V for Vendetta
"Remember, remember the fifth of November..."A frightening and powerful tale of the loss of freedom and identity in a chillingly believable totalitarian world, V for Vendetta stands as one of the highest achievements of the comics medium and a defining work for creators Alan Moore and David Lloyd.Set in an imagined future England that has given itself over to fascism, this groundbreaking story captures both the suffocating nature of life in an authoritarian police state and the redemptive power of the human spirit which rebels against it. Crafted with sterling clarity and intelligence, V for Vendetta brings an unequaled depth of characterization and verisimilitude to its unflinching account of oppression and resistance.

V for Vendetta Details

TitleV for Vendetta
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 1st, 2005
PublisherVertigo
ISBN1401207928
ISBN-139781401207922
Number of pages296 pages
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Fiction, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Graphic Novels Comics, Comic Book, Classics, Politics, Fantasy

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V for Vendetta Review

  • Alejandro
    December 16, 2007
    Remember, remember the fifth of November... This TPB edition collects the original 10 comic book issues, then divided in the graphic novel in three chapters.Creative Team:Writer: Alan MooreIllustrator: David Lloyd VALIANT VERICITY Remember, remember! The fifth of November, the gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason should ever be forgot! It's one of the first sentences that came to mind when you think about the masterpiece by Alan Moore & David Lloyd. And Remember, remember the fifth of November... This TPB edition collects the original 10 comic book issues, then divided in the graphic novel in three chapters.Creative Team:Writer: Alan MooreIllustrator: David Lloyd VALIANT VERICITY Remember, remember! The fifth of November, the gunpowder treason and plot; I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason should ever be forgot! It's one of the first sentences that came to mind when you think about the masterpiece by Alan Moore & David Lloyd. And certainly something quite easy to remember each year on the mentioned date.However, the most powerful quote that sticks to my mind is... People should not be afraid of their governments. Governments should be afraid of their people. That quote resumes the power of this story.Story of one man.One man who can be everybody. Everybody is special. Everybody. Everybody is a hero, a lover, a fool, a villain, everybody. Everybody has their story to tell… And the story of "V" is one very powerful to tell... Good evening, London. I thought it time we had a little talk. Are you sitting comfortably? Then I'll begin... VIGOROUS VOCALITY This is my favorite graphic novel ever!One of the first impacts when I read reading this graphic novel the first time, it was when I realized that you don't start to read in the beginning of the story.No, the plan of "V" is so carefully crafted that when the government think that he started, he is already finishing it. V? You're almost finished, aren't you? It's very likely that by now, you may have watched the film and it's a very good adaptation. I liked it a lot and it's one of my favorite movies. Are there differences? Oh, yes! But, honestly, as a hardcore Alan Moore's fan, I think that the changes are good thinking that film is a different format than comic book and therefore, some things can be changed and still delivering the same powerful message. There's no flesh or blood within this cloak to kill. There's only an idea. Ideas are bulletproof. However, if you are a truly V for Vendetta's fan, like me, you must read the graphic novel at some point, or you will be missing a lot. VEHEMENT VITALISM Knowledge, like air, is vital to life. Like air, no one should be denied it. It's a wonderful joy to watch how Alan Moore put everywhere the letter "v", in the titles of the chapters just to mention an example.Also, David Lloyd is a very creative partner of Moore, making into art many original concepts like a chapter made entirely in the form a music sheet.Wonderful concepts that you only can get in the format of a graphic novel. VENDETTA VALIDITY If I take off that mask, something will go away forever, be diminished because whoever you are isn’t as big as the idea of you. I am a huge fan of Alan Moore's work and I have the luck to find a lot of his work, not only the quite known examples like Watchmen and this very graphic novel V for Vendetta but also his entire runs of Swamp Thing, Top Ten, Tom Strong, Promethea, Fashion Beast, along with great issues like For the Man who has everything, The Killing Joke, Whatever happened with the Man of Tomorrow, etc......and I loved to read everything and I have to say that my favorite work by Alan Moore is this graphic novel V for Vendetta.I think the strongest issue that convince me to realize that V for Vendetta is my own personal favorite graphic novel but also my own personal favorite work by Alan Moore is because it's that each little detail on the story was so carefully done, so carefully thought, so carefully presented.And that's the beautiful irony of all. Since this is a story about chaos, but it's done with a precision where nothing is left to chance. Everything is where that's supposed to be. No more or less than needed to tell the story.And threrefore, My own personal opinion is that this is his masterpiece in the middle of an universe of masterpieces written by Alan Moore.Not only is a strong political story but also an impressive artwork.Also, the terrorist known as "V" is one of the best characters ever made in literature. What was done to me created me. It's a basic principle of the Universe that every action will create an equal and opposing reaction. That will be all. You may return to your labors. England prevails.
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  • Stephen
    April 23, 2010
    For all of the criticism heaped on movie versions of novels and other literary works (well deserved in many cases), there are times when the filmmakers get it very right (e.g., Lord of the Rings, the Princess Bride, Schindler’s List). The Graphic Novel, in particular, is a format that lends itself well to adaptation and, in the right hands, can often IMPROVE on the source material. Examples of this, IMHO, would include: From Hell, Road to Perdition and Sin City. To that small but distinctive li For all of the criticism heaped on movie versions of novels and other literary works (well deserved in many cases), there are times when the filmmakers get it very right (e.g., Lord of the Rings, the Princess Bride, Schindler’s List). The Graphic Novel, in particular, is a format that lends itself well to adaptation and, in the right hands, can often IMPROVE on the source material. Examples of this, IMHO, would include: From Hell, Road to Perdition and Sin City. To that small but distinctive list I would add V for Vendetta as I thought the film version was superior to the print. That's not to say the graphic novel is not good. Alan Moore deserves a lot of credit for this ground-breaking, original story. Had I not seen the movie prior to reading this, I would likely have been far more impressed with it. However, as it is, I couldn't help feeling that the film did a better job of conveying the “oppressive nature” of the fascist society envisioned in the story. The stellar cast assembled for the movie didn't hurt either. While reading, I often found myself thinking to myself that I preferred the film's vision of the narrative. Without spoilerizing, one example of this is that I thought, in general, the character depictions were vastly enhanced, largely due to the superior casting. I mean seriously, the movie had ....NUFF SAID!!!I also think the movie more clearly defined the central plot, allowing the underlying message of the story to be delivered with more power. As for the climax, the movie's was golden, and I thought the addition of the public’s “participation” was inspired. To be fair, the GN had its share of moments of advantage as well, enough to make reading it worth while even if you have seen the movie. V’s “confrontation” with the “Voice of London” was much more elaborate in the graphic novel, and V’s back story is expanded upon and given more depth. Both of these are interesting and well done. Still, overall I found the movie was superior and I think my rating of the GN suffers a bit, unfair or not, as a result. Thus, a good read and one that I recommend...just make sure to see the movie as well!! 3.5 stars.
