overrode any emotions or love that she had for even her own husband and children. Those questions really can't be answered, but you will find a small sliver of closure that I was envisioning for Rosie with the ending. The scene is Willow 15 years down the road on a date. Let's just say it was the happy ending I was wishing for Rosie. And a gorgeous start for the individual that was indeed Willow. Daughter of both Rex and Rosie, but still her own unique personality. Let me be perfectly clear, this novel needs to be adapted into a movie, or a Netflix original SOMETHING, it is just that good, with an even better message. Read it, you will not want to put it down.
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  • Krithika
    January 1, 1970
    At once heartfelt and heartbreaking, Rosie Colored Glasses paints every one of its characters with equal and vivid clarity. The book explores a relatively short time frame, but does so from multiple facets and viewpoints to underscore that the world and the people who inhabit it are anything but binary.
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  • Phaedra Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful debut charting the highs and lows of love. Highly recommended
  • Maddie (HedgehogBookReviews)
    January 1, 1970
    You can also find this review on Hedgehog Book Reviews.Wow! I loved this book. I’m so grateful that Harlequin gave me an ARC at BookCon. This is easily my favorite read of the summer, so far. There are a few content warnings I’d like to give, but some of them will spoil the plot. The big one that I’ll mention is that this book talks about addiction in great depth. I’m really looking forward to this review, so please read on!“Even though she was stoned.Even though she promised herself she wouldn’ You can also find this review on Hedgehog Book Reviews.Wow! I loved this book. I’m so grateful that Harlequin gave me an ARC at BookCon. This is easily my favorite read of the summer, so far. There are a few content warnings I’d like to give, but some of them will spoil the plot. The big one that I’ll mention is that this book talks about addiction in great depth. I’m really looking forward to this review, so please read on!“Even though she was stoned.Even though she promised herself she wouldn’t do this.Even though she wished none of this was happening.Rosie drove to Rex’s house to pick up her children.”Willow is just a fifth grader trying to navigate through her marshmallow cereal, a little brother with a lisp, and her parent’s divorce. Besides a few accidents, including one on the playground with her classmates, Willow is doing a pretty great job keeping herself together, especially with the strict rules at her dad’s house. Rosie, her mom, is the more fun parent. Rosie lets Willow and her brother eat ice cream late at night and put on makeup and costumes before watching a movie. Things are going particularly well for Willow, Rosie even visits her at recess, but then something in her mom changes. Willow wants her fun, care-free, loudly loving Rosie back, but she’s afraid that mom is gone forever.This book is told in the different perspectives of Willow’s family members. I was blown away by the narrations from Willow and Rosie because they are so raw. Seriously, I felt like I was looking into their souls. Willow is so full a fear and just wants love. She wants love from everyone, especially her father, Rex, who she does not get any love from. She craves that father-daughter love so badly that it hinders her relationship with Rex. What she doesn’t know is that Rex wants that love too, but shuts himself out. This is a beautiful (that somehow feels like the right word to use here) dilemma that taps into deep concepts of love in family dynamics. I’m taken aback by how much Willow’s need for affection and comfort touched me.I want to go back to the quotation that I inserted above the synopsis of this title. One thing that many addicts use to distinguish themselves from recreational substance users is the fact that they cross boundaries they lay out for themselves. For example, someone may tell themself that they will drink no more than twice a week; and they will stick to that rule. On the other hand, someone who struggles with substance abuse will break rules that they set for themself, as the disease makes it impossible for them to stop. A lot of people don’t understand this aspect of addiction. Although it encourages self-blaming thinking, it is not uncommon for people to think “why can’t addicts just choose to stop taking their drug of choice?” I’m really glad that Rosie Colored Glasses included this passage about Rosie breaking the boundaries she sets for herself and what she will not do while on drugs.In addition to the quotation I inserted into the beginning of this novel, I want to point out one more:“Vicodin welcomed Rosie’s affinity for her high. Vicodin coiled around Rosie and squeezed her so tight she was unable to move. Unable to parent. Unable to do much of anything at all. Except lie there alone and breathe.Until she couldn’t even do that.”I don’t really have much to say about this quotation, because I know what I write will not do it justice. I’d just like my readers to reflect on what this is trying to say about substance abuse and how much drugs can both bring someone up and push them back down.I’m so excited for this book to hit bookstore shelves in February. This was the realest, most raw book I’ve read in 2017, so far. Willow’s crippling desire to be loved is something I’ll never forget. Rosie’s growing dependence on opiates and how it affects everyone in her family will stay with me, as well. I’m ready to name Rosie Colored Glasses to every adult who asks me for book recommendations. Brianna Wolfson did an amazing job with this book. Thank you to Harlequin for kindly giving me a copy of this ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • iamnotabookworm
    January 1, 1970
    The first thing that beckoned me to this book was the title. Who wouldn't be curious with that? What kind of glasses are rosie colored ones? What magic does it possess?This is probably the most heart-wrenching and heartbreaking tale I read for this year. This story would remain with me for long just like Colleen Hoover's It Ends With Us. This story had the same kind of effect. It affected me very deeply and even until now, days after reading it, I can't help but feel sad and sorry for Rosie. Yes The first thing that beckoned me to this book was the title. Who wouldn't be curious with that? What kind of glasses are rosie colored ones? What magic does it possess?This is probably the most heart-wrenching and heartbreaking tale I read for this year. This story would remain with me for long just like Colleen Hoover's It Ends With Us. This story had the same kind of effect. It affected me very deeply and even until now, days after reading it, I can't help but feel sad and sorry for Rosie. Yes, Rosie is a character in this book. She is a mom of two very adorable kids--Willow (what a lovely name!) and Asher. Rosie is a person bursting with life and personality. She is like always high with life. She loves wholly and with all of her. She does everything with great abandon. She goes all out.Life is not all sunshines and roses. Exactly what Rosie's life was. Everything started out great until she can no longer sustain the happiness and the energy that life demands of her. No amount of love that she gives and got back would keep her strong enough. In the end, depression proved to be a very daunting and formidable force that held her. Even her love for her kids was not enough weapon to fight against it. She succumbed and surrendered, leaving her kids heartbroken and lost like a rudderless ship being tossed and thrown by the tempest.This story squeezed my heart out until all that was left is pulp. I felt like I was Willow --lost and clueless. Hoping that the nightmare she was in was just a nightmare. When she wakes up, everything will be sunny and she can play Marshmallow City again. Her mom will shower her with love, hugs and kisses. Everything will be alright because her mom is there. Unfortunately, it was not. The nightmare continues even when Willow is wide awake. And it seemed like the fear and pain is not going to ever go away. What's worst is her dad is not even seeing all the torment she is going through. Her innocence is slowly crumbling and fading. She is unbelievably lost and she needs a hand to hold on to to keep her sane. To keep her anchored but her dad seems to be oblivious to all that. This is a very sad story. This dealt about the battle against depression and its aftermath, whether that person won the battle or not. Especially, if the person affected succumbed to the dark void of depression. Rosie, the main character was a very bubbly person and it was so unbelievable that she did not have enough inside her to cast out depression out of her system. Which just proves that depression is a very serious condition and not a lot of people survived it. Fun-filled and loving Rosie wasn't even spared by it. In a way, she was deep in the grip of depression and her choice of weapon to fight it was addiction. It was a very wrong choice. And the casualty of that choice were Willow and Asher. These two adorable and lively kids grew up with Rosie's abundant and generous love. Her creative spirit nurtured these kids. When Rosie became powerless against her monsters, even her kids' love and presence were not enough to keep her from tumbling down into the rabbit hole of no return.Rex, the other half of Rosie who was not blameless in all of this. I can't blame him for divorcing Rosie. He did try his best to keep his family but he was not totally there for his children. He did not love his children as much as Rosie did. Rosie's love was always bigger and she was closer and more attuned to the needs of their kids, like every mother should be. Rex, in some way was selfish and too inflexible. It took such a tragic event to shake him and be really present for his kids. It was almost too late for him to overcome his fear and embrace the reality that he and Willow were totally different individuals and that it was his duty to reach out and close the gap between them. If there was one character in this story that touched me greatly, it was Willow. A very vulnerable kid yet very lovable and cute. How dare the other kids bully her! She