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  • Bookdragon Sean
    November 10, 2015
    Prison. What exactly is prison? Is it just the confinement in which we are placed after crime? Or is it something more? Can we become imprisoned without being aware of it? Can we even imprison ourselves? Perhaps even to the state? Alan Moore depicts these questions in this scary graphic novel that is set in some crazy right-winged London that reeks of fascism and corruption. It’s a dark, eerily real place; it is a place that might have actually been in an alternate history. Just like in Watchme Prison. What exactly is prison? Is it just the confinement in which we are placed after crime? Or is it something more? Can we become imprisoned without being aware of it? Can we even imprison ourselves? Perhaps even to the state? Alan Moore depicts these questions in this scary graphic novel that is set in some crazy right-winged London that reeks of fascism and corruption. It’s a dark, eerily real place; it is a place that might have actually been in an alternate history. Just like in Watchmen Moore shows us an alternative past that is stark and weirdly possible. The people struggle under an oppressive regime; they have no voice; they have no liberty or identity: they are in a monumental prison of both body and mind. And, worse yet, because of the mass propaganda campaigns, intimidating armed troop patrols, and lack of freedom in general, the people are not fully aware of their own oppressive plight. They’re ignorant and led along by the voice of power and authority. They have no free will. This is where V. comes in. In the guise of a shadowy villain, the costumed rogue represents pure anarchy. His way of thought, as he himself admits, would lead to nothing but chaos. But, anything is better than fascism, right? Well, you’d think so but V. is far from the morale crusader he identifies himself as. Despite his form of vigilante justice, he is not morally good. What he inflicts on his protégé is nothing but damn nasty; yes, it opened her eyes to the prison of life, but in order for them to be opened he had to inflict great cruelty. Do the ends ever justify the means? Anarchy is the complete lack of authority over the populace, which is what V. is striving for, but he is acting with the power and ruthless of the very thing he is trying to overcome. Indeed, what he exacts is a form of manipulative control, which is the very thing he is trying to destroy through his wave of terrorism. He is certainly a dark and complex character. Perhaps his ethos is even slightly self-defeating and contradictory. I don’t think he’s any better that what he is trying to destroy, but perhaps that’s the idea. Perhaps, Moore is trying to suggest that corruption is the very essence of human nature, and that nobody is beyond it. I think V. is less a man than an ideal. He represents something much bigger than himself, which is signified by his legacy. But, what this thing is destructive and extreme; his idea is not necessarily something beneficial to mankind. I much preferred Watchmen to this; it was less political and focused on human nature rather than the complex nature of politics. I think the right reader could take a lot from this, but for me, I thought it was too bleak. There's little in the way of redemptive themes here. 2.5 stars
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  • J.G. Keely
    May 13, 2007
    I struggled for a long time with the growing notion that conservatives simply aren't funny. At first it seemed a silly idea, since conservatism draws from sources as varied as progressivism: all levels of intelligence and wealth, all kinds of people from all walks of life--yet none of them are funny.Certainly they can tell jokes and be charming, but not satirical, not biting. Subversion doesn't come naturally to them, and it should have been clear why: Conservatism relies on ideals, on grand her I struggled for a long time with the growing notion that conservatives simply aren't funny. At first it seemed a silly idea, since conservatism draws from sources as varied as progressivism: all levels of intelligence and wealth, all kinds of people from all walks of life--yet none of them are funny.Certainly they can tell jokes and be charming, but not satirical, not biting. Subversion doesn't come naturally to them, and it should have been clear why: Conservatism relies on ideals, on grand heroic notions which are to be believed in. Progressives (or Liberals) rely on deconstruction of these notions, which is in itself a subversion.That might not entirely explain the sad discrepancy between Doonesbury and Mallard Fillmore, but it's a start. I feel like this difference in mode is also to blame for some of the more common critiques of Alan Moore's work.He's recently achieved notoriety as a Hollywood Gold Standard--and as the scowling, bearded mascot of rebranding 'Comics' as 'Graphic Novels' (despite the fact that Moore, Gaiman, and I all prefer the original term). As a product of this new visibility, he has been discovered by new readers, some of whom dismiss him as a subversive anarchist.I agree that he is subversive, and that he is interested in exploring violent anarchism in his works, but he has too much subtlety to be saddled with the views of some of his characters. Critics can quickly identify attacks on their ideologies, but seem less skilled at seeing how an apparent 'progressive' like Moore simultaneously attacks his own representation of the agents of change.Rorschach in Watchmen is a parody of the superhero staple of morality by violence (or is it the other way 'round?), a parody the film version completely fails to recognize. Likewise, 'V' is meant to be flawed, fraught and difficult, and Moore invites us to question his philosophies and methods.Moore always gives his characters motives because his characters operate by their psychology: their history, their disposition, their experiences. But in 'V', Moore is giving us a background to establish a motive, which is why we might end up on V's side (beyond the David and Goliath trope).Moore gives us this motive so that he can communicate his ideas clearly. We see that V's actions are accountable personally, which leads us to ask whether they are accountable socially, morally, or ethically. It is, after all, a story concerned with the nature of politics, power, subjugation, and resistance. Like a philosopher hashing out his ideas, Moore explores his theme by setting limits to focus the hypothesis.Whether V can be excused or praised outside his personal motivations is another argument, but the fact that Moore has isolated and located this argument at a point in narrative space shows his thoughtful, deliberate mastery of the form.Like Watchmen, the film version mostly strips out this layer of complexity, and is content (like the majority of action films or violent dystopias) to let this personal struggle be the end of the moral question, thus reducing V to a violent hero (or antihero). This idealized 'personal morality' is common not only in action movies, but in cape comics and conservatism--yet focusing on a wholly personal response precludes observing how politics works, or any grand social scale which is necessarily defined by the impersonal. The personal is simply not important, not viable, and in the end, gets lost in the mix. The billions of personal elements counteract one another into a kind of Brownian Motion, stirring without direction, while the real forces of power move above them and alongside them, shaping the world.Think of all the people acting out their personal moralities, proud as peacocks. You hear people talk about turning off the water when they brush their teeth despite the fact that more than ninety percent of water use is industrial. People buy free-range organic despite the fact that the money still goes to the same five companies (and the term 'organic' is entirely unregulated). People get self-satisfied about their Prius when five shipping tankers produce as many tons of emissions as all the cars in the world.It is not that these personal beliefs cannot change things, in fact they often come to the forefront, but this change is momentary and complex, and hence, no great theory could be made to predict it, so it cannot be harnessed, only taken for granted by the forces of power. The more people act personally, the more they will be taken advantage of, impersonally.It isn't surprising that critiques of Moore tend to focus on these personal, symbolic journeys, but that's simply not how Moore operates. Sympathy for his characters should be mistrusted, just as we must mistrust Milton's Satan; even with all his charm, it is the utmost foolishness not to recognize him for who he is.You don't have to look hard to see these little subversions--these clues that something isn't right--but you do have to look. There is a fast-paced, exciting, complex plot atop it all, and it's easy to get caught up in Alan Moore's stories. Unlike some authors, Moore won't spell it out for you, but calling him an Anarchist is an oversimplification.In interviews, Moore has said that an Anarchist state is one where the powerful rule the weak by fear and force of arms, noting that this describes every government and nation in history, no matter what florid terms are used to make such governance more appealing. Moore may use V to present the ideal of the Anarchist, but we must remember: he doesn't believe in ideals.Which is why Alan Moore is funny. When you are quite sure that he is being serious, you can be certain that he is being funny. After all, the surest sign that we have ceased to think clearly about something is that we can no longer laugh at it. So remember: if you aren't laughing, you aren't thinking; and if you aren't thinking, then you definitely won't understand Moore. My Suggested Readings in Comics
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  • Lyn
    April 6, 2013
    I enjoyed the 2005 film V for Vendetta starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving and so my son bought me the book. The BOOK turned out to be a graphic novel. I asked if this was an illustrated version of the literature and searched to discover that this WAS the book. So the graphic novel sat on my bookcase for months and months while I read other books, more traditionally published. But then I learned that Neil Gaiman had published The Sandman series and I recalled fondly my high school days whe I enjoyed the 2005 film V for Vendetta starring Natalie Portman and Hugo Weaving and so my son bought me the book. The BOOK turned out to be a graphic novel. I asked if this was an illustrated version of the literature and searched to discover that this WAS the book. So the graphic novel sat on my bookcase for months and months while I read other books, more traditionally published. But then I learned that Neil Gaiman had published The Sandman series and I recalled fondly my high school days when I read Marvel and DC comics and I have helped to enliven in my youngest son a fondness for the comics as well and he and I have had fun as he discovered this exciting medium. And then, out of the blue, I found the copy of Alan Moore’s well written and well illustrated story of hope growing like a rose amidst the imagination stifling autocratic theocracy that had become England and I found myself liking it very much. And so, Sam I am, I WILL read graphic novels, in a box, and with a fox, …
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  • Bookwraiths
    November 29, 2012
    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.When I picked up this graphic novel (after years of telling myself I’d get to it one of these days), I really wanted to love it. Watchmen by Moore is one of my all-time, favorite graphic novels, so I always envisioned V for Vendetta being another masterpiece of comic writing along those same lines: not only entertaining but enlightening as well. Unfortunately, I was immensely disappointed by this graphic novel.Now, to be fair, I hate overtly political literary Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths.When I picked up this graphic novel (after years of telling myself I’d get to it one of these days), I really wanted to love it. Watchmen by Moore is one of my all-time, favorite graphic novels, so I always envisioned V for Vendetta being another masterpiece of comic writing along those same lines: not only entertaining but enlightening as well. Unfortunately, I was immensely disappointed by this graphic novel.Now, to be fair, I hate overtly political literary works. If a writer wishes to explore political themes in the framework of an interesting and compelling story then I am fine with that, but I personally do not enjoy stories that are only about politics. And for those of you who have read V for Vendetta, you already know that this graphic novel is 100% a work of political theology. It preaches. It prods. It shouts at you to pay attention. But no matter V’s incessant soliloquies, it utterly falls flat.Probably the majority of the blame for V for Vendetta’s failure goes to the fact that in order to have a story you must first have a character, and V is not a character but a political ideology given human form in his iconic black suit and white mask. He is an idol to anarchy, wrapped in pop culture coolness to make anarchism an attractive viewpoint. And to make this political theology even more appealing, Moore squares him off with the most repulsive opponent he could concoct: an ethnocentric, homophobic, pedophilia, racist, anti-science fascism that drapes itself with religious justification for its inhumane actions.No matter his opponent, however, V quickly proves himself to be insane. (Whether his insanity is mild or extensive is up for debate, I suppose, but there is little doubt that he is not going to pass a psychological evaluation without getting several diagnoses.) He kills when he needs to. He blows up things when he deems it appropriate. He tortures – both physically and emotionally – his foes and friends alike when he believes it serves some greater good. And he shows no regret for any innocents who might be harmed in the aftermath. Revolutionary behavior, I hear some of you saying. Perhaps. Yet,V never seems to have any rhyme or reason to his madness. At least not one that he sticks with. There is no desire to fix the problems of the world, but rather an all-encompassing desire to unleash chaos so that it may spread in a wild conflagration until anarchy is obtained and, somehow, remolds society into a chaotic utopia. Sure, apparently innocent people will get harmed , but, ultimately, all the world’s problems are these people’s fault anyway, so why shouldn’t they suffer for their poor choices.To describe the story as convoluted is to be gracious to its famous writer, because this tale is filled with ambiguity to the point a reader has no idea if V is a “good” guy, a “bad” guy, or just some mentally deranged person running around killing people and blowing things up for fun. He will aid a person one page only to set them up for horrible things to happen to them the next. He will give a grand soliloquy on the need to “Vomit up the values that [have] victimized me” one moment, then turn around and exhibit his new, enlightened values by torturing his “supposed” friend to induce a level of insanity comparable to his own. Honestly, V’s display of anarchist morality becomes a tiresome exercise in futility.The sad truth about this graphic novel is that V for Vendetta is a work of political proselytism. A piece of demagoguery whose message takes precedent over the actually story being told. V more an avatar for anarchy than a real revolutionary attempting to better the lives of his fellow men and women. This graphic novel is not inspirational. It doesn’t expand your mind by forcing you to analyze your current political leaning. Rather, it is just another piece of political ideology, where the writer frames the narrative in his terms so that only his viewpoint is attractive, and as such, it is better left undisturbed by those seeking a true story.
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  • Bryce Wilson
    July 9, 2008
    If Watchmen is Alan Moore's Sergeant Pepper, and From Hell his Abbey Road (And in the end the love you take is equal to the number of prostitutes you disembowl) then V For Vendetta is his Rubber Soul. Like Rubber Soul it tends to get overlooked and undervalued because it's "merely" a perfect pop record rather then a artform redefining masterpiece. V is simply put a potent piece of Pop Art. The story is bracing, the art beautiful, the way it plays with iconography of humanities past sins is simpl If Watchmen is Alan Moore's Sergeant Pepper, and From Hell his Abbey Road (And in the end the love you take is equal to the number of prostitutes you disembowl) then V For Vendetta is his Rubber Soul. Like Rubber Soul it tends to get overlooked and undervalued because it's "merely" a perfect pop record rather then a artform redefining masterpiece. V is simply put a potent piece of Pop Art. The story is bracing, the art beautiful, the way it plays with iconography of humanities past sins is simply genius. It's politics are more earnest then they are sensible. I find Anarchy to be a very coddled philosophy. It's the same reason I snicker whenever I see someone wearing an Emma Goldman or Ayn Rand T shirt. Not because I have any great love for government, but because I side with The Joker in my firm belief that so called "civilized" people will eat eachother alive when given the slightest reason or provocation. Hell most of them do it anyway.Anyway rant ended, great book, Alan Moore Prevails.
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  • Algernon
    March 15, 2014
    Behind this mask there is more than just flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea ... And ideas are bulletproof. Comic books are for geeky kids who dream of men in tights saving the world and women in skimpy outfits who swoon into their brawny arms, right? Who takes comic book seriously? Alan Moore is not the only name to be put forward in answer to this question, but he is for me the best example of the power behind the medium. I rate 'V for Vendetta' on the same level as '1984' or 'Animal Fa Behind this mask there is more than just flesh. Beneath this mask there is an idea ... And ideas are bulletproof. Comic books are for geeky kids who dream of men in tights saving the world and women in skimpy outfits who swoon into their brawny arms, right? Who takes comic book seriously? Alan Moore is not the only name to be put forward in answer to this question, but he is for me the best example of the power behind the medium. I rate 'V for Vendetta' on the same level as '1984' or 'Animal Farm' or 'Fahrenheit 451' : one of the literary manifestos that have come to define our modern society (as Voltaire and Montesquieu defined the French Revolution), an allegedly dystopian future that is painfully already become the present we are living in. Honestly, the actual presentation of the book was uneven, alternating between brilliant script passages and stark, powerful poster-art graphics down to muddled secondary characters and slow paced detours from the main story. But, like it says in my opening quote, the idea behind V is stronger than the execution (Alan Moore was still experimenting with the medium and developing his skills in this early piece). The proof of the enduring quality of the tale is not necessarily in the success of the movie version (which I liked even better than the comic), but in the recent proliferation of masked 'Guy Fawkes' anarchists who are starting to challenge their governments in their abuse of authority, and who believe in the freedom of information and the freedom of expression, with Wikileaks, Anonymous, assorted whistleblowers and antiglobalization protesters hopefully only the tip of the iceberg: People should not be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their own people.  And in another place: “Authority allows two roles: the torturer and the tortured. Twists people into joyless mannequins that fear and hate, while culture plunges into the abyss.” The society presented in the novel is an exaggeration of trends towards fascism and mass surveillance that Moore noticed already in the early 1980's, while the nuclear conflict that caused the collapse of democracy in his story has been avoided so far, terrorism being the rallying point of fearmongering. The artist uses his anarchist premise in a didactic role ( with V as the teacher and Evey as a stand-in for the reader) , as a challenge to take a hard look at our own lives and do something about changing the world: Artists use lies to tell the truth. Yes, I created a lie. But because you believed it, you found something true about yourself The artist is 'V', who makes a spectacular entrance as the flamboyant masked justiciary in a cape who saves a damsell in distress (Evey) from the clutches of secret police thugs. His introduction is a riot of wordplay and innuendo, and of course I've bookmarked it for savouring it at my leisure: Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is a vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition! The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose, so let me simply add that it's my very good honor to meet you and you may call me "V".” Pretty soon Evey learns her saviour is no knight in shiny armour like Superman or Captain America, but a dangerous anarchists who is bent on bringing down the government in a blaze of fire. I will leave the actual details of the plan and of the execution out of my review out of consideration of readers unfamiliar with the comic, only mentioning that Alan Moore did a sterling job subverting the myth of the superhero, pointing out the risks of taking the law into your own hands and the fact that destruction is necessary but not enough for creating a better world. I'm the king of the 20th century. I'm the boogeyman, the villain, the black sheep of the family. The identity of the man behind the mask remains a mystery to me, as it should, because 'who' he is is less important than 'why' he is. Sometimes I found his teaching methods too brutal and hard to swallow, but at the end of the journey in his company I knew him in his secret heart and I bleed for him and for my own inadequacy:“But what I hope most of all is that you understand what I mean when I tell you that even though I do not know you, and even though I may never meet you, laugh with you, cry with you, or kiss you, I love you. With all my heart, I love you.” The comic spends a lot a panels on fleshing out the oppressors, the politicos supported by police, army, secret surveillance, propaganda, religion, scientists involved in concentration camp research on immigrants and indesirables. They are called in the book The Eyes, The Voice, The Fingers, The Head etc. This is the part I sometimes found confusing and less well executed, with the exception of an elderly crime investigator who still reads books and thinks outside the box. “Since mankind's dawn, a handful of oppressors have accepted the responsibility over our lives that we should have accepted for ourselves. By doing so, they took our power. By doing nothing, we gave it away. We've seen where their way leads, through camps and wars, towards the slaughterhouse.” Since I named the comic a literary manifesto, I will close my review with the rest of the slogans that jumped out of the panels to write themselves on my conscience. I hope they will remain there to burn brightly as I continue my literary pursuits in other directions. My mother said I broke her heart ... but it was my integrity that was important. Is that so selfish? It sells for so little, but it's all we have left in this place. It is the very last inch of us ... but within that inch we are free. --- While a truncheon may be used in lieu of conversation, words will always retain their power. --- Knowledge, like air, is vital to life. Like air, no one should be denied it.