is not weird as some kids in school would like to believe. She is smart and creative just like Rosie and she needs all the hugs, kisses and love she can get, just like every other kid. I just wanted to hug Willow and assure her that everything will be alright. She can depend on me if her father won't be there for her. I wanted to adopt her and Asher so they won't feel lost and abandoned. Arg! Even writing this review felt heavy in the chest. It's as if I am experiencing again the pains of what the characters of this story had to go through. All these emotions are running amok inside me and I had to let them out of my chest. This story calls for packs of marshmallows. I don't care how many, as long as it will be enough to make Willow feel better. Thankfully, Rex came to his senses and vowed to keep his family together. He promised to make his kids feel loved and special just like Rosie did. So, everything ended well. Now, I can stop worrying for Willow because she can still have a love most mad and moonly through his dad. The world does not end with it not being rosie colored anymore and love can come in all other forms. Willow had become a leaky faucet of sadness. She dripped, dripped, dripped with it. It never gushed out in spurts or sprayed anyone around her.- Brianna Wolfson, Rosie Colored Glasses - Thank you again, Netgalley for the copy.
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  • Katrina
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story about a love so quirky, warm and fun it knocks everyone off their feet. Rex can't get enough of the young florist who spiced up the love message accompanying his floral arrangement for his latest, now ex-girlfriend. Intending to confront her, give her a piece of his mind and move on Rex finds Rosie has something he just can't dismiss. He has strong reservations and a sense of dread that this overwhelming attraction simply can't last but Rex is smitten with Rosie. From Rosie's per This is a story about a love so quirky, warm and fun it knocks everyone off their feet. Rex can't get enough of the young florist who spiced up the love message accompanying his floral arrangement for his latest, now ex-girlfriend. Intending to confront her, give her a piece of his mind and move on Rex finds Rosie has something he just can't dismiss. He has strong reservations and a sense of dread that this overwhelming attraction simply can't last but Rex is smitten with Rosie. From Rosie's perspective Rex is the perfect marriage candidate - tall and strong in physique with a quiet sense of purpose and determination in everything he does - but he's also everything Rosie is not. Rosie is a feely-touchy, colourful, loud, unpredictable, fun and totally engaging personality with unruly hair, delicate physique and a quirky bohemian dress sense. Could being married to Rex work? Possibly, but realistically Rosie thinks probably not.That doesn't stop them marrying, having children, and ultimately ruining each other's lives. The slow and steady unraveling of their marriage is one of the most painful and gut wrenching reading experiences I have ever encountered. Their love for each other never wanes but their ability to express and individually thrive within the constraints of marriage does wane. How do you keep a free spirit like Rosie energized? And how do you get Rex to include down time, kissing his children goodnight and having fun with them as essential inclusions on his regimented "To Do Lists" he sees as crucial to a functioning household? And how do you cope with this book when the majority of the narrative is told from the point of view of their eldest child, Willow? A child so much like her mother, Willow has the same untameable hair, the delicate physique, the unique and quirky dress sense, the same love of music and a perennial quest for adventure and fun. She can't get enough of her mother's love and her sense of contentment when Rosie gives all of it to her is so totally encompassing. But when Rosie can't give the fun pizza outings, the giggly screenings of their favourite musicals and movies, the midnight tree climbing expeditions and the escape-from-school surprise seaside visits the pain of Rosie's withdrawn love is overwhelming suffering for Willow. The bed-wetting and day-time wetting, with the pee being soaked up by her socks, is the downside when Rosie's love is not forthcoming. And Willow can't turn to her father to replace this love. He's hurting really badly too and he wants to help her but he's not sure how.The disintegration of their marriage and tragic consequences are heartbreaking but it is ultimately a book of healing where the family - Rex, Willow and her younger brother, Asher - learn to keep Rosie's love inside of them forever. Despite Rex and Rosie's private acknowledgements that their marriage shouldn't have happened, despite the inevitable heartbreak and pain, sometimes a love so passionate, dangerous and wrong is still worth pursuing. I think Rex and Willow would agree "Tis better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all." - Alfred Lord Tennyson. Beautifully written examination of the power of love. I thoroughly recommend together with a good supply of tissues.