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  • Foad
    August 16, 2014
    "فکر کردی میتونی منو بکشی؟ زیر این شنل گوشت و پوستی وجود نداره تا با گلوله از بین بره؛ زیر این شنل فقط یه آرمانه و آرمان ها ضد گلوله ن."یکی دیگه از کمیک های معروف و خیلی خوب "آلن مور" نویسنده ی افسانه ای کمیک.داستان این کمیک در انگلستانی مشابه آنچه جورج اورول در 1984 توصیف میکنه اتفاق میفته و به شرح مبارزات یه هرج و مرج طلب با نام مستعار "وی" میپردازه.مقایسه با فیلمکمیک خیلی از فیلم بهتره. شیوه ی روایت آلن مور، شیوه ی کنار هم گذاشتن تصاویر و ترکیب دیالوگ ها با صحنه ها، خیلی هنرمندانه است. اوج ای "فکر کردی میتونی منو بکشی؟ زیر این شنل گوشت و پوستی وجود نداره تا با گلوله از بین بره؛ زیر این شنل فقط یه آرمانه و آرمان ها ضد گلوله ن."یکی دیگه از کمیک های معروف و خیلی خوب "آلن مور" نویسنده ی افسانه ای کمیک.داستان این کمیک در انگلستانی مشابه آنچه جورج اورول در 1984 توصیف میکنه اتفاق میفته و به شرح مبارزات یه هرج و مرج طلب با نام مستعار "وی" میپردازه.مقایسه با فیلمکمیک خیلی از فیلم بهتره. شیوه ی روایت آلن مور، شیوه ی کنار هم گذاشتن تصاویر و ترکیب دیالوگ ها با صحنه ها، خیلی هنرمندانه است. اوج این شیوه ی روایت رو توی کمیک دیگه از همین نویسنده، "نگهبانان" میتونید ببینید.علاوه بر شیوه ی روایت، پایان کمیک به کلی با پایان فیلم متفاوته. پایان بندی فیلم شدیداً هالیوودی و کلیشه ایه و اصولاً فایده ی "ایوی" (دختری که پیش "وی" زندگی میکنه) چیزی جز فایده ی عنصر زن در فیلم های قهرمانی هالیوودی نیست: نقش معشوقه یا موجودی ضعیف تر که با تکیه کردن به قهرمان، قهرمان رو قوی جلوه میده.ولی در کمیک نقش ایوی به کلی متفاوته و بودنش توی کمیک، هدف داره.ویشخصیت "وی" که قهرمان داستانه، زیادی قدرتمند و باهوشه. بدون هیچ مشکلی هر کس رو که میخواد میکشه، هر ساختمانی رو که میخواد منفجر میکنه و به ابررایانه ی دولت نفوذ میکنه و پلیس ها مدام دور خودشون میگردن، بدون این که بفهمن چه اتفاقی افتاده. این که هیچ چالشی سر راهش نیست، از جذابیت داستان کم میکنه.ثانیاً "وی" زیادی شعار میده که باعث میشه تک جمله های نابی که بعضی وقت ها میگه، بین انبوه سخنرانی هاش به چشم نیان و هدر برن.جدای از این ها، شخصیت شوخ طبع، قدرتمند و حکیم "وی" خوب و به یاد موندنی بود و "هیو ویوینگ" خیلی خوب نقشش رو توی فیلم در آورده بود (هر چند فقط صداش شنیده میشد.)
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  • Laura
    April 29, 2008
    Eh.Okay. There's political writing, and then there's political comics (Watchmen, also by Moore). Pure political writing, essays or editorials or what have you, doesn't have to leave everyone satisfied. It can leave some angry or displeased or challenged, so long as it makes its point.POLITICAL COMICS HAVE TO BE DIFFERENT.A political comic must not only make a clear political point, but it must ALSO be interesting in a way that is peculiar to comics: it must have a gratifying narrative, it must b Eh.Okay. There's political writing, and then there's political comics (Watchmen, also by Moore). Pure political writing, essays or editorials or what have you, doesn't have to leave everyone satisfied. It can leave some angry or displeased or challenged, so long as it makes its point.POLITICAL COMICS HAVE TO BE DIFFERENT.A political comic must not only make a clear political point, but it must ALSO be interesting in a way that is peculiar to comics: it must have a gratifying narrative, it must be artistically sound, and it must have the same kind of emotional influence that a regular old novel or movie would have, because comics are, primarily, STORIES.V for Vendetta is a glut of political writing stuffed into an attractive skin of art and garnished over with the platitudiest delivery I have ever had the misfortune to be exposed to outside a 50s superhero comic. My god. It's got the same blind and senseless energy of delivery that any Superman-hurling-a-car comic would have. This stems, I think, primarily from the fact that it's an anarchist comic, and making anarchism into a coherent and attractive viewpoint is nearly impossible, given that anarchism is probably the illest-conceived of any extant ideology.However, because it's ANARCHISM, because the writing is coherent and cleverer than most graphic novels', because it's all draped over with mystery, because it's a well-designed book, tone and layout-wise, and because the art is fantastic, the essential failure of the book-- the fact that it lacks anything behind its shell of hyperenergetic blathering-- gets a pass.Seriously. The book tries so hard to be political and symbolic it crushes itself. Premise-wise, the story doesn't make a lot of sense-- we hear that England was living in a government vacuum for several years, and that London was straight-across flooded, and that every other landmass on the planet has been nuked, AND that a nuclear winter has occurred, but for some reason they're still living in a fully-mechanized modern consumer society. All right. Sure. Also, it appears that the only remaining political ideologies in the universe are Fascism and Socialism/Communism, with Anarchism resting on its own crazy-ass axis out who the hell knows where. All right, again. Beginning to sound more and more like Revolutionary Spain/every third world country ever. Sure. Got that. 'First and freest Republic in the world loses all sense of its political heritage and persecutes the hell out of its inhabitants' is the ONLY trend in British apocalyptic fiction, but this is the worst I've ever seen it done.I don't know. What is Moore posing here as the only options for political ideology? He paints a world in which one can ONLY be EITHER a ethnocentric homophobic racist fascist or an 'anarchist'. All right. What does he mean by this? Returning to a state of nature? Gradual and spontaneous shift to democracy? End of the modern mechanized world? Spontaneous national adoption of a sort of leaderless socialist state? Hmm. Moore handles his material childishly. For me, the political-apocalypse stories that WORK show the protagonists yearning after a state of leave-me-alone-let's-all-be-friends sort of political neutralism-- a state of 'let's have universal human rights and that's all please' joy. A utopia of 'being a normal person'. Children of Men is like this. Even Watchmen is less heavy on the socialism and focuses more on the 'let's stop being persecutors and start being nice to everyone else again' mentality. Readers can therefore identify with the protagonists-- they aren't radicals. They're just normal people trying to be normal again. But in V for Vendetta, the only way peace can be achieved is if every individual person is a politically-radical crowd member willing to use mob violence.Not inspirational.I don't care what you think about the degree to which individuals must be political to preserve their rights. This book makes no coherent political point and the messages it DOES articulate are comprised solely of platitudes. It fails to rpesent any realistic view of any political spectrum whatsoever. Instead of focusing on human rights/the dignity of man/the right to be free, it sours the whole batch by presenting some shallowly-conceived idea of anarchism as the solution to all modern political crises. The fact is that this book reads like a poorly-contrived piece of anti-Thatcher propaganda. Which is essentially what it is.EDIT: I've read some other reviews of this book on goodreads and I've decided I have to make one point.You CANNOT like this book becuase 'V is an amazing character.' V IS ALMOST NOT A CHARACTER. Moore specifically has him talk about how who he is is not important. V is a big bundle of soggy political ideology stuffed up into a man-suit with a funny mask on the front. The whole backstory bit exists to give the situation-- the SITUATION, not the character-- plausibility. The fact that the backstory even exists sours Moore's ideological point, which is unfortunate, since the point was shallow enough to begin with. V is suppsoed to be an 'everyman', and is supposed to represent the potential in all of us to make a difference. But how did he get like this? First of all, he's insane, mildly or seriously, but slightly insane at some level, at any rate. Secondly, he's got SUPER POWERS of combat/the mind that he was given in a crazy SCIENCE-FICTION HORMONE EXPERIMENT. All right. So the potential to make a difference is there in all of us, but we need a hero to tell us this is so, and that hero himself needs to be a super-human person in some way before he can take up the job? I don't think so.There's some extreme cognitive dissonance in this story. Moore can't decide whether to espouse the power of the people as a body or the power of the individual-- an individual who, in some ways, is nearly as charismatic as a 20th-century dictator, yet who is, in other ways, utterly flat and irrelevant.V is not a character. V is an idea, and a cloudy one at that.
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  • Anna
    October 29, 2014
    remember remember the 5th of novemberΒαθιά πολιτικό, συνδυάζει το μέλλον με το παρελθόν σε μια υπόθεση που θα μπορούσε να διαδραματίζεται στο παρόν, το παρελθόν ή το μέλλον. Εκπληκτική σύλληψη και υλοποίηση της ιδέας, κάνονας απόλυτα σαφή τα μηνύματα που θέλει να δώσει. Εξαιρετικό και το σκίτσο. Εξαιρετική και η ταινία (πόσους υπέροχους ρόλους έχει παίξει ο Hugo Weaving - Matrix, Lord of the Rings, V for Vendetta...)
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  • Sam Quixote
    March 16, 2014
    V for Vendetta is one of those books that has the reputation for being one of the greatest comics ever written and frequently appears on “graphic novels everyone must read” lists. It’s a celebrated classic by the most acclaimed comics writer of all time, Alan Moore, and is one of the few books many non-comics readers have read. But why is this so feted? V for Vendetta is a badly written, even more poorly conceived pamphlet espousing anarchism as the ideal political system featuring non-character V for Vendetta is one of those books that has the reputation for being one of the greatest comics ever written and frequently appears on “graphic novels everyone must read” lists. It’s a celebrated classic by the most acclaimed comics writer of all time, Alan Moore, and is one of the few books many non-comics readers have read. But why is this so feted? V for Vendetta is a badly written, even more poorly conceived pamphlet espousing anarchism as the ideal political system featuring non-characters in a moronic dystopian future world with a storyline of the most convoluted revenge. The setup: when nuclear war breaks out, the environment goes to hell, flooding and black skies etc., and Britain suffers so badly that democratic government falls to pieces. Fascism rises and the country becomes a military dictatorship, banning things like art, music, and public freedom just because, and everyone is ok with this. Even when concentration camps (called here “resettlement camps”) start popping up and people get shuttled there to die and be experimented upon. One of these poor souls experimented upon survives and takes the roman numeral on his door as his name – V. This man quietly builds up a hideout of contraband and weaponry as he prepares to tear down the government and begin a revolution.Ok, the nuclear war thing was a product of its time. V for Vendetta was written in the 80s when the Cold War was going on and everyone thought the nukes would start flying at any moment. But the extreme left wing reaction of Moore’s to Thatcher’s Conservative government is also outdated, comparing her policies to one step away from things Hitler would enact (and how dreary is it when western politicians get compared to Hitler?). So the setup right away dates this book and makes its proclamations of future dystopianism seem utterly ridiculous and hysterical - which they are. But the rise of fascism in Britain is completely unbelievable. People in Britain will protest at the drop of a hat - a cutting of benefits in certain public sector jobs, an unfair tax, and so on. That NOBODY would protest or stand up against the dismissal of democracy, the rise of fascism, concentration camps, strict curfews, the loss of basic freedoms, and insane amounts of prejudice and random violence from the people supposedly in charge? It’s the fantasy of a lunatic. Or an extreme left winger like Moore. Or both. But it serves it’s intended purpose which is Moore’s idiotic belief that anarchism is the answer. Look, fascism clearly doesn’t work, but giving up on democracy because of Thatcher? Madness. 30 years later and we’re still standing - dare I say, even better off with her time in government? My point is that anarchism is definitely not the right political system, but to Moore it is the perfect form of everything. Under anarchism, people are free to be themselves, live in peace, enjoy things they like, etc. - oh if only we had a political system in place for such things to exist. Oh that’s right we do: democracy. But democracy has to fail because Moore believes anarchism is the answer and so paints democracy as bad and anarchism as good. Nearly all of the characters in this book are ciphers. V isn’t a character because he doesn’t have characteristics - he’s just Moore’s mouthpiece for his political rantings (when he’s not quoting literature or rock lyrics). And interestingly given Moore’s recent views on superhero characters being juvenile and examples of stunted emotional growth, V, arguably Moore’s most famous creation, is a superhero himself. He’s a character who’s basically invincible until he’s meant to die in the script, and can dispatch enemies and execute his plans perfectly as if there were no obstacles in his way (and is there anything less interesting than a hero who gets his way every time? Where’s the conflict?). Evie isn’t much of a character either. She’s a helpless dull girl who gets caught up in V’s campaign against the government, “learns” that anarchism is the greatest thing ever (after being tortured by V), and then parrots said nonsense back to the people at the end. The detective character, Finch, is equally boring. He meanders about uselessly following V’s footsteps, always too late to stop him, until the end when he’s supposed to be a competent detective. Oh yeah and through Finch we discover that apparently if you take psychotropic drugs in abandoned places where bad things happened, you literally time-travel and the past comes to life around you!The Leader is also an awfully constructed “character”. You might remember John Hurt’s performance in the V for Vendetta movie as a brittle old ranting tosspot but the Leader of the book is a very quiet and unremarkable man who sits in front of screens murmuring to his underlings. Guess what Moore’s revelation about him is? If only the Leader had known love in his life, he wouldn’t have become a dictator!!! Moore’s writing is generally quite tedious but his work in V is the most turgid his prose has ever been. The pages are simply glutted with captions and long-winded speeches, slowing down what little action there is to a snail’s pace, and removing any kind of reader-interpretation from Moore’s overly stated scenes. And the problem with having characters you don’t care about means you don’t care about anything that happens to them in the story. Certain scenes are meant to be emotional and powerful like when Evie stands naked in the rain, “free”, after enduring V’s tortures. Except I read that scene and felt nothing. It was two non-characters making empty gestures. The story is repetitive: V kills someone who was at Larkhill Resettlement Camp, goes and tells Evie about the wonders of anarchism, Finch shows up and uselessly tries to figure out who killed the person, the Leader looks at a screen and stares at a screen. Repeat this a dozen times and you’ve got the book. There’s an interminably unfunny scene where V “talks” to Lady Justice, the statue, taking on both personas as he argues for why he’s fighting against fascism. And here’s the thing: is anyone reading this book going to actually favour fascism? I don’t, you probably don’t - I don’t imagine anyone reading this does! So what a daring position to take: a stand against a failed political concept that everyone is already against! Hearing an argument - made numerous times - against fascism is like listening to a child who’s just discovered Hitler and the Nazis and is telling everyone what a bad thing they were. DUH, we already know, stupid! It’s like saying “killing people is wrong” - agreed, and? Because this is the viewpoint of V for Vendetta, criticising the book gives the impression that you’re for oppressive/far right government, which I doubt anyone reading this is (I know I’m making a lot of assumptions but I’m sure most people aren’t this stupid - quite the opposite belief that Moore adopts in this book). I’m not a fascist, I’m not pro-fascism, I’m not against people liking all kinds of culture or being who they are - I just don’t like this crappy comic. It’s like this book comes prepackaged with an automatic response mechanism: dislike this and you’re immediately a bad person. The book is written from a childish viewpoint - assuming that people would be docile against such oppressive movements and it wouldn’t occur to anyone to rebel in any way even when family members and friends are literally being beaten in the streets, taken to death camps, and experimented on. Give the people some credit! If that kind of blatant villainy started happening, they wouldn’t need a Velvet Underground quoting superhero like V to tell them to rebel, they’d already be doing it! And really, nobody thought to check the underground to see if that’s where V was hiding? Hmm, we’re expecting an attack on the seat of government, Parliament. Well, we’ve checked everywhere except the underground - but he probably won’t be coming from there. I mean, there are rails leading directly to Parliament which he could use to equip a train with explosives on and send it straight to Parliament but he probably won’t do that so we won’t check! You see what I mean? It’s like a halfwit wrote this drek! The bad plotting, non-characterisation, terrible writing, and obnoxiously moronic political posturing is like listening to a teenager wittering on ceaselessly about something that could only make sense to someone who shared his worldview, not to anyone with a considered opinion who thought for themselves. Which makes me wonder about the overwhelmingly high ratings this book gets - is it purely because Moore anticipated the “surveillance state” where CCTV cameras are everywhere, that this is rated so highly? I’ll give him that, but to ignore everything else about this book and call it a classic is ridiculous. I applaud the sentiment of personal freedom, celebrating culture and embracing other cultures, and accountable government by the people and for the people, but I detest the way Moore’s gone about it in this near-unreadable book.