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    NB: I received this ARC as a B&N Bookstore employee. What follows is my recommendation that I would share to customers, and is simplified as such. I was pleasantly surprised by Rosie Colored Glasses, though not for the reasons I wished! I expected a fun, light book to read this winter and was instead pulled in to a bittersweet family drama. Willow is an adorable, quirky little kid and I enjoyed the shifting perspectives and movement forward and backward in time to give the reader the whole s NB: I received this ARC as a B&N Bookstore employee. What follows is my recommendation that I would share to customers, and is simplified as such. I was pleasantly surprised by Rosie Colored Glasses, though not for the reasons I wished! I expected a fun, light book to read this winter and was instead pulled in to a bittersweet family drama. Willow is an adorable, quirky little kid and I enjoyed the shifting perspectives and movement forward and backward in time to give the reader the whole story of Willow's upbringing. I wish her voice was more consistent: some passages do not read like a child's but like an omniscient narrator and the language is overly repetitive. It is suggested that Willow is a special needs child and I appreciate that this story was about Willow responding to her parents love and attention, not about her mental health. I wish Rosie, her mother, was explored with more depth. Rosie starts off as a manic pixie dream girl type, but morphs into a more complicated portrayal of a mother with postpartum depression and opioid addiction. It was interesting that the author omits therapy and mental health services entirely from the Rosie's narrative, and Rex similarly does not mention anything specific beyond rehab in passing. While Rex does get to share some of his "side" of the story towards the last quarter of the book, the focus is primarily on Rosie and Willow's mother-daughter bond.This was a fine and nuanced depiction of raising children as a divorced parent, both for mothers struggling with postpartum depression and addiction and for fathers learning how to parent and support their spouses. The story is also a good representation of how adults and children cope with the sudden loss of one parent and the many forms grief can take. My largest grievance is the prose. I'll be curious to see what this author publishes next.Read alike: The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman for readers wanting a present day setting. Good for fans of Jojo Moyes, Sophie Kinsella and Emily Giffin.
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  • Faye
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from the Publisher for my honest review. Wow, where to start. This book touches so many emotions. It is a profound, heartbreaking story; very well written. I picked it up once and had trouble getting into it so put it down, read a couple of others and the second time I picked it up WOW! I could not put it down. It covers so many issues - love, hate, bullying, mental illness, addiction, family issues. Two totally opposite people are attracted, fall in love even though they bo I received this book from the Publisher for my honest review. Wow, where to start. This book touches so many emotions. It is a profound, heartbreaking story; very well written. I picked it up once and had trouble getting into it so put it down, read a couple of others and the second time I picked it up WOW! I could not put it down. It covers so many issues - love, hate, bullying, mental illness, addiction, family issues. Two totally opposite people are attracted, fall in love even though they both know it could not possibly last. The family they produce and all the love and heartbreak in between makes for a tear jerking, heart wrenching story. It breaks your heart but it is so well written, I found it to be a must read book as it really touches your heart and your personal emotions. It is one of the best I have read and will stay with me always. I fell in love with this entire family and you really want everything to be peaches and cream but life just isn't always that way. My heart broke for the author as this story is based on her own mom's battle. As you read you fall in love with Rosie, she is a character, but, you want to shake the hell out of her; I fell in love with Willow, Asher, and Rex; you just can't help it. I have lived some of this stuff personally as I'm sure lots of people have. It gave me some insight so maybe, I'll be a little kinder and understanding of some of the demons others carry around with them. Thank you Brianna Wolfson for writing this book and opening your own heart to others. I am so happy I won this book and was given the opportunity to read and rate it. Truly, it is one of my all time favorite reads.