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  • Celeste
    November 5, 2016
    “Remember, remember the fifth of November; the gunpowder treason and plot. I can think of no reason why the Gunpowder Treason should ever be forgot.”V for Vendetta is one of my favorite movies of all time. For that reason, I never read the graphic novel that inspired the movie, for fear that it would fall short. Until today, that is. And I needn’t have worried; Alan Moore’s original story was just as powerful as the movie. I wasn’t disappointed at all, and this is now my favorite graphic novel.I “Remember, remember the fifth of November; the gunpowder treason and plot. I can think of no reason why the Gunpowder Treason should ever be forgot.”V for Vendetta is one of my favorite movies of all time. For that reason, I never read the graphic novel that inspired the movie, for fear that it would fall short. Until today, that is. And I needn’t have worried; Alan Moore’s original story was just as powerful as the movie. I wasn’t disappointed at all, and this is now my favorite graphic novel.I think of V for Vendetta as an alternate 1984, one where Winston and Julia fought back against Big Brother and won. It’s such a powerful story that I can’t really think of how to properly describe it. Bigots and fear mongers will always twist tragedies to their own ends, and will always seek to eradicate anyone who looks different or acts different or thinks different than they do, and will do their best to cow the remainder of the population into submission. In both V for Vendetta and 1984, those bigots and fear mongers succeeded. But V for Vendetta gives us something that 1984 does not; it gives us hope. Because ideas are bulletproof, and the Thought Police and Norsefire can only reach so far. They can beat us down and even kill us, but there is an inch of us they cannot touch without our consent. Even in death, that inch, our integrity, is ours and ours alone. They cannot take it, as they cannot take hope.There was one thing that was added to the movie that I missed in the book: V’s Alliteration Speech. Here it is below:"Voilà! In view, a humble vaudevillian veteran, cast vicariously as both victim and villain by the vicissitudes of Fate. This visage, no mere veneer of vanity, is it vestige of the vox populi, now vacant, vanished, as the once vital voice of the verisimilitude now venerates what they once vilified. However, this valorous visitation of a bygone vexation stands vivified, and has vowed to vanquish these venal and virulent vermin vanguarding vice and vouchsafing the violently vicious and voracious violation of volition. The only verdict is vengeance; a vendetta held as a votive, not in vain, for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous. Verily, this vichyssoise of verbiage veers most verbose vis-à-vis an introduction, and so it is my very good honor to meet you and you may call me V." Such a superbly satisfying soliloquy, sí?One thing I liked better about the graphic novel was the growth of Evey. Natalie Portman did a wonderful job in the movie, but I felt like the Evey present in the final scenes of the graphic novel was stronger, harder, more fully developed.Do I recommend the graphic novel? Wholeheartedly. Is it better than the movie? No. But they’re both wonderful and inspiring and worth consuming. Please, consume them both.
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  • Sidharth Vardhan
    August 4, 2016
    “I didn't put you in a prison, Evey. I just showed you the bars.”I watched the movie first, I loved it - I knew I would love the novel too and yet it amazed me. It answers Orwell's 1984 question; the way Lion King's Hakuna-matata answered Hamlet's 'To be or not to be'. Alan Moore assures us worst of governments can be broken by a single man believing in a single idea. The prose is simply beautiful - I felt like hugging every word uttered in it, specially in Valerie's letter:"“But what I hope mos “I didn't put you in a prison, Evey. I just showed you the bars.”I watched the movie first, I loved it - I knew I would love the novel too and yet it amazed me. It answers Orwell's 1984 question; the way Lion King's Hakuna-matata answered Hamlet's 'To be or not to be'. Alan Moore assures us worst of governments can be broken by a single man believing in a single idea. The prose is simply beautiful - I felt like hugging every word uttered in it, specially in Valerie's letter:"“But what I hope most of all is that you understand what I mean when I tell you that even though I do not know you, and even though I may never meet you, laugh with you, cry with you, or kiss you. I love you. With all my heart, I love you.” I'm going to quote it a lot for rest of my life.Pacifism gets the hardest hit; the fact that V is seen as a terrorist goes on to show that. V creates an anarchy like situation and dies. Moore won't tell you what kind of government is better but simply that one must not give in to a order full of injustice; and that such order should definitely be broken. It shall result in Anarchy but that is not necessarily a problem. Anarchy always result in new order; to be retained if good and to be destroyed again if found unjust.And, of course hats off to David Lloyd for illustrations.
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  • El Marcapaginas
    August 4, 2014
    Cómic visionario que está lleno de buenos valores a pesar de la crueldad y violencia que encontramos en sus páginas. Un obra de culto imprescindible para los amantes del arte secuencial.
  • Mia (Parentheses Enthusiast)
    April 28, 2016
    This was totally a five-star book. The artistic style and design, the incorporation of different viewpoints, the writing of internal dialogue- they were wonderful. The fantastic fusion of art and prose is obviously indicative of how well Moore and Lloyd worked together, and rarely do we come across a figure like V who remains just as indecipherable in the end as he was in the beginning, constantly providing the reader with food for thought. The Shadow Gallery was a brilliant creation as well, up This was totally a five-star book. The artistic style and design, the incorporation of different viewpoints, the writing of internal dialogue- they were wonderful. The fantastic fusion of art and prose is obviously indicative of how well Moore and Lloyd worked together, and rarely do we come across a figure like V who remains just as indecipherable in the end as he was in the beginning, constantly providing the reader with food for thought. The Shadow Gallery was a brilliant creation as well, up to par with Sherlock's study and Dumbledore's chambers.Actually, it's more of a four-star book. It wasn't earth-shattering or life-changing, but the craftsmanship is here all the same. I have to give it credit for seamlessly combining elements that at first seem disparate: nuclear war, Guy Fawkes, concentration camps, fascism, vigilantism. There are touches here that are delightfully literary, like Valerie's beautiful letter or V's noirish cabaret song (complete with sheet music, which was a lot of fun for me to play on my keyboard), which effortlessly bring the lofty concepts back down to the reader's level, making it more than just a manifesto.Now that I think of it, it's a three-star book. For all its theatricality and flare, for all its uniqueness and clever tactics, one can't escape the feeling that V for Vendetta still treads on familiar ground in terms of predictable relationships between characters, and between characters and the government. The way Moore peers deeper into a fascist regime to examine the human cogs and their motivations is fascinating, yes, but the whole message gets lost a bit somewhere between V's incessant diatribes and the bizarrely tangential and wildly confusing interludes in the middle.I guess it's a two-star book. After all, the story is greatly lacking in coherence, jumping from viewpoint to viewpoint with abandon and throwing together all manner of ridiculous and unnecessary subplots. It's hard to relate to any of the characters, as they consistently make absurd decisions and act erratically. Not to mention that I still didn't know 90% of the characters' names because of how much they blended together, and some of the dialect writing, Scottish specifically, was beyond impossible to read. Also, in the end, the theme is flimsy, leaving many intricacies unanswered.You know what? This is a one-star book. The two main characters are cardboard cutouts, and the whole thing is completely impenetrable in terms of the denseness and contradiction of the political ideology therein. With a plot that goes from intriguing to confusing to off-the-rails, culminating in a climax that comes simultaneously too early and far too late, any charm that the artwork and innovation conjures up is decimated by sloppy pacing that manages to both rush and lag. Beyond that, V's monologues and modes of speech became grating, and Evey's transformation, like so much else, wasn't believable....do you see my problem here?
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  • Kim
    August 20, 2012
    Ugh.So I read this book because people seem to think it is this great political tome and V is this great revolutionary character. I couldn't disagree more:1. This graphic novel is deeply sexist. The main female character is weak, spineless and insipid, drawn in this awful vaguely tarty style, and used as less an actual character, and more as a plot point. V saves her from being raped and murdered - and I could get into a diatribe here about how much I dislike sexual violence being used for enter Ugh.So I read this book because people seem to think it is this great political tome and V is this great revolutionary character. I couldn't disagree more:1. This graphic novel is deeply sexist. The main female character is weak, spineless and insipid, drawn in this awful vaguely tarty style, and used as less an actual character, and more as a plot point. V saves her from being raped and murdered - and I could get into a diatribe here about how much I dislike sexual violence being used for entertainment, but I'll save it for a later point - only to be tortured into seeing things his way and working with him, which brings me to...2. V is for Vendetta people, not anarchist revolution. The character is driven by rage and a desire for personal revenge, not a free society. Also, the political rantings are vague, shallow, boring, and, um, sort of senseless ranting. Also, getting back to the sexism, the character breaks up with justice because SHE is a WHORE, he seriously says this, and decides to get it on with anarchy. First of all, revolution without justice, hello different totalitarian state. Second, fuck you Alan Moore, really, we're sexualizing the rev now? Never forget ladies, who you fuck is more important than who you are or what you think. 3. Poorly drawn. A lot of the art was hard to follow, which sort of defeats the purpose of the pictures telling a story in a graphic novel.4. Rape is not entertainment. It's not funny, it's not sexy. There are other ways to establish bad characters and fucked up social structures. 5. Mostly though, I stopped reading it because I got bored. I didn't find any of the characters to be that interesting or well developed and I wasn't terribly interested in the storyline, so I quit.