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  • Chasidy Kaye Jones
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book free in exchange for review. I almost did not finish this book because at first I really could not get into it. But I am really glad I finished it. They end brought tears to my eyes a few times. Rosie is fun, whimsical and can never be still. She has to keep moving. She is flighty and can't commit to anything for long. She meets Rex, who is her opposite in everything. Rex likes books and lists and rules. They say opposites attract and in this case that is true. But Rosie and I received this book free in exchange for review. I almost did not finish this book because at first I really could not get into it. But I am really glad I finished it. They end brought tears to my eyes a few times. Rosie is fun, whimsical and can never be still. She has to keep moving. She is flighty and can't commit to anything for long. She meets Rex, who is her opposite in everything. Rex likes books and lists and rules. They say opposites attract and in this case that is true. But Rosie and Rex both know that because of their differences, their love won't last. They have 2 kids and marry and buy a house in Virginia leaving behind New York City. Thier daughter, Willow, is just like Rosie with a few exceptions. Willow wears the same outfit to school everyday for years. She loves Word Search books. She thinks her dad doesn't love her because he doesn't know how to show it. Rosie has a drug problem but I think the drug use comes from mental illness and trying to medicate herself so she can get her mind quiet. She seems to be manic depressive to me. She loves her kids and shows it excessively one day and locks herself in her room the next day. For Willow, this kind of love is confusing and exhausting but it is all she knows. Hers dad's rules and lists aren't love. She justvwishes her dad could love her like her mom does. would a good night kids hurt ever now and then. I will not spoil the ending but once I got about halfway thru this book, I could not put it down. Maybe the author could go back and rework the beginning a little bit. I am not sure what it needs but it needs something to measure up to the rest of the book.
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  • Gayle Slagle
    January 1, 1970
    Rosie Colored Glasses by Brianna Wolfson addresses the problems of divorce and how it can affect the children involved, but more importantly it addresses the problem of depression and its effects on both the sufferer and those who love them. The book tells two parallel stories; one story revolves around the love story between Rosie Collins and Rex Thorpe, an example of opposites attract. Rosie is a free spirit who looks at the world through rose-colored glasses and is determined to get all that Rosie Colored Glasses by Brianna Wolfson addresses the problems of divorce and how it can affect the children involved, but more importantly it addresses the problem of depression and its effects on both the sufferer and those who love them. The book tells two parallel stories; one story revolves around the love story between Rosie Collins and Rex Thorpe, an example of opposites attract. Rosie is a free spirit who looks at the world through rose-colored glasses and is determined to get all that she can from life. Rex, on the other hand, is a rules follower who keeps a tight rein on himself; however, when he meets Rosie, he is immediately attracted to the light she radiates and the joy she spreads. They marry, have two children, Willow and Asher, and live happily for several years. But things begin to unravel in their marriage and they divorce, sharing custody of Willow and Asher. Part of the story is told from the viewpoint of Willow, who is much like Rosie. It addresses the difficulties that Willow faces going from the free spirited lifestyle of her mother to the regimented, organized lifestyle of her father. The book flashes back to the love affair between Rosie and Rex, from the time they meet until the present. We see Rosie spiral into depression as the book progresses and see into the devastating effects it has on the family. This is a heart-rending book about love, family, illness, and redemption. While the heart can be broken, it can also heal, and Rosie Colored Glasses shows in an intriguing manner this power of love to overcome all obstacles.