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  • JA
    December 29, 2016
    Loved the movie so much, but not so much love for the book. Some parts of the movie didn't stay true to the book which, I think, made the movie way better. The book was a bit too sexist at times. I understand, though, that this was written in the 70s/80s so I let it slide. But I am still glad I have, finally, finally read this since this is one of my most anticipated reads this year. My 100th book :)
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  • Sud666
    February 19, 2017
    V for Vendetta is superb. For people wanting to read this book, that's really all you have to take away from my review. Written in a period of liberal angst (over Thatcher's Election as PM) wherein he forecasts a dystopian view of England's future. There has been a nuclear war (not very specific as to the who/why) but England has been spared. The government is Fascist and uses Orwellian terminology for it's different departments-the Head, the Fingers, the Eye, etc. In this world we are introduce V for Vendetta is superb. For people wanting to read this book, that's really all you have to take away from my review. Written in a period of liberal angst (over Thatcher's Election as PM) wherein he forecasts a dystopian view of England's future. There has been a nuclear war (not very specific as to the who/why) but England has been spared. The government is Fascist and uses Orwellian terminology for it's different departments-the Head, the Fingers, the Eye, etc. In this world we are introduced to V.The story is about V and his attempt to bring down the government. V channels his inner Guy Fawkes (aka Guido Fawkes-a Catholic Englishman who attempted to kill King James I by blowing up Westminster Palace. Um he didn't. He was found guarding the Gunpowder, arrested and managed to fall off the scaffolding, before being hanged, and promptly broke his neck.) by blowing up Parliament.He is joined inn this by Evey Hammond. Evey was nearly raped and killed by a group of Fingermen, when she is rescued by V. Her metamorphosis from meek to her "reincarnated" mindset near the end of the story is quite remarkable. As far as V- he is something more than human. I shall not spoil the rest of the story or the plot for you-especially if you are unfamiliar with what happens.The plot of the angst driven anti-hero fighting a fascist government is really not that original, but what sets this book apart is Alan Moore's prose. It is quite simply beautiful. It flows smoothly and compels the reader to pay attention to each and every word-a rarity in comic writing. This is Moore at his finest (though Watchmen and Swamp Thing are also of similar quality) using Shakespeare and other famous authors to give V's speech a measure of class and culture that serves up memorable lines. This is a story that can be read merely for the writing itself.The art is quite decent especially considering the time. The art complements the dark story line. The colors are muted and only a few colors are used. The entire feel is a mix of dreary, depressing and yet sinister all at the same time. Quite in keeping with the nature of the government in the tale.If you are looking for a great story, phenomenal prose that will stay with you after finishing the book and most of all- the salient points it makes about people and their particular relationship with their government, self-development and concepts of what is freedom make this a deep book. Unlike most comics, this not only entertains-but it gives food for thought. It paints a stark warning of the price people will pay for "security". This is not a fun tale, though there is a great deal going on and is meant to be more of an engine to drive the thoughts of readers. There is a lot of subtle things such as V- is it V for Vendetta? Each chapter of this tale has a word that starts with "V" as its title. There is something to be said also for "Evey" (V?) and her eventual transformation.A superbly written tale. That's the best summation for this magnum opus from the mind of Alan Moore. Even people who have no use for comics, should read this one. The prose alone makes it worth it. Highly recommend to anyone for with a love for the written word. Do yourself a favor and do not let the movie be the reason you know this tale- read the original, far deeper, far darker version.
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  • Eh?Eh!
    October 18, 2010
    Rbrs #7/8 (alternate to the usual)My grasp of anything political is weaker than a limp handshake, so I don't fully understand the message or meaning since this is clearly a fist in the sky against something. I mean, the obvious is there, freedom and individuality and art in all its forms and diversity and privacy and life! vs. a police state. Anarchy is presented as a solution to an extreme political situation; I'd thought anarchy meant no government and chaos, but is described here as being "vo Rbrs #7/8 (alternate to the usual)My grasp of anything political is weaker than a limp handshake, so I don't fully understand the message or meaning since this is clearly a fist in the sky against something. I mean, the obvious is there, freedom and individuality and art in all its forms and diversity and privacy and life! vs. a police state. Anarchy is presented as a solution to an extreme political situation; I'd thought anarchy meant no government and chaos, but is described here as being "voluntary order" (195). Is that right? Well, that's better than chaos but would that really work? That assumes something about the anarchists, a passion w/educated self-restraint that I don't think would happen, since there are always those who try to advance self at the cost of others (see, the ending w/Helen Heyer) and differing opinions on any gray-ish area (see capital punishment, abortion, taxes, etc) (gray in the sense that opposing arguments are made). Anarchy is also explained as being a 2-part idea, first destruction to clear the current order and then creation to replace it, hopefully with something better (222), and I guess repeat until it works. Doesn't that sound like the Operative from Serenity? The fascist Central Planets used anarchy as a tool to control their population. Huh.I think Evey represents the confused citizen and then the creation side of anarchy, wanting to just act and demanding to assist the anarchist (43) but then is shocked at the tactics. Her transformation into creator is...interesting. Okay, this is a weak line of thinking but I was noticing that the differnt parts of the facist state are labeled as body parts, the Eye for cameras, the Nose for investigation, the Mouth for propaganda, the Finger for enforcement, and was there an Ear for listening? Then when V gave Evey the complete tour of the Shadow Gallery, he compared it to the brain. Evey's trials caused harm to her body by starvation, fear, a shaved head, and torture, along with the TP story all leading to a mental fortification, integrity in the face of death of the body. Is that what's required for true understanding and readiness and meaningful action, to make the body's needs less than that of the mind? It's true, the body distracts with its hunger, thirst, cravings, and just overall bulkiness. We spend much of our time working for money to keep the body satisfied, and leisure is spent resting the mind from its efforts in taking care of the body. Is it the only way to make progress politically, to set aside comforts and pleasures in favor of a mental reward in the form of accomplishment? "Ideas are bulletproof" (236). This doesn't seem right, either, because the purpose is to defend things that please both mind and body, I think. Knowledge, romance ("Always, always romance" (218)), music. Maybe the destruction side pits the mind against the body, but then the creation side brings the two together?The character of V is a mystery, always masked to the end because "whoever you are isn't as big as the idea of you" (250). I...don't like that. This makes heroism seem out of reach for a regular person. Anyway, V is supposedly male, a subject of hormone research that killed everyone else. All the V's in this book, the chapter names, the Roman numeral V, Victoria station. I was wondering...was he Valerie Page? There were panels where V seemed to be mourning her (85, 104). One of the other male patients was described as losing his generative organs and developing additional body parts. Maybe V's treatment resulted in a gender flop? There were pages torn from Delia's diary....This was slow going for me, since it seemed hard to absorb the words in illustrated panel format. I had too much time to tab pages.Page 116 - TEH CHILDREN
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  • Aubrey
    August 7, 2010
    I don't read comic books of this type all that often. It's true that in my youth I devoured shelf after shelf of the Asian equivalents, but I can tell you that the two are as different as night and day. I came to this graphic novel with its movie, the fellow Alan Moore work Watchmen, and a whole host of literature under my belt, and that's the context that I'll review it in.The movie cut whole swathes of the story out, and plumped up what was left with a good old fashioned mix of action sequence I don't read comic books of this type all that often. It's true that in my youth I devoured shelf after shelf of the Asian equivalents, but I can tell you that the two are as different as night and day. I came to this graphic novel with its movie, the fellow Alan Moore work Watchmen, and a whole host of literature under my belt, and that's the context that I'll review it in.The movie cut whole swathes of the story out, and plumped up what was left with a good old fashioned mix of action sequences, a budding romance, and dramatic flourishes in general. I'm not surprised at that, the comic did have some really grotesque story-lines that would have never made it to the big screen. The movie even improved upon the characters in my mind, the ones besides V and Evey at any rate. In the comic, these two were the only ones who really shone, both in characterization and the fact that they contrasted heavily with the sea of white men making up the rest of the cast. The movie retained the single racial aspect, in accordance to the one party, one race policy sweeping the setting, but they sprinkled personality quirks wherever possible. Made it easier to differentiate the characters, as well as the sideline plots they were involved in. Or it might have been that that the skin colors just started blending together, and that I'm better at telling characters apart when I don't have to pick them out of a visual crowd. Hard to say.What the movie didn't do, though, is give both V and Evey their full due, but especially Evey. Both paper and film retained the (view spoiler)[pseudo capture (hide spoiler)], one that is to this day one of the most powerful scenes I have seen in any medium, and is one of the main reasons why V for Vendetta is close to my heart. But after that, only the comic delves deep into what V is, and continues to develop Evey beyond the shivering girl child found at the beginning. Only in the comic does she take charge of her life, and live beyond the shadow of V. And as the only female character to get more than a slew of short pages in the main plot, that counts for a lot. This comic is no Watchmen. It cannot begin to compare in terms of creativity, characterization, social contextualization, and insight into the human condition. But it is a good start, and has its own unique flavor to it that cannot be found in its more lauded kin. And, of course, who doesn't love menacing rhymes with centuries of historical context, all of which go into the creation of one of the most complex and charismatic figures in the history of graphic novels? I sure do. Remember, remember the 5th of November. The gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason should ever be forgot.