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Hello -- Poppy here as I requested to read this book, via Janet as I am more of a fiction reader than she is. I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - Hello -- Poppy here as I requested to read this book, via Janet as I am more of a fiction reader than she is. I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - Rosie Colored Glasses is whim Hello -- Poppy here as I requested to read this book, via Janet as I am more of a fiction reader than she is. I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - Hello -- Poppy here as I requested to read this book, via Janet as I am more of a fiction reader than she is. I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher - Rosie Colored Glasses is whimsical, heartbreaking, uplifting. Eleven-year-old Willow’s marrow burns with the friction of having to navigate between her divorced parents when all she truly wants is to be with her mother Rosie. Rosie makes everything come alive and shine brighter and makes Willow feel special, feel loved…until Rosie’s own demons begin to overtake her. As Willow struggles to make sense of her world of extreme love and extreme loneliness, she learns that sometimes all the love in the world is not enough to save someone, no matter how hard one tries…how the human heart can bend and break, but how it can also heal and grow and be resilient enough to love again.This book may look like a "light read" but it is dark and sad and I cried my eyes out. Seriously. So grey and cold it made me think of the month of November ... worth reading but be prepared!
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  • Ciara Noonan
    January 1, 1970
    This book is incredible. The narration is so wonderful, it reminded me of Matilda a little bit. The characters are all so well crafted it was such a pleasure to read about them and each one's quirks.How cute is Asher? The chapters with him were a joy. With the band-aids? Oh, I full-on sobbed. What a sweetie. However, make no mistake. This book will break you. I ugly cried for the entire last bit of the book. It's a truly heartbreaking tale of addiction and families who live with it. So, so raw. This book is incredible. The narration is so wonderful, it reminded me of Matilda a little bit. The characters are all so well crafted it was such a pleasure to read about them and each one's quirks.How cute is Asher? The chapters with him were a joy. With the band-aids? Oh, I full-on sobbed. What a sweetie. However, make no mistake. This book will break you. I ugly cried for the entire last bit of the book. It's a truly heartbreaking tale of addiction and families who live with it. So, so raw. Rosie, the effervescent, "away with the fairies" type, so full of love and vivid colour falls in love with Rex; a man who is everything she isn't. At first, you think "Rex is a bit of an ass" because, well, he is. Very black and white, very straight, so full of rules and so ridged. But then the story develops and you love him just as much as you love all of the other characters, despite his mistakes and downfalls. Poor Rosie. The chapters of her with her children were so vibrant and real, it was so easy to imagine her bouncing around her kitchen, making her kids pancakes with wild hair and red lips and a flowy dress bopping to Elton John. What goes up must come down, and Rosie came down hard. Such a tragic, beautifully-crafted novel that I couldn't recommend any more.Thanks to NetGalley and Harlequin for providing me with a copy of this wonderfully written book.
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  • Joby Milne
    January 1, 1970
    Rosie Coloured Glasses is a beautifully written novel about extreme love, extreme loneliness and a young girl struggling with her parents’ divorce and her deep attachment to her whimsical mother. Rosie is a wild, energetic, free spirit. Full of love and laughter, she makes everything shine brighter for her children until her demons begin to surface and overtake her.Rex is her ex-husband and the total opposite. "He was both serious and particular about things. About the people he interacted with. Rosie Coloured Glasses is a beautifully written novel about extreme love, extreme loneliness and a young girl struggling with her parents’ divorce and her deep attachment to her whimsical mother. Rosie is a wild, energetic, free spirit. Full of love and laughter, she makes everything shine brighter for her children until her demons begin to surface and overtake her.Rex is her ex-husband and the total opposite. "He was both serious and particular about things. About the people he interacted with. About his vision of being respected and successful. About being a man of authenticity."And then we have Willow, their daughter who absolutely worships her mother and dislikes her father. "Because every time with Mum was like having all the pizza and soda and candy and ice cream in the world and never getting a tummy ache. Days full of fun, noise, chatter, music and games. And each time with Dad was intense and rigid, about standards and expectations. Days full of homework, chores, and manners."I read this story whilst travelling to and from work and had to consciously stop reading it in public because I knew I would become a blubbering mess. It’s joyful, it’s heartbreaking. It’s laugh out loud funny. An emotional rollercoaster that delivers the ultimate lesson in forgiveness.
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