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  • Kirstine
    May 9, 2012
    I've loved the movie version of this ever since I first saw it, and it always made me sad how Alan Moore apparently didn't approve of it. I see now why he might have been disappointed, but I was not (this is perhaps helped by the fact that I didn't write the comic). I still love the movie, but there is no doubt the graphic novel is somewhat superior. It just... It's a work of utter brilliance. And intelligence and insight into humanity. Sure some of the 'predictions' haven't come true or were fl I've loved the movie version of this ever since I first saw it, and it always made me sad how Alan Moore apparently didn't approve of it. I see now why he might have been disappointed, but I was not (this is perhaps helped by the fact that I didn't write the comic). I still love the movie, but there is no doubt the graphic novel is somewhat superior. It just... It's a work of utter brilliance. And intelligence and insight into humanity. Sure some of the 'predictions' haven't come true or were flawed back when it was written, but the heart of it, the core of it, is so strikingly true and profound. It will change your life. V is one of my all-time favourite characters. A man, nay, an ideal, someone who believes in all the things I hold most dear; freedom, justice, love. And when they became corrupted: anarchy. Sweet, reckless anarchy. V is someone who is willing to fight for these things, completely unapologetically (and I mean that, he is NOT sorry for killing a few people who are in his way), and it's interesting!The art is beautiful as well, a bit raw and edgy, and wonderfully detailed. And the story itself is, of course, fantastic. Sometimes the words struck me the hardest, sometimes the art, sometimes both combined. In any case, there are parts of this that will knock you sideways and have you fumbling a bit in the dark, as your ideas and beliefs crumble around you - or perhaps you'll recognize the liberation you've once felt yourself. The sudden knowledge that all you must do is stand up and say no; you're free. Do as I did, and borrow it from your local library or a friend or buy it (as I will later), but get your hands on it. NOW. I absolutely recommend this to everyone.
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  • Paul
    October 19, 2008
    I reread this in one sitting one cold, Saturday in February. It's still remarkable and more than a bit terrifying in our age of Trumplandia.
  • Riku Sayuj
    January 23, 2012
    Watching the movie first was a big mistake - but maybe the movie had a finer dramatic tension to it, being less inclined to be so philosophical and cryptic?
  • Josu
    July 9, 2014
    Me da mucha pena darle un cuatro sobre cinco, porque realmente la historia de V y cómo se desarrolla es de cinco estrellas. Sin embargo, tengo que juzgar a la novela gráfica como a un todo, y por tanto, creo que algunas tramas secundarias no acompañan a la principal. La mayoría de los personajes que se nos presentan en segundo plano sirven como exploración de algunos de los temas a tratar, como la búsqueda del sentido de la vida o la venganza, pero no consiguen terminar de encajar con la trama d Me da mucha pena darle un cuatro sobre cinco, porque realmente la historia de V y cómo se desarrolla es de cinco estrellas. Sin embargo, tengo que juzgar a la novela gráfica como a un todo, y por tanto, creo que algunas tramas secundarias no acompañan a la principal. La mayoría de los personajes que se nos presentan en segundo plano sirven como exploración de algunos de los temas a tratar, como la búsqueda del sentido de la vida o la venganza, pero no consiguen terminar de encajar con la trama de V y su meta. Creo que, por tanto, V de Vendetta es una lectura espectacular que te hace pensar y que además, está perfectamente ambientada y narrada. La construcción de la trama principal, como comento, es magistral y el tratamiento de los personajes de V y Evey son de los mejores tratamientos que he tenido el placer de leer en mucho tiempo. Además, tiene un ritmo endiablado que consigue llevarte a historias del pasado y del presente con una facilidad asombrosa, conectando ambas para formar un marco de la historia aún mayor. Pero el fallo es ese, el añadir tramas que realmente sirven para crear algo más grande, pero que queda en un proyecto ambicioso. Y ME DA PENA, VALE. Pero es lo que hay. Sin duda, voy a repetir autores. El dibujo me ha gustado y el hecho de que tuviese cambios radicales de colores para ambientar diferentes escenas o ambientes, así como que en general se usasen colores poco saturados me ha parecido interesante. En cuanto a la historia en sí, creo que es increíblemente buena, consiguiendo gustarme más que el dibujo. Sin duda, una lectura imprescindible.
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  • Jesse A
    September 21, 2016
    Another A.M. I didn't enjoy. Listen I understand his contributions to the medium but all in all I don't enjoy most of his work. The 2 exceptions were, obviously, Watchmen and From Hell. Watchmen is justifiably called one of the greatest GNs of all time. From Hell was more impressive than entertaining. That's all. I just don't love A.M.
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  • LectoraEstherica
    March 1, 2017
    "La felicidad es una cárcel""Tienes miedo porque la libertad es terrorífica""Las ideas son a prueba de balas"
  • Evgeny
    April 30, 2014
    The plot of the graphic novel is well-known, so I do not think I will go into many details. Basically after a nuclear war Britain survived, but now has a pseudo-fascist government - with concentration camps and such. There were a series of experiments on human prisoners in one of the camps with one prisoner surviving and acquiring super-human abilities (as well as some touch of madness). The guy escaped and is now planning his revenge on the people who were in charge in the camp as well as the w The plot of the graphic novel is well-known, so I do not think I will go into many details. Basically after a nuclear war Britain survived, but now has a pseudo-fascist government - with concentration camps and such. There were a series of experiments on human prisoners in one of the camps with one prisoner surviving and acquiring super-human abilities (as well as some touch of madness). The guy escaped and is now planning his revenge on the people who were in charge in the camp as well as the whole government system which made it possible for such camps to exist.I am about to say something which might get me banned from all social websites with book discussions. Here it goes: the movie was better. The novel feels like anarchist propaganda with some pictures and disjoint plot-lines thrown in. The movie had a good plot with side plots going nowhere removed and the main characters being more interesting (Evey in the novel feels like an empty shell, no so in the movie).I already mentioned some parts of the plot being nothing but filler. Let me not get started on anarchy itself: there was never a single point in history where anarchy was beneficial to humankind. In fact, from the humanity experience it was not much better that fascism for which is was a proposed cure in the novel. The latter does not even make a good case for anarchy.There were several really outstanding moments which saved this comic from receiving otherwise well-justified 2 star rating; I count 3 of them out of the top of my head. I was warned by my friends about this novel (hi, Wendell!); I deserved to be bored while reading it for not listening to them. This review is a copy/paste of my BookLikes one: http://gene.booklikes.com/post/893284...
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  • Sonia M
    January 23, 2017
    Fascism has taken over England after a war destroyed everything, the dictator believes himself a savior, a man strong enough to set order. To unite all people under one roof (“England prevails”) he’s after anyone who doesn’t fit the norms. But is fascism really just an idea? Not a single mention about the economical conditions that create fascism. Alan Moore painted a dystopia similar to Hitler’s regime but Hitler was not just a crazy guy – that’s the easiest explanation of his behavior. He serv Fascism has taken over England after a war destroyed everything, the dictator believes himself a savior, a man strong enough to set order. To unite all people under one roof (“England prevails”) he’s after anyone who doesn’t fit the norms. But is fascism really just an idea? Not a single mention about the economical conditions that create fascism. Alan Moore painted a dystopia similar to Hitler’s regime but Hitler was not just a crazy guy – that’s the easiest explanation of his behavior. He served capitalism. How many companies increased profits using the captives of labour camps! Class struggle is also absent from V’s speech about people managing their own lives. He’s absolutely right when he says it is fear of responsibility making people give control up to leaders. But what exactly does managing our own lives mean? A revolution is sure to fail unless people have a vision of the the new order, not just a general, undefined idea of freedom. It’s my only objection about the comic. Apart from that, it’s a great piece of art. Anarchists are both creators and destroyers, chaos as a hopeful, necessary stage towards the goal, Evey’s training to lose fear (disturbing but true to reality), a superhero who is not an individual but an idea, all these elements create a powerful story. Deep, original and inspiring.
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  • Azumi
    May 14, 2016
    Terminado. Solo me queda levantarme quitarme el sombrero y aplaudir.Una obra maestra, genial.